How Thick Do You Coat Your Cakes With Icing Before Applying

Decorating By bennett5 Updated 16 Jun 2010 , 1:56pm by LindaF144a

bennett5 Posted 15 Jun 2010 , 11:53pm
post #1 of 13

How thick do you coat your cakes with icing before applying Fondant?

12 replies
catlharper Posted 16 Jun 2010 , 12:06am
post #2 of 13

I do a very thin coating which I made as smooth as possible. Especially in the summer time, too thick of a coating can melt and slide and take your fondant with it. So I keep it very light and as smooth as possible. Cat

indydebi Posted 16 Jun 2010 , 12:47am
post #3 of 13

thin.

carmijok Posted 16 Jun 2010 , 1:05am
post #4 of 13

Ok, so I had the same question a few days ago and I got all kinds of people telling me that they do it thick. I mentioned too that I had seen a Ron Ben Isreal cake on Martha Stewart and when she cut into it the buttercream under the fondant had to have been at least a half inch thick. I was asking because I'm planning on covering a cake for the first time in a couple of weeks because I want the smooth white finish of fondant but not everyone likes fondant and I want people to be able to peel it off. Virtually everyone that answered my question said they make their buttercream thick before topping with fondant. And of course very cold. So...which is it? Or do I have to find out by trial and hopefully not error? icon_eek.gif

tracey1970 Posted 16 Jun 2010 , 1:22am
post #5 of 13

I do just a bit more than a crumb coat, but less than a full BC layer than I would do if there were no fondant. I did a full layer of BC under fondant once, and it was way squishy! When I smoothed the fondant, the BC came out the bottom!

artscallion Posted 16 Jun 2010 , 1:36am
post #6 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by carmijok

Ok, so I had the same question a few days ago and I got all kinds of people telling me that they do it thick. I mentioned too that I had seen a Ron Ben Isreal cake on Martha Stewart and when she cut into it the buttercream under the fondant had to have been at least a half inch thick. I was asking because I'm planning on covering a cake for the first time in a couple of weeks because I want the smooth white finish of fondant but not everyone likes fondant and I want people to be able to peel it off. Virtually everyone that answered my question said they make their buttercream thick before topping with fondant. And of course very cold. So...which is it? Or do I have to find out by trial and hopefully not error? icon_eek.gif




I think you get different answers to this (and many other) question(s) because it's not just a matter of thick or thin BC. Each of us does things differently. This one uses a different BC recipe than that one who uses thinner fondant than the other one who chills the cake for an hour after applying fondant to set it, etc, etc, etc. Each of these many, many, many variables contributes to the final result.

I think this is one of the best and worst things about forums like this. The good thing is you hear all kinds of opinions...and the bad thing is...you hear all kinds of opinions.


BTW...I use a full coat of BC under fondant and have never had a squish, a droop or a sag.

bennett5 Posted 16 Jun 2010 , 7:55am
post #7 of 13

thank you so much ladies !!!

leily Posted 16 Jun 2010 , 12:52pm
post #8 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by carmijok

Ok, so I had the same question a few days ago and I got all kinds of people telling me that they do it thick. I mentioned too that I had seen a Ron Ben Isreal cake on Martha Stewart and when she cut into it the buttercream under the fondant had to have been at least a half inch thick. I was asking because I'm planning on covering a cake for the first time in a couple of weeks because I want the smooth white finish of fondant but not everyone likes fondant and I want people to be able to peel it off. Virtually everyone that answered my question said they make their buttercream thick before topping with fondant. And of course very cold. So...which is it? Or do I have to find out by trial and hopefully not error? icon_eek.gif




The reason you see different answers is because something different works for everyone. I get better results with a thick layer (or the same amount as if it wasn't fondant covered) than I do with a thin layer or crumb coat. Plus my customers want the buttercream. You need to find what works for you.

crazyladybaker Posted 16 Jun 2010 , 1:08pm
post #9 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by tracey1970

I do just a bit more than a crumb coat, but less than a full BC layer than I would do if there were no fondant. I did a full layer of BC under fondant once, and it was way squishy! When I smoothed the fondant, the BC came out the bottom!




This has happened to me as well. icon_cry.gif

KHalstead Posted 16 Jun 2010 , 1:19pm
post #10 of 13

I do a full layer of bc under my fondant, I ice it just like I would if it was going to be an all buttercream cake (only I don't obsess about crumbs as much), I haven't had any issues with squishiness, but I use Satin Ice fondant and it firms up nicely after having been on the cake a bit so maybe that helps avoid the squishies?

kimbordeaux Posted 16 Jun 2010 , 1:21pm
post #11 of 13

I buttercream coat according to cake. Most of my cakes are scuplted, 3D cakes. If I want fondant to just lay were I place it I use a thin coat. If I want to squish fondant around after laying it on cake I use a thick coat. You know say I need some definition on cake, muscles, bumpy, wavy or dents... I use thick buttercream to get this soft effect with fondant. You'll learn what is best for you eventually.

carmijok Posted 16 Jun 2010 , 1:35pm
post #12 of 13

Thanks for helping. I know there's no one perfect answer. I'm just glad to hear the reinforcements for a full coat of BC under fondant. I don't think it will squish as long as my BC is cold enough. Good thing this particular cake is for a friend's party that I'm going to and I'm not getting paid for it! I can learn on this cake. icon_lol.gif

LindaF144a Posted 16 Jun 2010 , 1:56pm
post #13 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by carmijok

Thanks for helping. I know there's no one perfect answer. I'm just glad to hear the reinforcements for a full coat of BC under fondant. I don't think it will squish as long as my BC is cold enough. Good thing this particular cake is for a friend's party that I'm going to and I'm not getting paid for it! I can learn on this cake. icon_lol.gif




Could it be that it depends on what kind of buttercream you are using? I read that a lot of cake decorators such as Ron Ben Israel use IMBC and that IMBC is very stable because you candy the sugar before you put it into the egg whites. I use SMBC and to me it is not stable enough to put fondant over unless it was chilled and then you get the issue of moisture. At least this is my experience making SMBC. I am still trying to get the hang of that frosting. It is so popular and I read about a lot of cake decorators who use SMBC under fondant too. I believe I must be doing something wrong because I do not get a "strong" buttercream out of SMBC. I'm going to keep trying til I get it right.

And then there is the crusting buttercream. I have no idea how that acts under fondant. So I can't take a guess as to whether it is "strong" enough for fondant.

artscallion - I agree with your comment. You are so right.

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