The Cake Bible!!!

Decorating By Kitagrl Updated 18 Apr 2014 , 8:24pm by morganchampagne

Kitagrl Posted 12 Jun 2010 , 9:06pm
post #1 of 71

I finally bought "The Cake Bible"!!!!


I mostly bought it for all the "science" of the recipes...but can anyone tell me if the actual cake recipes, especially the vanilla ones, are really moist and good? What about the pound cake?

Some of the fillings look really nice too...alot of basic recipes that every caker will eventually need...

Looks like the kind of book I just need to sit down and read it cover to cover!!!! Lots of good stuff in there.

70 replies
CakesByLJ Posted 13 Jun 2010 , 12:32am
post #2 of 71

I love the recipes in it~! The Perfect Pound cake to the White Chocolate Whisper cake. Her curd recipes are great too. You will get others who do not like her methods though... so, try some, and decide for yourself... icon_biggrin.gif

Btrfly578 Posted 13 Jun 2010 , 12:58am
post #3 of 71

Where can I get this Cake Bible?

Kitagrl Posted 13 Jun 2010 , 1:00am
post #4 of 71

I got it at a local Borders but its probably cheaper at amazon.com or something...somebody bought it for me today as a gift.

kathyx1 Posted 13 Jun 2010 , 1:18am
post #5 of 71

I have this book and I LOVE it!! I'd love to work my way through it but as always, not enough time but everything I've made so far has turned out great.

nelikate Posted 13 Jun 2010 , 1:50am
post #6 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by kathyx1

I have this book and I LOVE it!! I'd love to work my way through it but as always, not enough time but everything I've made so far has turned out great.




Kathyx1

Do you have the American or UK version? Have you had to change any of the quantities for Australian ingredients?

I ask because I heard the American version doesn't work in the UK so they had to do a UK version and I think our measurements & ingredients are similar to the UK rather than USA.

My BF got me the American version but I haven't tried anything yet.

Nel

Marianna46 Posted 13 Jun 2010 , 2:21am
post #7 of 71

I have what must be the American version of the Cake Bible (I got it from amazon.com in the US), but I don't quite understand why it wouldn't work in the UK or Australia. All measurements are given by volume (cups, teaspoons, tablespoons, etc.) and by weight, both in English and metric units. It seems to me that the only thing that needs to be converted are the oven temperatures, which - strangely enough - are only given in Fahrenheit. Just out of curiousity, what other problems are there from the UK/Australian standpoint?

nelikate Posted 13 Jun 2010 , 2:40am
post #8 of 71

Marianna,

The flour in the UK is different to the flour in US. So is the butter, cheese and other ingredients. We don't have Crisco in Australia and many other differences.

I know it sounds weird when you think butter & cheese are from cows milk - how can it be different? but is the processes and the additives different countries use or add. Same with the flour.

Here is the link to the authors comments on reproducing The Cake Bible for the UK.

http://www.realbakingwithrose.com/2006/07/crossing_the_atlantic_by_cookb.html#more

Nel

Marianna46 Posted 13 Jun 2010 , 2:50am
post #9 of 71

Thanks for the information, nelikate,this is just fascinating. I guess I shouldn't be too surprised: I live right next door to the US in Mexico and many things are different here, including the flour! (Although it works okay for most American cake recipes, but I can't get "cake flour" here to save my life). I can't really make marshmallow fondant because marshmallows are made so differently here, too. And thanks a million for the link to Rose Levy Beranbaum's blog - I've put the gingerbread recipe in my favorites!

Loucinda Posted 13 Jun 2010 , 2:59am
post #10 of 71

I have it for a reference. I didn't much care for the recipes. The fondant recipe isn't bad though. It was one of the first "cake" books I ever bought. She also has a newsletter you can sign up for that you get electronically.

Kitagrl Posted 13 Jun 2010 , 3:04am
post #11 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by Loucinda

I have it for a reference. I didn't much care for the recipes. The fondant recipe isn't bad though. It was one of the first "cake" books I ever bought. She also has a newsletter you can sign up for that you get electronically.




I thought all her tips and hints about ingredients would help me if I'm ever changing a recipe or adding things...and some of her filling recipes looked good, even some of the basic ones that its good to have on hand.

I guess I didn't buy it so much for the recipes as for the other information in there...but thought if there were a few good recipes, all the better!

Joyfull4444 Posted 13 Jun 2010 , 3:30am
post #12 of 71

I resisted buying the Cake Bible because of reading about adjustments that needed to be done in some of the the cake recipes in the book. If you don't know to go to Roses blog, you wont know the proper adjustments that need to be made and your cake might not work. I was hoping Rose would come out with a revised edition of the cake bible with any corrections, but her book Heavenly cakes came out instead.

If you want to check out the adjustments, or errata, in the Cake Bible book click on the link.

http://www.realbakingwithrose.com/book_errata/

Kitagrl Posted 13 Jun 2010 , 3:34am
post #13 of 71

Thanks! I'll print the stuff and add it with the book.

suzannesaucepan Posted 13 Jun 2010 , 8:12am
post #14 of 71

Just bought the cake bible afetr reading on the net about all the hype. She has some fantastic sounding recipes in there. So far gave only made the downy yellow cake which came out beautifully, with an extremely fine almost powder soft texture. Not the cake to use for carving! But after I froze it, and tested it after a week, the texture was perfect (and it was so tasty!) went great with the Italian Meringue Buttercream I also had on hand.

FleurDeCake Posted 13 Jun 2010 , 9:50am
post #15 of 71

I just went to Rose's web page, and after looking at all those changes and modifications . I can't even imagine buying The Cake Bible...it all seemd so complicated and way too much adjusting

regymusic Posted 13 Jun 2010 , 12:00pm
post #16 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by Loucinda

I have it for a reference. I didn't much care for the recipes. The fondant recipe isn't bad though. It was one of the first "cake" books I ever bought. She also has a newsletter you can sign up for that you get electronically.




I absolutely love some of her recipes and can leave others. For me, the cake recipes that I tried were not so great. The recipes for neoclassic butter (no temp readings required), her ganaches with variations depending upon your needs, and the biscuit roulade, barvarian cream recipes to name a few are absolutely indespensible.

That said, the bottom line for me is that I have two copies of her Cake Bible. One for the kitchen, and one for the bed room which I use when I have an idea and want to do research (in the wee hours of the morning).

tracycakes Posted 14 Jun 2010 , 2:09am
post #17 of 71

I don't care for the cake recipes at all. I still want to try some of the other recipes, like fondant and fillings though.

confectionsofahousewife Posted 14 Jun 2010 , 2:23am
post #18 of 71

I love it! I read it cover to cover also. I haven't tried that many of the recipes but I like her downy yellow cake and the white chocolate whisper cake. I did not care for her chocolate cake (can't remember the name but its very similar to the downy yellow cake, just chocolate) as it is not quite chocolatey enough for me. I found myself wanting even more baking science, though, after reading it so I got Shirley Corriher's Bakwise a few weeks ago. I'm still in the process of reading it cover to cover (I've been busy). I'd like to eventually get to where I can design my own recipes because I know how the ingredients interact with each other and in what proportions they should be.

Kitagrl Posted 14 Jun 2010 , 2:28am
post #19 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by confectionsofahousewife

I love it! I read it cover to cover also. I haven't tried that many of the recipes but I like her downy yellow cake and the white chocolate whisper cake. I did not care for her chocolate cake (can't remember the name but its very similar to the downy yellow cake, just chocolate) as it is not quite chocolatey enough for me. I found myself wanting even more baking science, though, after reading it so I got Shirley Corriher's Bakwise a few weeks ago. I'm still in the process of reading it cover to cover (I've been busy). I'd like to eventually get to where I can design my own recipes because I know how the ingredients interact with each other and in what proportions they should be.




Yes this is what I'm interested in too! That or starting with a recipe that is kinda good and being able to tweak it until its amazing.

I have a few scratch recipes that are outstanding but I still use doctored cake mixes for vanilla so far. I cannot find a yellow or white cake from scratch that I like better than a doctored mix. So I'm kinda on a vague quest to either find or create one. I know between my four boys, and cake orders, it will be a long time before I'm studied up enough to do so. haha.

I still have people tell me that my doctored box mixes are the "best cake they've ever had" so for now its good..but it would be nice to eventually replace it with a scratch recipe that is even bester. haha.

-K8memphis Posted 14 Jun 2010 , 2:46am
post #20 of 71

I'm not crazy about the Cake Bible.

One thought to share with you all--the deal she gets into about baking powder whatever that is all about--all of the commercial bakers I've ever worked for or known just multiply out all the ingredients without any of that baking powder mumbo jumbo of hers.

I got my daughter the Dorie Greenspan baking book--she loves it--and man can that girl bake!

http://www.amazon.com/dp/0618443363/?tag=cakecentral-20

I also think Nick Maglieri's book, Perfect Cakes, is a wonderful compendium of great cakes.

http://www.amazon.com/dp/0060198796/?tag=cakecentral-20

ninjacaker Posted 14 Jun 2010 , 3:05am
post #21 of 71

I heart it. Her recipes are finicky, but oh so good.

confectionsofahousewife Posted 14 Jun 2010 , 1:25pm
post #22 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kitagrl


Yes this is what I'm interested in too! That or starting with a recipe that is kinda good and being able to tweak it until its amazing.




Exactly! I just don't feel like I have a good grasp on the baking chemistry just yet. There is so much to remember!
As far as white cake goes, have you tried this recipe?
http://cakecentral.com/recipes/2165/a-better-white-scratch-cake
You probably have but this is the one I use for white cakes. I love it and everyone I have ever fed it to loves it also. Its exactly what I want in a white cake. Its moist with a fine, tender crumb.
Try the downy yellow cake from the cake bible. I don't get a lot of requests for yellow cake but when I do that's the one I use as I haven't found anything better yet. Although, I baked it a month or so ago and could not get it to bake correctly in 6 inch pans. It was weird. But the cakes I baked in 8 inch pans were phenomenal!

Kitagrl Posted 14 Jun 2010 , 2:02pm
post #23 of 71

I'll save the white recipe...I'm kind of looking for something with the same texture as doctored box mix, and roughly the same flavor, but of course minus the "commercial" background taste.

Because everybody seems to love that "bakery style" cake, as I call it...

confectionsofahousewife Posted 14 Jun 2010 , 5:29pm
post #24 of 71

I'm not sure what a doctored mix tastes like (or what you do to doctor yours) but I think this is why people like this recipe. Its scratch but is similar to a boxed wasc without the commercial taste. I just like it because it tastes good icon_biggrin.gif Too bad you don't live close, I've got some here you could come try a slice!

Kitagrl Posted 14 Jun 2010 , 5:37pm
post #25 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by confectionsofahousewife

I'm not sure what a doctored mix tastes like (or what you do to doctor yours) but I think this is why people like this recipe. Its scratch but is similar to a boxed wasc without the commercial taste. I just like it because it tastes good icon_biggrin.gif Too bad you don't live close, I've got some here you could come try a slice!




I wish! haha. I'll have to give it a try!

Does it bake up about the same? Fluffy and rising high?

confectionsofahousewife Posted 15 Jun 2010 , 1:51pm
post #26 of 71

I've never made a doctored mix so I'm not sure how they bake. I'm not sure I would call this recipe fluffy (although I'm not sure I know exactly what that means icon_biggrin.gif ). It will rise nicely above the edges of your pan but you have to fill the pan pretty full. I fill mine probably 3/4 full to get it to rise above the edge.

carmijok Posted 15 Jun 2010 , 2:18pm
post #27 of 71

I'm almost afraid to try a scratch vanilla cake because the recipe I use is just a doctored cake mix and it was the most popular cake at the bakery I worked for. Betty Crocker french vanilla cake (sifted) with a touch of Cream Bouquet. The owner said she'd tried all different types of recipes but this was the most consistent in flavor and texture. And it is! Always moist, stacks and carves well and tastes wonderful. No one ever thought it was from a box. That little touch of Cream Bouquet brings out the vanilla flavor while giving it a touch of citrus. Makes all the difference. Sure makes it a lot easier too! I guess I should branch out, and I want to...but hey, if it ain't broke... icon_biggrin.gif

sweettoothmom1 Posted 15 Jun 2010 , 2:34pm
post #28 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by RoccosMom

I'm not crazy about the Cake Bible.

I got my daughter the Dorie Greenspan baking book--she loves it--and man can that girl bake!

I also think Nick Maglieri's book, Perfect Cakes, is a wonderful compendium of great cakes.




Thanks for these book tips. I am NOT a fan of Cake Bible either. Tried a few and they were dry.

-K8memphis Posted 15 Jun 2010 , 2:51pm
post #29 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by sweettoothmom1

Quote:
Originally Posted by RoccosMom

I'm not crazy about the Cake Bible.

I got my daughter the Dorie Greenspan baking book--she loves it--and man can that girl bake!

I also think Nick Maglieri's book, Perfect Cakes, is a wonderful compendium of great cakes.



Thanks for these book tips. I am NOT a fan of Cake Bible either. Tried a few and they were dry.




Cool--now another really really cool thing is that Dorie Greenspan herself often posts on egullet.org--there's an entire thread about her book and tons of folks' different experiences with her recipes in the baking section I think or the cookbook section. So there's another wealth of information.

Just an aside, but my kid--the red headed girl she's 30--brought me some muffins yesterday at work--they were wonderful--she said, it's a corrupted banana bread recipe--she said she din have enough of this & that ingredient so she substituted this & that other ingredient and wow she's got it down to a science!!! Making stuff up and making it great!!!

nancylee61 Posted 20 Mar 2014 , 5:19pm
post #30 of 71

Hi,

I just bought this, and have to say I am totally flummoxed with the modifications section. I don't know the editor, but wouldn't hire him/her for a book I was writing!! The talks about the factors 3 and factor 8, and then says to multiply all the ingredients by 3 for an 8" cake???  And then there is the baking powder factor. What the heck?? None of it makes any sense at all, and I read it about ten times, and am an English teacher, so supposedly, I can read.

 

Can anyone recommend a good source for changing any of the recipes most commonly shared here for, say, a 14 inch tier? Thanks,

Nancy

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