Birds And Butterflies

Decorating By ohayr639 Updated 14 Jun 2010 , 3:34pm by ohayr639

ohayr639 Posted 1 Jun 2010 , 1:29am
post #1 of 21

Sounds easy enough but I am drawing some blanks because it will be chocolate butter cream icing and the whole cake will be brown. I do not have the money to cover it in fondant, nor did the customer ask for it or was willing to pay for it (understandably so). The little girl likes all things nature and I don't know where to go with a brown cake!

it will be a 10in and 8in (and possibly a 6 in too) and I am just dry Any help would be appreciated!

20 replies
Rose_N_Crantz Posted 1 Jun 2010 , 1:44am
post #2 of 21

Pastels always look nice against brown. Kinda makes the decorations stand out more if they are against a dark background. Maybe you could do a cascading effect with just cutouts of birds and butterflies in varying pastel colors. Maybe with a bright one or two mixed in to kinda make it interesting.

ohayr639 Posted 1 Jun 2010 , 2:25am
post #3 of 21

I didn't think of anything like that, good point. I am wondering though if the cascading effect will be too "sophisticated" for a 1 year old.

The pastels got me wondering though if I did some pastel "grass blades" and then birds and butterflies. . .

lizabu Posted 1 Jun 2010 , 2:40pm
post #4 of 21

I've made chocolate butterflies before. I'm not sure if that's what you're looking for. They are kind of fussy but it's a simple idea. I found this image online and I printed it out. Then I melted some coating chocolate and I added a teeny bit of water at a time (literally just drops) until I got the consistency of a really thin peanut butter or a yogurt consistency. Adding water gives you more control and lets you pipe thinner lines without it spreading out. You pipe each wing individually and let dry. Then I took tin foil and folded it into a long strip and folded that in half to give me a V shape. I placed a right & left wing together and piped a little chocolate in the center to glue the two wings together and let dry. You can then glue the finished butterfly on to whatever you made with a little melted chocolate.
LL
LL

lizabu Posted 1 Jun 2010 , 2:45pm
post #5 of 21

This is the finished dessert
LL

ohayr639 Posted 1 Jun 2010 , 4:52pm
post #6 of 21

Those are BEAUTIFUL!!!! Thanks for the post, however I was looking more for design ideas that will incorporate birds and butterflies well when the whole cake will be chocolate frosting. . . Thank you again!

msulli10 Posted 1 Jun 2010 , 5:09pm
post #7 of 21

I just did a butterfly cake (see my pics)- sorry, no birds. I used gumpaste and the PME butterfly cutter set which was fairly inexpensive. It was super easy to make these and I just brushed on some luster dust so they would shimmer.

tiggy2 Posted 1 Jun 2010 , 5:10pm
post #8 of 21

You put water in chocolate coating and it didn't seize up on you?

FullHouse Posted 1 Jun 2010 , 5:16pm
post #9 of 21

The Whimiscal Bakehouse cookbook has patterns and instructions for chocolate transfer butterflies, the Wilton Course 2 book has a colorflow bird pattern (could be used for choco. transfer method as well). I have them, my scanner's been tempermental lately, but PM me if you'd like me to try scanning for you.

lilyankee5688 Posted 1 Jun 2010 , 5:17pm
post #10 of 21

you could do that butterfly idea, with white chocolate, and if you want colors you can dye them colors, like pastels. then have them randomly around the cake, or have them cascading down..

Smallfrye Posted 1 Jun 2010 , 5:19pm
post #11 of 21

can you make it look like a tree stump with flowers, birds and butterflies all over it? I have seen tons of great ones on here. That would help with it all being brown. HTH

DetailsByDawn Posted 1 Jun 2010 , 5:41pm
post #12 of 21

I love the tree stump idea too! Here's one that might inspire you! It was posted by mygirlsmne.

http://cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=gallery&file=displayimage&pid=1417222

Smallfrye Posted 1 Jun 2010 , 6:09pm
post #13 of 21
ohayr639 Posted 1 Jun 2010 , 7:55pm
post #14 of 21

Thanks so much!!!!

Both of those cakes look awesome!

I think I might do the tree stump thing. Do you think I should carve the cakes so that they look more "flush"?

OH! and they are square. . . Now what?!?! icon_cry.gif

Smallfrye Posted 1 Jun 2010 , 8:11pm
post #15 of 21

just carve them a little, tree stumps dont have to be perfectly round.

lizabu Posted 2 Jun 2010 , 3:57am
post #16 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by tiggy2

You put water in chocolate coating and it didn't seize up on you?




Its a little trick taught to me by my Chef from Culinary school. He's a pastry Chef for 25 years. You have to be super careful. Melt the coating chocolate and dip your fingers in water and drop only a drop or two of water into the chocolate and stirring until it thickens to a nice ribbon stage. When you try to pipe with chocolate it spreads and you will never get a nice delicate lacy effect. When you add water it thickens the chocolate giving you more control and allowing you to pipe thinner more delicate lines.

tinygoose Posted 2 Jun 2010 , 4:21am
post #17 of 21

I did this one with butterflies and ladybugs. The butterflies were fondant and I dried them on the corner of a sheet pan. Attached a wire with royal icing...easy peasy. Pink looks really nice against chocolate, I think. You could make the birds the same way if you can find a cutter.

I put the little hole in the butterflies with straws and #5, 10, 3 icing tips. Floral wire stamen for the antennas.

http://cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=gallery&file=displayimage&pid=1565615

DetailsByDawn Posted 2 Jun 2010 , 4:24am
post #18 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by lizabu

Quote:
Originally Posted by tiggy2

You put water in chocolate coating and it didn't seize up on you?



Its a little trick taught to me by my Chef from Culinary school. He's a pastry Chef for 25 years. You have to be super careful. Melt the coating chocolate and dip your fingers in water and drop only a drop or two of water into the chocolate and stirring until it thickens to a nice ribbon stage. When you try to pipe with chocolate it spreads and you will never get a nice delicate lacy effect. When you add water it thickens the chocolate giving you more control and allowing you to pipe thinner more delicate lines.




Can't wait to try that! What a wonderful trick! I pipe in chocolate ALL the time and it's never quite as thin as I would like. Thanks for sharing!

icer101 Posted 2 Jun 2010 , 4:32am
post #19 of 21

I have recipes for chocolate clay, that you use ice cold water in the recipe. It is , 1 lb. of summer coating(melt it). Stir it lightly with 1/2 cup of liquid glucose. Add 2 tsp. ice cold water to the mixture and stir until blended. Place a paper towel over the bowl and let it stand over night. Knead the clay and then cover and rest again over night before using.

ohayr639 Posted 2 Jun 2010 , 1:57pm
post #20 of 21

Tinygoose,

That is a beautiful cake!!!! Thanks for the ideas, I am leaning towards doing the cake that way.

On a side note, how do you make the sugar tiles? Thanks!

ohayr639 Posted 14 Jun 2010 , 3:34pm
post #21 of 21

Here is the final product. Thank you so much for all of your help. It is too big to post so here is the link. Thanks again!

http://cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=gallery&file=displayimage&pid=1708313

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