Full Sheet Cake?

Decorating By maude Updated 4 Jun 2010 , 1:32pm by dchockeyguy

maude Posted 3 Jun 2010 , 7:47pm
post #1 of 13

I have a request for a full sheet cake. Will 2 11x15 cakes work? If not what do you guys use? Thanks

12 replies
dchockeyguy Posted 3 Jun 2010 , 8:07pm
post #2 of 13

To me, that's a full sheet.

prterrell Posted 3 Jun 2010 , 8:15pm
post #3 of 13

A full sheet is 18"x24"
A half sheet is 12"x18"
A quarter sheet is 9"x12"

The 11"x15" is an odd size, it's a little larger than a 1/3 of the size of the full sheet. I'm not sure how the 11"x15" size came about.

Anyway, most people don't know what the actual sizes of sheets are. People will order a "full" sheet and be expecting anything froma 9"x12" to an 18"x24"!

It's better to refer to the actual dimensions than to use the names.

Loucinda Posted 3 Jun 2010 , 9:35pm
post #4 of 13

I use 2 - 12x18's as a full sheet. I consider the 11x15 as 1/3 sheet.

sberryp Posted 3 Jun 2010 , 9:43pm
post #5 of 13

Wow and I thought 12x18 was a full sheet. I am such a newbie, thanks for the information.

TeriO Posted 3 Jun 2010 , 9:46pm
post #6 of 13

when you put the two together, how do you you keep them from seperating down the middle? Dumb question?

bennett5 Posted 3 Jun 2010 , 10:04pm
post #7 of 13

Use your speed icer and put a thick strip of icing on one side of one cake then put your other half next to it and push them gently together. You should see a little squish(is that even a word???) of icing come up from the "seem"...then your good to go ! Hope this helps...

ArtieTs Posted 3 Jun 2010 , 10:05pm
post #8 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by TeriO

when you put the two together, how do you you keep them from seperating down the middle? Dumb question?





Not a dumb ? at all. When I started making full cakes which I have since stopped doing (too much hassle), I had a problem with the middle seperating. What I began doing was making sure I used a really strong bottom board to prevent bending & when I ice the cakes I make sure to apply a nice thick amount of buttercream especially down the center. The strong board really makes a difference though. HTH.

TeriO Posted 3 Jun 2010 , 10:32pm
post #9 of 13

Thanks, I have never tried this, I was alway too afraid it would come apart. Maybe I will get brave one day..

3GCakes Posted 3 Jun 2010 , 10:42pm
post #10 of 13

Be sure to ask the person how many people they need to feed....then check a serving chart for the needed size.

As someone said....the term "sheet cake" is VERY subjective. Especially if you are doing a one layer cake or two layer.

The number of servings needed is everything!

maude Posted 4 Jun 2010 , 10:15am
post #11 of 13

Thanks for the clarifications. I can't seem to find a serving chart that gives me the servings for rectangular cakes though.

indydebi Posted 4 Jun 2010 , 12:25pm
post #12 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by dchockeyguy

To me, that's a full sheet.



There is no "to me" to it. We can't just CALL something a half or a full sheet. icon_biggrin.gif Here's a thread that has the "logic" of why cakes are called the sizes they are called: http://cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-628706-.html thumbs_up.gif

Quote:
Originally Posted by maude

Thanks for the clarifications. I can't seem to find a serving chart that gives me the servings for rectangular cakes though.


The good news about square and rectangle cakes is you don't need a chart ... you can just "Do the Math!" to figure your servings. Here's a thread where I explain how to do that: http://forum.cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-653932-math.html

dchockeyguy Posted 4 Jun 2010 , 1:32pm
post #13 of 13

Just one more reason I need a bigger oven then. I can't get anything bigger than my 11x15 pan in my current oven.

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