Using Shelf-Liner With Fondant?

Decorating By Angelfire3 Updated 8 Jun 2010 , 9:48am by awatterson

Angelfire3 Posted 5 Jun 2010 , 2:43pm
post #1 of 20

Greetings All,

I ran across this video


on youtube and I wanted to know your thoughts.

She uses shelf-liner to do impressions on her fondant covered cakes. I initially thought it was a great idea until I remember buying some shelf-liner to put on my cabinet shelves & inside my draws and realized that the ones I bought wasn't sealed/wrapped in plastic. It was closed by a bar-coded tape and placed in an open bin. You can't wash it b/c it seems as if it'll disintegrate in the washer/dryer.

Oh, she also uses rubber stamps, which is fine b/c you can wash them with antibacterial dish detergent. So, the rubber stamps are just fine.

What are your thoughts?

19 replies
Angelfire3 Posted 5 Jun 2010 , 4:51pm
post #2 of 20

I have roughly 40 views but no comments. Hmmmm. If you view it, you should at least answer my question icon_biggrin.gif

bridge72 Posted 5 Jun 2010 , 5:13pm
post #3 of 20

I've read on here many times that you should only use products as in stamps, etc. that are labeled food safe only. I used a regular stamp before but I covered mine with plastic wrap before using it. I didn't want to take any chances on any part of the stamp touching the fondant. It worked fine you could still see the detail. hth

BORIKS03 Posted 5 Jun 2010 , 5:16pm
post #4 of 20

Sorry but I have no idea. lol . Just thought I would reply even if it doesn't help much.

Angelfire3 Posted 5 Jun 2010 , 5:24pm
post #5 of 20

@BORIKS03 LOL!

Thanks for the replies. I'm NOT planning on doing it. I was just interested in what everyone thought about this woman's choice to use it for her cakes.

@bridge72 I've never used a rubber stamp before, but thanks for the tip on covering it in plastic wrap before using it.

I'm not a professional baker. I just bake for my family & hubby's potlucks.

Kims_cakes Posted 5 Jun 2010 , 5:25pm
post #6 of 20

I thought there was a thread a while back that said it is not food safe. I can't find a link, slow computer icon_cry.gif , sorry.

Angelfire3 Posted 5 Jun 2010 , 5:27pm
post #7 of 20

@Kims_cakes,
I've never searched this forum for that. I just seen the youtube video and instantly posted my question to CC members to find out their thoughts on using shelf-liner to make impressions on their cakes. That's all.

I think people are thinking that I want to use it. I DO NOT!

But since we're talking about food safety. How many people on here use clay guns or clay accessories, like clay leaf cutters, embossers etc? Are they food safe? I seen them at Micheal's the other day in the clay aisle.

chellescountrycakes Posted 5 Jun 2010 , 5:31pm
post #8 of 20

I do tend to wipe or wash everything with HOT HOT water, and then put/ wipe alchohol on it. (drinkin, not medical) before I use it- I use differnt things, but fiqure that even my own 'food safe' stuff is put in cabinets, or put on the counter get hair, dust, dead skin cells, icky's from the air etc. No matter how dillegent we are Nothing is sterlized once it goes in the cabinet. thats why hospitals open things from plastic wrap before they cut into you. Even things I buy that ARE wrapped in plastic I clean with hot water. I have put shelf liner in my dishwasher before. (my kids laid peanut butter covered spoon on it)- I also wash my silacone hot pads in the dishwasher, when I clean up the kitchen at night after supper-- and they make a cute pattern, cause theyhave indented dots.

awatterson Posted 5 Jun 2010 , 5:34pm
post #9 of 20

That is interesting. I have never seen any liner that looked like that. I have only seen the one that has squares.

Angelfire3 Posted 5 Jun 2010 , 5:39pm
post #10 of 20

@chellebyerly,
Thank you for your reply. So you mean to tell me shelf-lines are dishwasher safe? OMG, I've been wasting my money buying new ones when the old ones gets dirty.

You are so right about

Quote:
Quote:

'food safe' stuff is put in cabinets, or put on the counter get hair, dust, dead skin cells, icky's from the air etc. No matter how diligent we are Nothing is sterilized once it goes in the cabinet.




So much for food safety icon_biggrin.gif

chellescountrycakes Posted 5 Jun 2010 , 5:51pm
post #11 of 20

LOL - The ones I have are. I dont know if there is a differnce. and Hubbys ones that go in his tool box are. because once they get greasy/dirty I've washed them.

Now, mine are older, so they might have changed the makeup of them, I dont know. ??? icon_smile.gif

bridge72 Posted 5 Jun 2010 , 6:27pm
post #12 of 20

Your welcome! I'm just a hobby baker also so all help I get from here helps me tremendously icon_smile.gif

KayMc Posted 5 Jun 2010 , 6:38pm
post #13 of 20

I think the shelf liner could probably be washed and be safe. I use wooden spoons - and people have done so for thousands of years. I wash them in hot, soapy water, but I doubt it's any 'cleaner' than a washed shelf liner would be. I wonder if the liner would work covered w/ plastic wrap. Just a thought.

chellescountrycakes Posted 5 Jun 2010 , 7:05pm
post #14 of 20

KayMc thats what I was thinking. I LOVE my wooden spoons- and my black iron skillets. which I simply wipe out and hang up.

If I HAVE to wash them, I do so quickly and sparingly, and then dry them in the oven quick.

cs_confections Posted 5 Jun 2010 , 7:25pm
post #15 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by chellebyerly

I do tend to wipe or wash everything with HOT HOT water, and then put/ wipe alchohol on it. (drinkin, not medical) before I use it- I use differnt things, but fiqure that even my own 'food safe' stuff is put in cabinets, or put on the counter get hair, dust, dead skin cells, icky's from the air etc. No matter how dillegent we are Nothing is sterlized once it goes in the cabinet. thats why hospitals open things from plastic wrap before they cut into you. Even things I buy that ARE wrapped in plastic I clean with hot water. I have put shelf liner in my dishwasher before. (my kids laid peanut butter covered spoon on it)- I also wash my silacone hot pads in the dishwasher, when I clean up the kitchen at night after supper-- and they make a cute pattern, cause theyhave indented dots.




Oh good, I'm not really crazy or Kitchen OCD! My husband makes fun of me because I pre-wash all of the cake pans and tools needed for a new project. I also wash my KA bowl before using it. He just doesn't get why I would wash something I had cleaned before I put it away. I've always worried about dust and other things floating in the air and they're not things I use daily, so I wash them when I need them!

On the shelf liner - I really don't know. The ones I'm thinking of are the non-skid ones I use to keep the cake box from moving in my car and they stink when I open up a new package - a weird plastic chemical odor - yuck!

ceshell Posted 7 Jun 2010 , 7:32am
post #16 of 20

FWIW the reason some of these things aren't considered food safe is due to their chemical makeup, not due to anything which could be washed away with soap or antibacterial agents. I'm talking pthalates, whatever....chemicals in the actual makeup of the product, which can leach out into food. There is an old thread somewhere on here where someone emailed the manufacturers of Contact paper to ask if it was safe to use on cake boards, and Contact stated that their product was not meant for use with food. Why can you put your dishes/silverware/etc on it? Well, chemicals won't leach into silverware! But they could leach into FOOD.

That said, I use Contact paper on my cake presentation boards frequently...although I keep my cake on its own board so it doesn't actually touch the display board. I'm not so sure I would feel comfortable pressing that stuff into my icing though...

There's been much debate about the use of non-food-safe rubber stamps, for the same reason. I think that's a "go with your comfort zone" question...whether or not you think the product (and its chemical makeup) is in contact with the food long enough for chemicals to be transferred. I rather doubt any studies have been done on the topic icon_biggrin.gif.

I have one set of Sculpey clay molds which I have used for fondant sea creatures...although Sculpey states that their molds are not food safe icon_redface.gif. I hadn't thought about the Makin's clay extruder...I mean, it's simply made of aluminum although it might be worthy to ask them if there is lead in the paint. That would be bad...real bad. I would tend to imagine that the paint is NOT lead based though, because it is used for clay figures and both the tool and figures would, presumably, be handled a lot...possibly by children...so lead paint in an item NOT intended for food is still not a good call. Hmm...who wants to email Makins?? icon_biggrin.gif

awatterson Posted 7 Jun 2010 , 9:31am
post #17 of 20

I just sent Makins and email. I will post the update when they email me back.

awatterson Posted 8 Jun 2010 , 12:00am
post #18 of 20

This is the response that I got from Makins.


Greetings Angelique;



Thank you for your purchase and use of the Makins® Ultimate Clay Extruder®. I also want to thank you for your question regarding the application of the Ultimate Clay Extruder®. I am aware this extruder has found a comfortable and useful place in the cake decorating industry.



The clay extruder barrel, handle, end caps and push rod are made using anodized aluminum and the plunger is made from brass, all of which contains lead. Lead is used in almost all commercial grade equipment including larger mixing bowls, utensils and appliances. For example, all stainless steel utensils, countertops and appliances contain lead. Additionally, the metal tips which have been used with fondant bags for decades, are made from tin or stainless steel, and contain lead. The FDA does not regulate use of kitchen aids and appliances when working with food, but rather regulates manufacturers and suppliers of food products and their processes to ensure handling, preparation and storage practices used in the facility complies with FDA Good Manufacturing Practices.



http://www.fda.gov/Drugs/DevelopmentApprovalProcess/Manufacturing/ucm169105.htm



The key question is not does kitchen utensils or appliances contain lead, but rather is, when the utensil or appliance is used as intended, does the user or consumer become contaminated with a hazardous substance? Assuming the user is practicing Good Manufacturing Practices when using the extruder with fondant, then NO, there is no risk of contamination.



For example, in an ideal world, if the cake decorator; (1) loads the extruder with fondant, (2) applies the fondant to a cake in a timely manner, (3) thoroughly cleans the extruder after each use, (4) then stores the extruder in a clean and safe place, then the extruder should be considered completely safe.



As with any other metal kitchen utensil, the extruder is not intended to be used as a storage compartment for used fondant or used in any type of oven.



I hope the information provided is useful to you. Should you have any additional questions, please dont hesitate to call on me.







Best Regards,





Tom...





Makin's USA

12305 Cary Circle, Ste #4

Omaha, Nebraska 68128



OFC: (402) 891-0085

FAX: (402) 891-0089

Email: [email protected]



MUSA LOGO_TV.jpg

ceshell Posted 8 Jun 2010 , 5:20am
post #19 of 20

Thanks for emailing them, and for posting that response! You totally rock!!

I now have a) peace of mind regarding using my extruder, and b) a total freakout about their statement about lead content in so many food-related products. LOLOL. Not really, actually. After reading their explanation, I realized there are plenty of food-related products which we've always known contain lead: crystal, anyone? It just never occurred to me that it's in other products. I guess lead doesn't just leach out on its own...think about when it's a hazard in homes from paint; it's not from touching the paint, it's from when the paint CHIPS OFF.

Anyway, totally appreciate you looking into that. Sorry for the hijack icon_smile.gif

awatterson Posted 8 Jun 2010 , 9:48am
post #20 of 20

I had the same question going through my mind the past month about that thing too. I kept worrying that I might make someone sick. I am glad that I got it clarified. I thought that I may have been the only one with that question, so I am glad that you "pushed" me to asking. Thanks.

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%