Question For The Experts

Decorating By Marcelita Updated 14 Jun 2010 , 6:00pm by Donnagardner

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Marcelita Posted 13 Jun 2010 , 1:07am
post #1 of 8

Why, oh why, do air bubbles happen when using a crusting buttercream?

I just want to understand what I did wrong

icon_cry.gif

Thanks!

7 replies
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KathysCC Posted 13 Jun 2010 , 1:23am
post #2 of 8

Do you mean air bubbles in the icing itself or air bubbles forming under the icing after it is on the cake?

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Marcelita Posted 14 Jun 2010 , 4:02pm
post #3 of 8

Sorry for not being more clear on my post. Yes, I mean the air bubbles that form under the icing after it is on the cake.

I'm just trying to learn from my mistakes, but being a complete newbie, I find it hard to understand why this happens.

Thanks a lot for any help and/or advice

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mamawrobin Posted 14 Jun 2010 , 4:12pm
post #4 of 8

Is your cake cold or partially frozen when ice it?

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Marcelita Posted 14 Jun 2010 , 4:17pm
post #5 of 8

No, it was not cold when I iced it. I crumb coated, refrigerated it, brought it back to room temp and then iced it. I also noticed you posted on my cake disaster picture on early Saturday (about the air bubble) and you suggested that it might be a weak support, but I used a cake board that is half an inch thick, so I don't think that was the problem either...

Thank you so much for posting! I really appreciate the comments.

Marcela

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tiggy2 Posted 14 Jun 2010 , 4:28pm
post #6 of 8

The cake needs to settle for several hours after it has been filled before icing it. Use a stiff damn between the layers, fill, crumb coat, then let settle.

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KathysCC Posted 14 Jun 2010 , 5:41pm
post #7 of 8

After you stack and fill the cake, you can push down on it to help remove some of the air. Make sure you use a good icing dam, that your dam and filling are even and that you let the cake settle some before icing.

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Donnagardner Posted 14 Jun 2010 , 6:00pm
post #8 of 8

I have had bubbles form underneath my buttercream after it sits overnight and I have been told it is from the cake itself letting out air. I poke a small hole in the middle of the bubble and smooth it back out and all is ok then. I have noticed too that if I dont apply the icing firmly sometimes it will not adhere to the crumb coat and cause this too. Good luck and I am sure and expert will reply and tell you just how to fix it.

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