Question About Covering 3D Cakes With Fondant

Decorating By frankdiabetes Updated 13 Jun 2010 , 4:09am by Kitagrl

frankdiabetes Posted 12 Jun 2010 , 10:43pm
post #1 of 8

I made a cat cake this morning and had a great deal of trouble with covering it with fondant. I had previously watched a video of Elisa Strauss covering a dog cake by wrapping the fondant around rather than covering from the top.

My question is, how do you get rid of that seam? I am not proud of how this turned out, should I have covered it from the top? The head is separate, covered separately and on its own board.

The cake can be seen below, you can see the fondant seam along his front. I tried to do it how Sharon does in her videos, to cut through both layers and then smooth them together but it's still quite visible. Argh!
LL

7 replies
cakesrock Posted 12 Jun 2010 , 11:56pm
post #2 of 8

That is really cute! I think you did a good job. I still really struggle with seams, myself. I always try to cover from the top if at all possible. When I have used Sharons seam technique, it never looks nearly as good as hers...just keep practicing is all I can say! I wish I had some more tips for you. icon_smile.gif

cheatize Posted 13 Jun 2010 , 3:06am
post #3 of 8

I don't know, but I've been experimenting. Mine never "rubs out," which I've read a lot that it's supposed to do. So far, applying heat seems to help but it changes the look of the fondant a bit and I have to rub shortening on it to get it to look okay again.

hollyml Posted 13 Jun 2010 , 3:11am
post #4 of 8

I don't know how to make the seam disappear, but I'd think you can work around it for many designs...in this case, for example, you could have brought the white at the cat's neck farther down onto its chest, and covered the seam with that.

I think it's great anyway. icon_smile.gif The cat's head is wonderful!

frankdiabetes Posted 13 Jun 2010 , 3:29am
post #5 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by hollyml

You could have brought the white at the cat's neck farther down onto its chest, and covered the seam with that.

I think it's great anyway. icon_smile.gif The cat's head is wonderful!




Thanks! I thought about bringing the white fur down to cover the seam, but I was modeling it after a specific cat who has only a small white bib.

I think I agree with most, though, that the best way to deal with seams is to try to avoid making seams in the first place.

mayo2222 Posted 13 Jun 2010 , 3:50am
post #6 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by cakesrock

That is really cute! I think you did a good job. I still really struggle with seams, myself. I always try to cover from the top if at all possible. When I have used Sharons seam technique, it never looks nearly as good as hers...just keep practicing is all I can say! I wish I had some more tips for you. icon_smile.gif




What is Sharon's seam technique?

Polkadot79 Posted 13 Jun 2010 , 3:56am
post #7 of 8

I've read/saw somewhere that modeling chocolate is better for 3-D because you can "smooth" the seams out.

Kitagrl Posted 13 Jun 2010 , 4:09am
post #8 of 8

You can use royal icing to "caulk" a seam and then rub your finger over it to smooth. Try to match the royal to your fondant, or seam white fondant and then airbrush.

I have quite a few 3D cakes in my photos...some need seams "caulked", others I have decorations able to cover the seams. For instance, in this case, you could have added a bow around the cat's neck, with a few ribbons flowing down, conveniently across the seamed areas. icon_smile.gif Or even a collar with a lower hanging "tag".

Really cute!

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