What's So Big About Wasc Cake? Honest Question..

Decorating By LuvLyrics Updated 17 Jun 2010 , 9:06pm by multilayered

LuvLyrics Posted 13 Jun 2010 , 6:07pm
post #1 of 66

Sorry if the question sounds sarcastic, I promise it's not my intention. I really want to know what is all the buzz about WASC cake? I've never had it, so I don't know what the texture or flavor should be. Do you prefer it to carve? or is it the flavor? Is there a recipe from scratch than anyone wants to share or guide me to it? Or is the only way using a cake mix?

Sorry if the subject came up before, I am just want to educate myself on the subject and give it a try this week

Thanks
Anna

65 replies
Rose_N_Crantz Posted 13 Jun 2010 , 7:04pm
post #2 of 66

It's really yummy.

I've also found it's a good way to kinda "ease" someone into scratch cakes who has been having grocery store/box mix cakes their whole life.

Jeep_girl816 Posted 13 Jun 2010 , 7:28pm
post #3 of 66

It's just a really nice, firm textured cake, that's good for carving, stacking, you name it. Not to mention it can be adapted to just about any flavor you can dream up.

Smashme Posted 13 Jun 2010 , 8:51pm
post #4 of 66

my brother and his bride to be are on a budget and would like me to make there cake.....the only problem i have with this is i live at high altitude, so my baking is totaly different. I would like to make the wasc, is there any thing from the recipe on here that i could change to make it a little extra special...or is it good enough the way it is.

tracycakes Posted 14 Jun 2010 , 2:00am
post #5 of 66

It is BE FAR, my most popular cake. I've had 2 different grooms state that they don't eat cake, but once they tried it, they said that's what they were having. All of my customers like it. I have a couple of changes. I use whole eggs and only 1/2 the amount of almond the recipe calls for. It has good texture and great flavor!

ninjacaker Posted 14 Jun 2010 , 2:09am
post #6 of 66

Super moist, yummy almond flavor, dense but not heavy. Easy to make. My most popular cake by far.

snarkybaker Posted 14 Jun 2010 , 2:09am
post #7 of 66

It's a modified cake mix, and there's nothing really special about it. It's not any better or worse than any of the recipes in the Cake Mix Doctor, which are all modified cake mixes.

SillyJacs Posted 14 Jun 2010 , 2:22am
post #8 of 66

I just made this cake for the first time today and I love it. It tastes great and I can already see how you can make so many variations to it. When i was researching this cake and trying to decide whether or not to use it someone told me to make sure to use the "original" wasc recipe posted by kakeladi. I think I will forever use this cake but I'm just a hobby baker. My motto is to try everything until you find what works for you.

madgeowens Posted 14 Jun 2010 , 2:30am
post #9 of 66

It makes the cake denser nice for carving a cake, and its nice and moist.

cownsj Posted 14 Jun 2010 , 2:48am
post #10 of 66

I'm glad you asked this question. I've wondered the same thing myself, but never thought to ask.

Now that I know this much, and I'm reading about the almond flavor, do you use it mainly for wedding cakes, or for everything?

Loucinda Posted 14 Jun 2010 , 3:03am
post #11 of 66

I have had many folks who say they "don't like cake" try this, and LOVE it. It is my most popular flavor. I once even had a groom that told me even if they couldn't afford my cakes, he was telling everyone else to come to me to get theirs, because it was soooo good! icon_smile.gif I get compliments on it at EVERY cake tasting.

mamawrobin Posted 14 Jun 2010 , 3:09am
post #12 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by cownsj

I'm glad you asked this question. I've wondered the same thing myself, but never thought to ask.

Now that I know this much, and I'm reading about the almond flavor, do you use it mainly for wedding cakes, or for everything?




I love kakeladi's WASC recipe. I've tried some of the others but I really didn't care much for any of them.
I never use almond flavoring because I cannot stand the taste of it. I always use vanilla so I guess mine is really WVSC cake.lol:

LuvLyrics Posted 14 Jun 2010 , 3:26am
post #13 of 66

Thanks to everyone for the replies, I was out of the house and had not seen all the replies icon_smile.gif

I will make it this week, and let you all know, I guess I'll use kakeladi's recipe since seems to be the fave here !

Thanks again
Anna

LuvLyrics Posted 14 Jun 2010 , 3:27am
post #14 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rose_N_Crantz

It's really yummy.

I've also found it's a good way to kinda "ease" someone into scratch cakes who has been having grocery store/box mix cakes their whole life.




Do you have a scratch recipe ?

cheriej Posted 14 Jun 2010 , 3:43am
post #15 of 66

I kept reading about WASC so I made it finally and everyone who tried it said it was the best cake they ever had! I don't get it and I also am not a big fan of almond flavor but that seemed to make people like it more. It's just a very moist (because of the sour cream), dense cake with a nice crumb. Haven't tried chocolate yet but am going to do that soon.

cownsj Posted 14 Jun 2010 , 3:44am
post #16 of 66

I guess I'm going to have to look up the recipe now and give it a try. And I'll try both the WASC AND the WVSC recipes.... LOL I love having neighbors who will try my experiments and give an honest opinion too.

noahsmummy Posted 14 Jun 2010 , 3:49am
post #17 of 66

i think its the versatility and ease of it as well.
speaking of which, does anyone know of a good way to turn it into a really appley cake? i thought i could sub the water for apple juice, but im not sure if it will be strong enough.. then i thought maybe i could change the s. cream to apple sauce.. but im pretty sure i need the dairy in it.. ahhh. any help appreciated.

cheatize Posted 14 Jun 2010 , 3:59am
post #18 of 66

Seriouscakes' scratch version is on the google doc here:
http://docs.google.com/Doc?id=df4f9hbq_46cs9f28fs

adonisthegreek1 Posted 14 Jun 2010 , 4:00am
post #19 of 66

Perhaps, I should go back and give it another try. I baked it a couple of years ago, and did not particularly care for it.

shannonlovebug Posted 14 Jun 2010 , 4:04am
post #20 of 66

I guess I'm the oddball because I'm not a fan. I've made it a few times and it has always given me problems. It's almost too moist, it always falls apart on me when I tort or carve it, it's SUPER crumby, and SUPER heavy, and it tends to stick to the pan. I really don't think it tastes any better than my other doctored cake mixes either.

AuntieE Posted 14 Jun 2010 , 4:07am
post #21 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by noahsmummy

i think its the versatility and ease of it as well.
speaking of which, does anyone know of a good way to turn it into a really appley cake? i thought i could sub the water for apple juice, but im not sure if it will be strong enough.. then i thought maybe i could change the s. cream to apple sauce.. but im pretty sure i need the dairy in it.. ahhh. any help appreciated.




Why not just put real apple chunks in it? Just be sure it's a sweet apple.

tweeter_bug98 Posted 14 Jun 2010 , 4:09am
post #22 of 66

I made a WASC cake for the first time a few weeks ago and fell in love. I am a hobby baker, and was in search of a good white cake recipe that didn't come from a box (Not that there is anything wrong with box cake mixes, I enjoy them too!). I found the WASC cake to be a little denser but very moist, and the crumb was great on it. But the flavor was probably my favorite part. icon_smile.gif Good luck!

mamawrobin Posted 14 Jun 2010 , 4:23am
post #23 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by shannonlovebug

I guess I'm the oddball because I'm not a fan. I've made it a few times and it has always given me problems. It's almost too moist, it always falls apart on me when I tort or carve it, it's SUPER crumby, and SUPER heavy, and it tends to stick to the pan. I really don't think it tastes any better than my other doctored cake mixes either.




I thought the same thing until I tried the "original" WASC recipe by kakeladi. The other ones were wet, sticky, gummy, and super heavy like you stated.
I love her recipe and it's my most requested cake. There isn't as much liquid in her recipe and no oil. It really is a good cake. thumbs_up.gif

SeriousCakes Posted 15 Jun 2010 , 1:49am
post #24 of 66

I get rave reviews from mine too, it's just this recipe:
http://cakecentral.com/recipes/7267/easy-yellow-cake
but I swap out half the milk for sour cream and use almond extract instead of vanilla icon_biggrin.gif

Cakepro Posted 15 Jun 2010 , 2:45am
post #25 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by shannonlovebug

It's almost too moist, it always falls apart on me when I tort or carve it, it's SUPER crumby, and SUPER heavy, and it tends to stick to the pan.




You must be doing something wrong. I've baked several hundred WASC cakes of all flavor variations in the past few of months in my bakery and they certainly don't turn out as you describe, thankfully. I use Rebecca Sutterby's version.

Rose_N_Crantz Posted 15 Jun 2010 , 2:54am
post #26 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by LuvLyrics

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rose_N_Crantz

It's really yummy.

I've also found it's a good way to kinda "ease" someone into scratch cakes who has been having grocery store/box mix cakes their whole life.



Do you have a scratch recipe ?




Yep, I've found a good scratch recipe that I like.

BlakesCakes Posted 15 Jun 2010 , 3:01am
post #27 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cakepro

........they certainly don't turn out as you describe, thankfully. I use Rebecca Sutterby's version.




Me, too.

I find the cake to have a wonderful crumb and to be great for carving. I also like the fact that I can torte layers and pick them up without them breaking easily.

This is the link to the recipe I use all of the time for all flavors--and it halves beautifully, too.

http://cakecentral.com/recipes/2322/white-almond-sour-cream-cake-wasc

Rae

Honeychild Posted 15 Jun 2010 , 3:03am
post #28 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by AuntieE

Quote:
Originally Posted by noahsmummy

i think its the versatility and ease of it as well.
speaking of which, does anyone know of a good way to turn it into a really appley cake? i thought i could sub the water for apple juice, but im not sure if it will be strong enough.. then i thought maybe i could change the s. cream to apple sauce.. but im pretty sure i need the dairy in it.. ahhh. any help appreciated.



Why not just put real apple chunks in it? Just be sure it's a sweet apple.




I'm thinking of apple upside down cake. Maybe torting it and re-layer it so that the apple part is in between the layers...

Ren715 Posted 15 Jun 2010 , 8:31am
post #29 of 66

I love it....especially when I make a lemon cake and add lemon extract. It's super yummy. I play around with the extracts....a little almond, a little vanilla and then maybe lemon or another.

I always make an extra lemon cake (single layer) without frosting. I keep it in the refrigerator and we eat it like pound cake. It's soooo good!

PiccoloChellie Posted 15 Jun 2010 , 9:00am
post #30 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by noahsmummy

i think its the versatility and ease of it as well.
speaking of which, does anyone know of a good way to turn it into a really appley cake? i thought i could sub the water for apple juice, but im not sure if it will be strong enough.. then i thought maybe i could change the s. cream to apple sauce.. but im pretty sure i need the dairy in it.. ahhh. any help appreciated.




I would replace the water with apple cider and swirl in some apple butter once its in the pan. I do a breakfast cake similar to this - basic yellow cake batter, and I swirl in homemade apple butter. Sometimes I'll add a crumb topping too. It's quite apple-y tasting!


If you're feeling particularly industrious, here's my recipe for apple butter. Couldn't be simpler, and makes a fantastic filling for spice cake!


Crockpot Apple Butter
5lbs apples - peeled, cored & rough chopped
1 1/2 cups white sugar
1 1/2 cups brown sugar, packed
1 tablespoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon nutmeg, fresh
two pinches salt

Preheat Crockpot (5qt or larger) on high heat while you do the prep.
In a large bowl, mix together sugars and seasonings.
Peel and core the apples, then chop them roughly into approximate 1" pieces. Dump the apples into the sugar mixture and toss or stir to coat.
Dump everything into the Crockpot.
Cover and cook for 1 hour.
After an hour has passed, the apples will have given off a fair amount of liquid. Stir, replace lid, and reduce the heat to low.
Continue cooking for another 9 hours on low, stirring occasionally.
Uncover the Crockpot and cook an additional 1-2 hours, or until the apple butter is no longer watery and is a nice, dark mahogany brown.
Turn off the heat and let the apple butter cool at room temperature for an hour.
Using an immersion blender or food processor, puree the apple butter smooth.
Divide into freezer safe containers; this lasts for many months in the freezer, so only keep a small amount in the refrigerator at a time

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