Aaand This Is Why We Practice...

Decorating By Herekittykitty Updated 16 Jun 2010 , 11:17pm by Herekittykitty

Herekittykitty Posted 8 Jun 2010 , 3:58pm
post #1 of 52

Soooo, I am bad at fondant, really bad. Just don't do it enough (and I'm a bit afraid of it), so I decided to practice.

The results? Almost chucked the cake out the window and learned serveral new, creative ways to string profanities together. tapedshut.gif I never wanted to touch the stuff again. icon_mad.gif

Now that I have taken a step back and calmed down (sort of), I would like to know how in the Sam H you put fondant on a round cake w/o it looking like this:
LL
LL

51 replies
Christy0722 Posted 8 Jun 2010 , 4:05pm
post #2 of 52

I watched a video on youtube from Planet Cake. It shows how to cover a round cake with fondant and it looks so easy. Check it out! HTH!
BTW...I love the bow video they do. It is soooo easy and I can make a bow in less than 4 minutes now!

Herekittykitty Posted 8 Jun 2010 , 4:06pm
post #3 of 52

And after painting it to look, in some crazed, alternate reality, like a checked table cloth; this is the "good side". icon_lol.gif

So apparently I am really bad at painting too. Sigh - I really do have massive delusions of grandure. Any suggestions on this technique as well?

Desperately trying to take another fondant/gumpaste class in the Twin Cities, MN but can't find one that is actually running (last one taken was 3 years ago, and didn't do a round cake). icon_cry.gif
LL

Herekittykitty Posted 8 Jun 2010 , 4:09pm
post #4 of 52

Thanks Christy0722 I'll check it out.

Caths_Cakes Posted 8 Jun 2010 , 4:10pm
post #5 of 52

Your fondant looks a little dry, Did you spend long trying to get it on the cake?

The smoother you get your buttercream or ganache underneath, the smoother your fondant will be.

Roll it out, You dont want it too thick, or its difficult to work with, Too thin and you risk tears. i lift my fondant with the rolling pin and drape it over the cake. The first thing i do is check to make sure i have it in the right place and that all the sides will be covered. Then i secure the very top, with the palm of my hand. then the very top edge, as you work around and down the cake, you need to keep 'lifting' the fondant, so it forms almost like a frill around the cake, almost stretching it out to stop the creases. check out youtube, several people have very good videos for this, Aine2 has an excellent video on it!

Everybody works it differently, it does take practise, my very first fondant cakes looked like yours, now there flawless! i often wonder why people get so upset over it, but then i think, if some one asked me to do an all buttercream cake, id freak out! Please do keep practising because you WILL get better!

Herekittykitty Posted 8 Jun 2010 , 4:17pm
post #6 of 52

Caths: The fondant was actually quite pliable, I only ended up with one tear on the super messy side - which was the last part smoothed. The dry look is cornstarch used to help absorb some of the H2O after sticking the patches on.

I did the draping, smoothing, lifting, stretching blah blah blah (sorry, still feeling a bit snarky about it) but still could not get rid of the fold in the back, no matter what.

I used MMF and don't have a/c so maybe it just got too hot, I may have left my piece of fondant too big - thinking back I think that was a point made during class.... I will definately check out youtube for some videos.

Thanks for reading my vent.

luv_to_decorate Posted 8 Jun 2010 , 4:22pm
post #7 of 52

I don't work with fondant much because everyone around my neck of the woods likes buttercream. I did take a great class on fondant and I don't have any problems. We were taught to roll the fondat between 2 large sheets of vinyl. You take off the top sheet and use the bottom sheet to position your fondant on the cake. And you gently roll it off the sheet and stretch the fondant out away from the cake like making a hoop shirt around the cake. Gently and slowly work the fondant down from the top, taking your time. Make sure the bottom of the fondat is still out in a circle away from the cake and keeping it stretched out with no bulges. You will have plenty of fondant away from the cake and you will be able to trim it off and have a smooth bottom. Practice is the key.

metria Posted 8 Jun 2010 , 4:31pm
post #8 of 52

couple suggestions:

* cut your cake circle exactly the size of your cake
* roll your fondant a little thinner
* elevate your cake with something smaller underneath, like a shallow cereal bowl (put a non-skid mat on it so your cake won't slide off!)
* roll out fondant larger than required to cover the cake
* coast your fondant down the sides. let gravity and your hands gently help it stretch and conform to the sides. if it's folding/ruffling on you, gently pull it away from the cake and try again.

ConnieJ Posted 8 Jun 2010 , 4:33pm
post #9 of 52

I think your painted cake came out great!

Tracy7953 Posted 8 Jun 2010 , 4:35pm
post #10 of 52

When I first worked with fondant, I had some of the same problems. Maybe if you tried doing a shorter, wider cake (like maybe one 8" round 2" high) first and practice working down the sides it may be a bit easier. Youtube has tons of fondant videos to watch as well. Keep trying!

leah_s Posted 8 Jun 2010 , 4:40pm
post #11 of 52

agree with metria,
First, that cardboard circle is way too big. And contrary to others, i roll my fondant a bit on the thick side, because I think its easier to work it that way.

Meh, whatever works.

Herekittykitty Posted 8 Jun 2010 , 4:53pm
post #12 of 52

Good tip about the cake board. It is a 6" board for a 6" cake but I had to trim the bottom 2 layers b/c it was bulging. Next time, trim board too.

Umm.... how do you do that when the cake is already on it? I am assuming take it off and follow the mark it left?

Rose_N_Crantz Posted 8 Jun 2010 , 5:02pm
post #13 of 52

I'm from the Twin Cities too!!! Yay!!!!

I had a bear of a time getting the hang of fondant. It still freaks me out to be honest. I had always tried to pull and smooth the fondant around all sides at the same time. That doesn't make sense. What I used to do was pull and smooth about in inch or so from the top all the way around. When I get back to where I started I would move down another inch or so. I kept getting wrinkles so I had one of my cousins come over who had taken a class and show me how she does hers.

She smooths all the way to the bottom on one side then moves to the next side and smooths all the way to the bottom. I tried it and the first time came out perfect! But because I don't use fondant all the time I still am a little sketchy.

Oh, and you don't have to take the cake off to trim the board. Just place it on the bowl thingy that someone above suggested and trim away with an exacto knife. It actually goes a lot smoother than you think it would.

stacyllind Posted 8 Jun 2010 , 5:13pm
post #14 of 52

I work with MMF quite a bit and that is EXACTLY what my first cake with it looked like and I am pretty sure that I invented a whole new language of profanities also!!! Now I am just super careful and smooth it down to the bottom on one side and then move on to the next, that way it is not pulling to much and stretching where I don't want it to and it seems to work great now so hang in there!

I am from the twin cities area too and I have also been looking for some classes and have come up with the same problem icon_sad.gif I'm not sure if you have ever been to Lynn's Cake and Candy Supply but I know they offer different ones all of the time but their summer schedule isn't out yet. Here is the website if you're interested! http://www.lynnscakeandcandy.com/12301.html

Herekittykitty Posted 8 Jun 2010 , 5:55pm
post #15 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by stacyllind


I am from the twin cities area too and I have also been looking for some classes and have come up with the same problem icon_sad.gif I'm not sure if you have ever been to Lynn's Cake and Candy Supply but I know they offer different ones all of the time but their summer schedule isn't out yet. Here is the website if you're interested! http://www.lynnscakeandcandy.com/12301.html





Are they open to the public? When Sweet Celebrations went out of business I almost cried. icon_cry.gif I am out of a bunch of Americolors and disco dust and have been too lazy to order on line. icon_lol.gificon_lol.gificon_lol.gif Plus it would be nice to have some local options other than Michael's and Joann's for supplies.

Herekittykitty Posted 8 Jun 2010 , 5:58pm
post #16 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rose_N_Crantz

I'm from the Twin Cities too!!! Yay!!!!

Oh, and you don't have to take the cake off to trim the board. Just place it on the bowl thingy that someone above suggested and trim away with an exacto knife. It actually goes a lot smoother than you think it would.




I remembered reading in another thread that you were from MN and wondered if it was the cities. I have been dying to know, which store you work at - R, C or B?

Thank you for the trimming tip. thumbs_up.gif I have never done this b/c all the cakes I make are "Themed" and I use the board as part of the display.

stacyllind Posted 8 Jun 2010 , 6:04pm
post #17 of 52

They are open to the public and ever since I found that store I think I have just been coming up with excuses to go there and buy more stuff icon_smile.gif I know they also offer private lesson's too but I think they are $30/hr. They are located in Fridley but I drive from Lindstrom just to go there because I completely agree with you on needing more options than just Michaels and Joanne!! icon_biggrin.gif

catlharper Posted 8 Jun 2010 , 6:19pm
post #18 of 52

the best tip I ever learned about MMF here was elevating the cake up a bit. I actually use a tipped over a 2" high cake pan one size smaller than the cake I'm making to elevate the cake and then put the fondant over the cake and cut away the excess. This really really helps!

brian1974 Posted 8 Jun 2010 , 6:21pm
post #19 of 52

Fondant = pain in butt.

I make my own MMF based on Tonednas recipie.
Sometimes i have made it and i can roll it out on some confectioners sugar and then use the mat to get it onto the cake and it all goes great, othertimes i will do the exact method and the mmf sticks to the mat (no matter how much sugar is under there and then just tears apart as i try to remove it.
Even tried crisco on the mat and rolling out on that and sometimes it still sticks to that.
People tell you to roll it thin, but with mmf it seems the thinner it gets the more likley it just tears.

I have yet to try and cover a cake in something like satin ice, think il try that next and see if that gives me headaches too.

Id like to know how thin is too thin and how thick is too thick.

In terms of the frilling i found sugarshacks dvds helpfull here, i can at least get a fold free edge now, once i finnaly get the fondant on the cake.

jqorso Posted 8 Jun 2010 , 6:32pm
post #20 of 52

I like to use a can of food to elevate my cakes. Peaches work great because it's heavy so your cake won't topple off. Or if it's a big cake a bunch of tuna fish cans work. Oh and I use that non-slip shelf liner between. Then use scissors or something to get rid of the excess at the bottom so you have less fondant to worry about.

Herekittykitty Posted 8 Jun 2010 , 6:42pm
post #21 of 52

All these tips are so great, I am learning a ton. I just hope I can apply this knowledge.

Non slip liners, love them! I always put my turn table on a glass cake stand so the cake is more on level with me - not that tough when your short - and use the shelf liners to keep it on the stand then another to keep the cake board on the turn table.

stacyllind Posted 8 Jun 2010 , 6:42pm
post #22 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by brian1974

Fondant = pain in butt.

Sometimes i have made it and i can roll it out on some confectioners sugar and then use the mat to get it onto the cake and it all goes great, othertimes i will do the exact method and the mmf sticks to the mat (no matter how much sugar is under there and then just tears apart as i try to remove it.
Even tried crisco on the mat and rolling out on that and sometimes it still sticks to that.




I have had the same problem and now I only use corn starch and it works so much better for me than the powdered sugar or crisco.

Loucinda Posted 8 Jun 2010 , 8:45pm
post #23 of 52

I think the best advice is to go buy some wilton fondant (it is just for practicing here) and cover a cake with that - it is the perfect consistency, and you will learn how it should feel. I think your consistnency/thickness is off - and without taking a class, you are going to have to learn by trial and error.

Another thing is the smaller the cake, the harder to cover....you have one of the toughest sizes to get fondant perfect on for a beginner. Next time try at least using an 8" to cover - and I use a coffee container as my elevated base - wide enough to be stable, and high enough to help with the gravity.

I work my way around and down, I never do one side at at time...that way you don't have a bunch of fondant left on one side to deal with. Gently pull it out and smooth and keep turning it as you go down.

Good luck, and the paint job really doesn't look bad at all!

Herekittykitty Posted 8 Jun 2010 , 9:02pm
post #24 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by Loucinda


Another thing is the smaller the cake, the harder to cover....you have one of the toughest sizes to get fondant perfect on for a beginner. Next time try at least using an 8" to cover - and I use a coffee container as my elevated base - wide enough to be stable, and high enough to help with the gravity.




Ok, so the rest of the practice cakes get various BC's, trying indydebi's and Sugarshack's if I can get hi-ratio and find dream whip. This practice cake has my first attempt at SMBC under the fondant and for filling. Filling is good, but I digress. I will bake off some 8" cakes for fonant trials.

My neighbors and co-workers are going to just LOVE me (who doesn't like free sorta pretty cake).

Rose_N_Crantz Posted 8 Jun 2010 , 9:05pm
post #25 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by Herekittykitty


Are they open to the public? When Sweet Celebrations went out of business I almost cried. icon_cry.gif




Right? I remember when I learned it was closing. I went over to pick up some stuff, can't even remember what it was I was looking for, when I walk up and see a huge closing sign. The shelves were practically picked clean by that time. I got some heart shaped boards, I think I got a pan, and some odd colored sprinkles.

I hear there's another store called Kitchen Window that was opened by the same guy that used to do the fondant classes at Sweet Celebrations. I've been meaning to check it out, I think it's a ways away from me though. Not sure if they have a huge selection of cake decorating stuff though.

Rose_N_Crantz Posted 8 Jun 2010 , 9:07pm
post #26 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by Herekittykitty

Ok, so the rest of the practice cakes get various BC's, trying indydebi's and Sugarshack's if I can get hi-ratio and find dream whip.




I've gotten Dream Whip at Target and Cub. Though I think Target might have the better price per packet, but I can't remember.

Toptier Posted 8 Jun 2010 , 9:23pm
post #27 of 52

I remember some helpful tips I learned here - If you like to roll your fondant thick (1/4"), then use only a crumbcoat of bc, if you like to roll your fondant thin (1/8" to 3/16") then use a thicker coat of bc. OR use ganache which is actually the best medium IMHO for smooth fondant, especially on difficult shapes, ie. Topsy turvy or carved.

And yes to the elevating on a small can trick, I can add that I let the cake sit on the can for several hours before trimming the bottom edge. This allows the fondant to settle as far down as it's going to go and you can get a nice clean edge when you cut it.

White chocolate in fondant (thank you Jennifer Dontz!) really helps with dryness, pliability, and adds strength and workability. You can use it thinner than standard fondant without it breaking, I highly recommend it.

misha35 Posted 8 Jun 2010 , 9:27pm
post #28 of 52

Mine looks very similar, I have not mastered getting the ruffles out of my f0ndant either.

Herekittykitty Posted 8 Jun 2010 , 10:12pm
post #29 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rose_N_Crantz

Quote:
Originally Posted by Herekittykitty


Are they open to the public? When Sweet Celebrations went out of business I almost cried. icon_cry.gif



Right? I remember when I learned it was closing. I went over to pick up some stuff, can't even remember what it was I was looking for, when I walk up and see a huge closing sign. The shelves were practically picked clean by that time. I got some heart shaped boards, I think I got a pan, and some odd colored sprinkles.

I hear there's another store called Kitchen Window that was opened by the same guy that used to do the fondant classes at Sweet Celebrations. I've been meaning to check it out, I think it's a ways away from me though. Not sure if they have a huge selection of cake decorating stuff though.




Kitchen Window is more like high end kitchen supplies, I know they do fancy cooking classes there (one of my co-workers takes them). I don't know about the baking selection though. I used to go to the SC store in Burnsville (Edina went trade only) and about 6mo before they closed the shelves were getting sparse - 1/2 the time I'd leave w/o getting what I came for. Guess a pilgrimage to Fridley is in my future. icon_smile.gif

Thanks for the tip, I'll stop at Target tonight to see if they have Dream whip.

Herekittykitty Posted 8 Jun 2010 , 10:27pm
post #30 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by Herekittykitty

And after painting it to look, in some crazed, alternate reality, like a checked table cloth; this is the "good side". icon_lol.gif

So apparently I am really bad at painting too. Sigh - I really do have massive delusions of grandure. Any suggestions on this technique as well?




*Banging head on desk* Square sponge. Square sponge the size I want the red parts to be - perfectly uniform squares, not triangles, not blobs, not two white or red spots next to each other, squares.

What is it they say about hindsight?

Quote by @%username% on %date%

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