wrong cake flavor

Business By aandsmommy Updated 19 Jun 2010 , 4:55am by JanelleH

mayo2222 Posted 14 Jun 2010 , 6:35pm
post #31 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by aandsmommy

i guess I am a little confused...isn't a white cake essentially the same as yellow, but with no yolks?




You are correct

I believe box mixes also add in some yellow coloring to help get the golden yellow coloring.

Edit Posted 14 Jun 2010 , 6:47pm
post #32 of 72

I use the White on White buttermilk cake as my white cake. It only has egg whites in it, but has increased amount of butter, which makes it look yellowish, not white. I guess, I could have gotten that complaint as well.
Don't let her bully you.

LisaMarie86 Posted 14 Jun 2010 , 6:48pm
post #33 of 72

I wonder how she is going to respond. Seems like she is trying to pull ove over though. My white cake looks yellow too because I put pudding mix it in. Its delicious but it is a yellowish color. Crazy.

KHalstead Posted 14 Jun 2010 , 7:02pm
post #34 of 72

I think she'll probably be happy, since it seems her main GOAL is to get SOMETHING for NOTHING!!

rosiecast Posted 14 Jun 2010 , 8:00pm
post #35 of 72

I know it's been asked before, BUT why is she asking for a groom's cake?
OP do you know? lol It makes no sense.

aandsmommy Posted 14 Jun 2010 , 8:07pm
post #36 of 72

lol...no idea on why she wants a grooms cake....too funny.

Mindy1975 Posted 14 Jun 2010 , 11:27pm
post #37 of 72

she probably wants a "groom's cake" at her leisure of course, so she can turn around and use it for her new hubby's birthday down the road! lol

-K8memphis Posted 15 Jun 2010 , 1:44am
post #38 of 72

I try & encourage fellow cakers to hang onto as much of their hard earned money as possible when it comes to complaints. But dang a white cake that's yellow is hard to beat around the bush about. And it's a matter of degree too but I mean I use full butter smbc so I tell my brides that the icing is off white a pale pale yellow. Some are ok with it due to the taste factor some say uh ugh all pure white. So that color thing is way important.

I like your idea of offering up the 24 cuppies. Good call.

elvisb Posted 15 Jun 2010 , 2:00am
post #39 of 72

I think if the contract says "white almond" I can see why she expected to see a white cake since white is part of the wording. If it said "sour cream almond" then color wouldn't make a differnecen because the contract didn't specify a color. I don't know that she deserves to have anything back just because the color wasn't what she expected, but at least she's not demanding the whole price of the cake or something. If she were my customer, I would go ahead with the cupcakes to smooth things over. You never know when something simple like that might go a long way for PR and help your business later on. And a dozen or two cupcakes won't cost you a lot.

costumeczar Posted 15 Jun 2010 , 10:48am
post #40 of 72

I think it depends on what the contrat says. If it says "white" cake then she has an argument, f it says "almond" not so much. If you made a note that she wantd it to be white in color, then it should have been white in colr.

I have three different almond cake recipes that I use, and none of them are perfectly white, but they also are all different, and some brides request one over the other. If I'd had a specific request and made the wrong cake, that would have been my mistake, and I'd give money back. Personally, I don't understand why giving someone cupcakes would be okay. I hate cupcakes and if my baker who'd screwed up my order said "well, I'm giving you these cupcakes and that's your refund" I'd be slightly pissed off, and would tell everyone about it. What did the specific contract say? Has that been said yet?

-K8memphis Posted 15 Jun 2010 , 1:28pm
post #41 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by aandsmommy

OK, so made a lovely cake this past weekend and bride had requested almond cake with chocolate mousse and fresh raspberries. Cake was beautiful, but I guess I made a mistake because she wanted white cake with almond flavoring, but I made a scratch sour cream almond which was pale yellow. She called to say that she was thrilled with the cake, but was unhappy with that part. I asked what she wanted and she said some money off or a groom's cake icon_eek.gif
Thoughts on the 1-2 dozen cupcakes and how to word a response.
Thanks!
Anita




I don't know our op says she made the mistake.
Was it a misunderstanding or a mistake.

Because the point is that yellow cake is a different flavor. I mean it's not the subtle color difference between two chocolate cakes or a darker strawberry. Yellow cake is a different flavor and it's not traditional--it's not the norm it's not the expected flavor unless yellow cake is specifically ordered.

I mean besides the yolks there's the butter and vanilla too to taint the whiteness. I mean white cake is not pale yellow. but white cake can be slmond flavored and still be very white.

I can see her being concerned about the difference. White is a big deal at a wedding. Yellow cake is a different flavor. And if she noticed that much...that is a glaring difference.

Whether it's a full out mistake--is it reasonable to expect that almond cake be white for a wedding cake? If I ordered almond cake I'd expect it to be white for a wedding myself. Almond extact is clear, and sour cream is white.

And I mean you mighta wanted to ask her when she wanted the cupcakes.

costumeczar Posted 15 Jun 2010 , 1:48pm
post #42 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by RoccosMom

Because the point is that yellow cake is a different flavor. I mean it's not the subtle color difference between two chocolate cakes or a darker strawberry. Yellow cake is a different flavor and it's not traditional--it's not the norm it's not the expected flavor unless yellow cake is specifically ordered.

Whether it's a full out mistake--is it reasonable to expect that almond cake be white for a wedding cake? If I ordered almond cake I'd expect it to be white for a wedding myself. Almond extact is clear, and sour cream is white.
.




I make an almond cake that has almonds in it, and it's not white-colored, but it's not based on a yellow cake recipe either... It sounds like this was a misunderstanding, but if the bride wanted a white-colored cake then a cake that wasn't white-colored isn't what she ordered, regardless of if it tasted like almonds or not. I'd still base whatever desicion the OP made on what it said on the contract. If it specifically mentioned a white cake, then it's reasonable to assume that the bride thought the cake would be colored white. If it just says almond, then that can't be assumed.

aandsmommy Posted 15 Jun 2010 , 1:48pm
post #43 of 72

well...still waiting on her reply. she said she was thrilled with it but just wanted to bring it to my attention because she was surprised. I never use shortening, so I never could have made a brilliant white cake. She did know this, but I also should have clarified further. I told her the cupcakes can be whenever she wanted...so its not like here have some cupcakes even though you have no use for them.

costumeczar Posted 15 Jun 2010 , 1:52pm
post #44 of 72

Just to clarify, was this a wedding cake, or was it a shower cake? I still don't get why she's asking for money off the groom's cake, or was it just that she's asking for a refund in general?

SweetResults Posted 15 Jun 2010 , 1:54pm
post #45 of 72

Do you mean to say that this bride in her WHITE dress with her WHITE flowers and her WHITE shoes with her WHITE pearl handled cake knife cut into a cake that was not perfectly WHITE???

*gasp* icon_surprised.gif
The inside of her cake did not fit with the color scheme of the wedding - who cares if the FLAVOR was actually correct. People cannot SEE the FLAVOR! It must have CLASHED with the place setting that it was served on - the wedding was completely RUINED!!! I can't believe you wont' refund every penny PLUS write apology notes to every person who attended so they know that it was not the bride's fault that the cake was not white as snow like a wedding cake "should" be.

SHOCKING! Simply SHOCKING!!! icon_eek.gif

icon_twisted.gif

-K8memphis Posted 15 Jun 2010 , 2:00pm
post #46 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by costumeczar

If it just says almond, then that can't be assumed.




Yes. So op shoulda asked and clarified. Since white to me is the default color of a wedding then I think the bride was justified in her complaint and I rarely bow to bride whims.

But white and yellow are legitimate 'flavors'. Which is why you gotta be careful with that. Even though most of the bakeries I've worked at just added yellow food color to white cake. icon_lol.gif
However if it wasn't a wedding cake then all bets are off.

carmijok Posted 15 Jun 2010 , 2:00pm
post #47 of 72

When I was doing tastings for the bakery I worked for, we presented our 'white' cake. It was French Vanilla so it wasn't pure white. I told the brides that if they wanted a pure white cake we could do it, but it might be a bit drier in texture (this is what the bakers told me). They generally went for the vanilla...but they knew what to expect. Whenever someone was upset (which fortunately did not happen often at all) we would give them a $25 gift certificate to be applied toward their next order of whatever they wanted. Your bride was only unhappy with the color of her cake. It was a misunderstanding and any goodwill on your part should reflect the minimal 'damage' that was done.
I personally like the idea of an anniversary top tier. To me that would be more than fair. But anything you do should be appreciated (unless she's a total B). My guess is you'll be pinning brides down about cake color from now on, huh? LOL! icon_lol.gif

aandsmommy Posted 15 Jun 2010 , 2:21pm
post #48 of 72

I already do a complimentary fresh anniversary tier in a year...hence the cupcakes now. Yes, I will be nailing down the color from here on out icon_wink.gif

costumeczar Posted 15 Jun 2010 , 2:29pm
post #49 of 72

I would never assume that weddings would automatically require a white cake, though. I rarely do white cake for weddings anymore, most people want somethng more interesting flavor-wise. I don't use food coloring, but different cakes are different colors, so a wedding cake HAVING to be white wouldn't even occur to me.

aandsmommy Posted 15 Jun 2010 , 2:31pm
post #50 of 72

yes, i never heard of the white automatically for weddings. I actually don't think I have ever eaten white cake at a wedding...and I certainly never had made one.

-K8memphis Posted 15 Jun 2010 , 2:39pm
post #51 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by costumeczar

I would never assume that weddings would automatically require a white cake, though. I rarely do white cake for weddings anymore, most people want somethng more interesting flavor-wise. I don't use food coloring, but different cakes are different colors, so a wedding cake HAVING to be white wouldn't even occur to me.




I do. I'm coming from an almost 40 year pro cake carreer (sh*t am I that old?)

So back in the day--white cake was the only flavor. My inner caker was born during the white cake age. I always 'splain the difference to the bride--that the cake and icing are made from butter and real vanilla ergo not pure white. It might not be a factor at all to her but it's part of my repertoire.

I'm so old, black on wedding cakes still shock & awes my inner caker. black whaaaat?

icon_lol.gif

mayo2222 Posted 15 Jun 2010 , 2:44pm
post #52 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by aandsmommy

yes, i never heard of the white automatically for weddings. I actually don't think I have ever eaten white cake at a wedding...and I certainly never had made one.




Really? Because I think the only cake I've ever had at weddings besides chocolate is white cake.

moralna Posted 15 Jun 2010 , 3:05pm
post #53 of 72

I guess I am having a hard time understanding here . . . she got the cake flavor and filling she wanted. Okay, so the cake was not white white, but you said you mentioned to her that it would not be completely white. I can see if the icing or fondant color was not what she wanted and it threw off the color of the wedding scheme, but cutting into a cake and complaining that it was not completely white -c'mon - I am sorry, I think that it is ridiculous. It's not like she cut into a cake and it was red or orange or something. . .

-K8memphis Posted 15 Jun 2010 , 3:13pm
post #54 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by moralna

I guess I am having a hard time understanding here . . . she got the cake flavor and filling she wanted. Okay, so the cake was not white white, but you said you mentioned to her that it would not be completely white. I can see if the icing or fondant color was not what she wanted and it threw off the color of the wedding scheme, but cutting into a cake and complaining that it was not completely white -c'mon - I am sorry, I think that it is ridiculous. It's not like she cut into a cake and it was red or orange or something. . .




She told her in advance it would not be white?
I din catch that anywhere.

moralna Posted 15 Jun 2010 , 3:24pm
post #55 of 72

In an earlier post, she wrote. . . "I never use shortening, so I never could have made a brilliant white cake. She did know this, but I also should have clarified further" . . . .so the person did know that the cake would not be white, white.

-K8memphis Posted 15 Jun 2010 , 3:27pm
post #56 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by moralna

In an earlier post, she wrote. . . "I never use shortening, so I never could have made a brilliant white cake. She did know this, but I also should have clarified further" . . . .so the person did know that the cake would not be white, white.




It's been my experience that non-cakers can't add that up.

I mean yellow butter comes from white milk cream in the first place.

I can make a white cake with butter and real vanilla and some egg yolks.

Cake muggles don't add & subtract like this.
That's why they get a professional.

costumeczar Posted 15 Jun 2010 , 3:30pm
post #57 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by mayo2222

Quote:
Originally Posted by aandsmommy

yes, i never heard of the white automatically for weddings. I actually don't think I have ever eaten white cake at a wedding...and I certainly never had made one.



Really? Because I think the only cake I've ever had at weddings besides chocolate is white cake.




I rarely make white cake for weddings, that's really old school. People used to be given the choice of white, white or white. Or vanilla pound. Now people watch food shows and have seen that there's more than white cake out there, so they usually choose something else.

SweetResults Posted 15 Jun 2010 , 3:49pm
post #58 of 72

RoccosMom:
I really love the way you post icon_smile.gif
And I must agree, even with my sarcastic post, that I do remember that back in the day wedding cakes being mostly white.

-K8memphis Posted 15 Jun 2010 , 3:54pm
post #59 of 72

Sure. Doesn't mean it's not the industry standard just 'cause there's new ideas. Most flavor charts on websites start with white & yellow. Like yours. Old school white is your first flavor. That didn't happen by accident.

Expectations are expectations. Maybe old school but it's still predominant. To me it's the wrong flavor/kind of cake than what was ordered. Was it ambiguous yes. And the caker lost. I'd refund something.

I love a good debate.

costumeczar Posted 15 Jun 2010 , 3:55pm
post #60 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by SweetResults

RoccosMom:
I really love the way you post icon_smile.gif
And I must agree, even with my sarcastic post, that I do remember that back in the day wedding cakes being mostly white.




I have to say that the tiny type really irritates me, K8! It doesn't help those of use who are nearsighted!

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