How Much Buttercream Under Fondant?

Decorating By carmijok Updated 28 Oct 2010 , 12:03pm by shearpamela

carmijok Posted 7 Jun 2010 , 5:49pm
post #1 of 16

With all the really tasty sounding recipes for fondant I've seen lately, I'm considering trying my hand at covering a cake with it. Problem is, people really like my butter cream and some people don't like the texture of fondant so I want to put a decent layer of buttercream on before the fondant. I've heard several schools of thought on this. The bakery I worked for would hardly put any butter cream on the cake before covering with fondant (when they did fondant cakes--most of the time they just did smoothed butter cream). I asked why because I saw a Martha Stewart show where she cut into a Ron Ben Israel cake and I swear there looked to be an inch of butter cream under the fondant..and I was told that the fondant would shift if there were too much of a butter cream layer underneath. So...I'm asking if there is a consensus of thought on this...or does it just depend on the baker...and the type of butter cream?

15 replies
catlharper Posted 7 Jun 2010 , 7:03pm
post #2 of 16

I'm a "in the middle" girl. I don't put a thin or a thick coat on. Too thin and you can see every bump and bulge, too thick and the fondant just stretches and falls when the buttercream softens up. So thick enough to be smooth, not too thick so that it slides when it melts...hard to tell you what that measurement is.

Cat

leily Posted 7 Jun 2010 , 7:11pm
post #3 of 16

from all the respones i see on the boards it is a personal preference by the baker/decorator.

I personally put the same amount of buttercream on the cake with fondant as i do without. I have NEVER had a problem with it sliding b/c of the buttercream. That just seems like a silly thought to me, but hey maybe someone else has had the experience and can give you something different.

oh, and i use a crusting buttercream - similiar to the wilton buttercream recipe, but modified a touch.

mayo2222 Posted 7 Jun 2010 , 7:21pm
post #4 of 16

I normally cover it with less frosting when using fondant because my BC does tend to shift on me. I just use more frosting in the filling in order to still have the same cake to frosting ratio if you will.

QueenOfSweets Posted 7 Jun 2010 , 7:29pm
post #5 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by leily

I personally put the same amount of buttercream on the cake with fondant as i do without.




Me too. I use crusting buttercream (Sugarshack's) and Satin Ice fondant rolled thin (1/8"). I've never had an issue with shifting or sliding.

BeanCountingBaker Posted 7 Jun 2010 , 8:04pm
post #6 of 16

I've had trouble with my buttercream squishing out at the bottom in the past, I've switched to a mostly crisco recipe and had more practice with fondant and now I have no trouble. The last fondant cake I made had less icing because it was a 3 part wedding cake and I made 5 batches of icing and didn't want to make anymore. Less buttercream worked well for me too.

artscallion Posted 7 Jun 2010 , 8:18pm
post #7 of 16

I use the same amount of buttercream under fondant as I do without it and it never sags or slides. I use non-crusting.

mamawrobin Posted 8 Jun 2010 , 4:56am
post #8 of 16

I use the same amount of icing either way. I don't use a really thick coat of icing on my cakes anyway. I suppose it would depend on how much a normal coat of icing is for someone to determine whether it's too much or not.

ceshell Posted 8 Jun 2010 , 5:36am
post #9 of 16

Check out some pics I posted of how much buttercream I put under my fondant - they're on this thread http://cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-673052.html

I've done three types of icing this way: IMBC, Whipped Cream Buttercream, and Toba Garrett's chocolate.

HamSquad Posted 8 Jun 2010 , 6:21am
post #10 of 16

Wow Ceshell this info is great. I did a last minute cake on Saturday, had no time to let it chill as I usually do, it is a shirt cake. The chocolate bc was squishing out a little on one corner and I used crusting bc. It held up, but chilling the cake before putting on the fondant and chilling again after does makes a big difference did it before with a previous cake. I've learn something new again.
Thanks,
Hammy

sweettreat101 Posted 8 Jun 2010 , 8:42am
post #11 of 16

I personally use the Wilton icing tip to frost my cakes. I use the same amount of butter cream on my cakes under my fondant. My fondant cakes in my picture all have the usual amount of butter cream and I have no problems with butter cream oozing out or bulges. People I know don't like the thickness of fondant or the texture so they peel it off and eat the butter cream. They do like the look of fondant though.

carmijok Posted 8 Jun 2010 , 4:33pm
post #12 of 16

Thanks all! Next cake I do I'm going to try the fondant over the buttercream keeping my usual ratio of buttercream. I"m excited! guess I should practice on smoothing the stuff since I've never done it, huh? Any tips on that would be appreciated too! icon_biggrin.gif

artscallion Posted 8 Jun 2010 , 6:51pm
post #13 of 16

If you're talking about smoothing the fondant, get two Wilton fondant smoothers. That way you can work it without ever having to touch it with your fingers, which can leave marks or dents.

If you're talking about smoothing the buttercream, get a bench scraper, heat it under hot running water, dry it off, then you can stand it flat on its side on your turntable with the long side against the side of the cake, then spin. Smooth the top with a similarly heated large offset spatula, pulling the icing in from the edge as you go around.

carmijok Posted 8 Jun 2010 , 6:58pm
post #14 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by artscallion

If you're talking about smoothing the fondant, get two Wilton fondant smoothers. That way you can work it without ever having to touch it with your fingers, which can leave marks or dents.

If you're talking about smoothing the buttercream, get a bench scraper, heat it under hot running water, dry it off, then you can stand it flat on its side on your turntable with the long side against the side of the cake, then spin. Smooth the top with a similarly heated large offset spatula, pulling the icing in from the edge as you go around.




I was definitely talking about the fondant. I have one fondant smoother that I bought 'just in case'. I see everyone on TV doing it with their hands and then the smoother... It just seems to magically smooth. Hopefully that will be the case when I do it! icon_lol.gif

tbmichals Posted 28 Oct 2010 , 2:09am
post #15 of 16

Last week I frosted my cakes and put them in the fridge (about 5am). Got them out around 10 to decorate and attempted to put a fondant "grass skirt" on the side. It kept sliding off (tried the fondant thick and thin). Ended up leaving it off. So my question is, you are saying to frost it, put in fridge, then cover with fondant then put in fridge again. Will I not have the same problem again? And will my fondant colors run in the fridge?

shearpamela Posted 28 Oct 2010 , 12:03pm
post #16 of 16

I wanted to try a post a photo of my cake but I can never get images to post right, only URL's. Attachments don't work for me either, or my avatar for that matter! icon_rolleyes.gif
I don't have great luck if my fondant is too thin. I used Toba's fondant recipe mixed with candy clay. The Buttercream is Cake Bible Moussiline on the outside and Neo Classic between the layers, it was very soft so I used it as filling with Icing Fruits.
I chill before fondant to firm up the icing or ganache and place back in the fridge after fondant. I take it out an hour or so before it is needed so the condensation can evaporate.
But I will post the URL and try the image itself below:
[url]http://cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=gallery&file=displayimage&pid=1845720⊂=1845725

[/url][img]Image[/img]

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%