Gluten Free Grooms Cake

Baking By Nikkicakes Updated 2 Jun 2010 , 11:01pm by nelikate

Nikkicakes Posted 31 May 2010 , 3:12pm
post #1 of 20

I have had a request for a chocolate gluten-free grooms cake. The bride actually told me that she knows the cake will be dry and "not-so-good" because she has never had a gluten free cake that was, and that as long as it looked good she did not care. Well, I have no desire to deliver a "not-so-good" tasting cake!! Does anyone have a really good recipe for gluten free cake??? Thanks!

19 replies
bettinashoe Posted 31 May 2010 , 3:36pm
post #2 of 20

America's Test Kitchen has an absolutely wonderful chocolate gluten free cake, triple chocolate cake. If you can't find the recipe let me know and I'll forward it to you.

Sorry! It's called triple-chocolate mousse cake. It's "to die for."

Montrealconfections Posted 31 May 2010 , 3:41pm
post #3 of 20

I personally do not do gluten free cakes since I use flour in my kitchen and therefore it is IMPOSSIBLE to guarantee a cake without trace amounts. Depending on the type of allergy or intolerance the person has a small trace amount could make them ill. With increased awareness of celiac disease perhaps you have a gluten free bakery in your area? If you still want to do it I suggest using a gluten free cake mix (available at most large health food stores) since you will need to buy all sorts of ingredients you might never use again. The chocolate one I did was not too bad the vanilla was HORRIBLE!!

Good luck!

PS here is a link to info on the condition (Celiac):

http://digestive.niddk.nih.gov/ddiseases/pubs/celiac/#what

artscallion Posted 31 May 2010 , 3:44pm
post #4 of 20

Just made a cake using a gluten free brownie recipe from King Arthur Flour site. It calls for King Arthur gluten free flour, but I used Bob's Red Mill Gluten free flour because it's what my store carries. I also left out the chips and nuts so it would be more cake-like.

It worked perfectly for a cake. It was dense, moist and, based on the test one I made, I guarantee you would not be able to tell it from the best regular brownie.

http://www.kingarthurflour.com/recipes/gluten-free-brownies-recipe

mamacakes15 Posted 31 May 2010 , 4:20pm
post #5 of 20

Try the cake recipes at Elana's Pantry. She has wonderful recipes. She uses almond flour -- not Bob's Red Mill, but a finer kind that you have to order. I think you'd have to charge more because the flour costs so much. But her recipes are really good.

nelikate Posted 1 Jun 2010 , 4:07am
post #6 of 20

Nikkicakes

Im in Australia and use BASCO gluten free cake mix which is yummy and great for decorating. - my non gluten free friends dont know the difference and actually request it sometimes!

Please ask the bride if the people who require a gluten free cake for dietary needs are okay with trace amounts. Otherwise you will be scrubbing down & bleaching your kitchen and tools & oven before making this cake to ensure trace amounts are not found.

Check also your fillings, buttercream & fondant are all gluten free. I can take off non gluten free fondant and be fine but my friend will be sick for weeks if she did.

Also do not have any open non gluten free products in your kitchen while baking & decorating this cake.

Good luck!
Nel

JanH Posted 1 Jun 2010 , 6:48am
post #7 of 20

..moving to Recipe Requests.

Bunsen Posted 1 Jun 2010 , 7:12am
post #8 of 20

This orange almond cake is gluten free and tastes amazing - it's very dense and moist and goes really well with dark chocolate ganache.

http://desertcandy.blogspot.com/2007/03/orange-almond-cake.html

JanH Posted 1 Jun 2010 , 7:25am
post #9 of 20

Unless you're baking in a gluten free environment, cross contamination is a serious consideration:

http://cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-674736-.html

HTH

mkolmar Posted 2 Jun 2010 , 12:40am
post #10 of 20

If his condition is serious don't do it. A single speck of flour can mess his whole body system up for a while. If it's not that strict (which would make me wonder why they need a GF cake in the first place) then you need to find a good GF flour. Order one online though. The Bob Red Mills brand is really gross and I don't recommend it.

There is a GF flour I use at work that comes in a gold foil packaging that works well. It's a blend of different GF flours.

If you bake gluten free you will probably need to add a little Xanthum Gum.
Go and get a few books about GF baking from your Library. It can get tricky and it helps to have a few references.

tlreetz Posted 2 Jun 2010 , 1:04am
post #11 of 20

My family members have Celiac Disease and we bake GF cakes for them and in our business as well. Cross- contamination is a HUGE concern!! You CAN NOT use the same pans or tools to bake regular cakes and GF cakes. Everything must be specifically used for GF baking....pans, tools, cooling racks....everything!!

My brother in law is so sensitive that if he picks up a cracker to give to his daughter and then eats a piece of food with the same hand he touched the cracker with, he ends up in the hospital. Now granted, not everyone is that sensitive, but don't chance cross-contamination! Even the flour particles floating in the air will contaminate.

bakescupcakes Posted 2 Jun 2010 , 1:41am
post #12 of 20

I use a recipe from the 'Crabapple Bakery Cupcake Book'. It is a cupcake recipe using almond meal instead of flour, and it is wonderful! It tastes just like a brownie, very decadent for a wedding.

I have made it into a cake, with lots of ganache in layers, it doesnt rise very high, but I did get enough height with the ganache and fondant. see my photos "Liana's birthday cake". She loved it, and ate nearly the whole thing herself!!

Recipe makes fabulous cupcakes, made 110 for wedding last year, were served as a dessert, I ganached and covered in fondant. Bride's mother said she received many compliments, were enjoyed by all.

Lol there was only one guest who was gluten free, but I'm so glad I came across the recipe, because I've used it many times since, it has 1 week shelf life after baking so plenty of time to decorate.

nelikate Posted 2 Jun 2010 , 1:48am
post #13 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by tlreetz

My family members have Celiac Disease and we bake GF cakes for them and in our business as well.




Hi tlreetz

I dont mean to highjack the post but does your business bake both non GF & GF cakes? I am looking at opening a business and cannot decide whether to offer non GF cakes. - I am GF and would have to reteach myself how to cook with gluten! but mostly I am concerned about cross contamination. - i understand seperate tools & equipment for GF/Non GF but what about work space. do you bake GF on one day and non GF on another?

I think for those who do a one off GF cake thinking about these questions is important too.

thanks
Nel

foxymomma521 Posted 2 Jun 2010 , 1:59am
post #14 of 20
Occther Posted 2 Jun 2010 , 2:14am
post #15 of 20

My sister avoids gluten (not that intolerant but it flairs up her arthritis) and we make a wonderful carrot cake that everyone loves. If interested, I can look up the recipe.

JanH Posted 2 Jun 2010 , 3:49am
post #16 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by nelikate

i understand seperate tools & equipment for GF/Non GF but what about work space. do you bake GF on one day and non GF on another?




Quote:
Originally Posted by Mensch

I saw that you mentioned gluten-free products.

Check and see what requirements you might need to make gluten-free products, and label them as gluten-free. If you use flour in the bakery it is always present, and anything 'gluten-free' will have traces of flour/gluten it it.

Where I live, the only way I can legally label a product as gluten-free is if I have a complete separate room for gluten-free baking, including an oven and space for packaging, and an airlock for entering and changing clothes/shoes etc. Unpackaged gluten-free stuff being taken through the bakery where I use flour would then no longer be able to be labelled as gluten-free. We don't have that much space so this was never an option.

We do make products without flour and label them as such, but can't label them as gluten-free.




http://cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-653262-.html

HTH

nelikate Posted 2 Jun 2010 , 4:07am
post #17 of 20

thanks Jan!

Nel

ceshell Posted 2 Jun 2010 , 7:48am
post #18 of 20

If you're not having concerns about cross contamination and can stand another recipe suggestion, try the Hershey's Perfectly Chocolate Cake - GF version found in this thread http://forum.cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=Forums&file=viewtopic&t=522883

Later on in the thread I review that cake (as well as two others). I baked it for a friend with mild celiac (trace amounts are not a problem for her) and NOBODY at the party had a clue that the cake was GF.

tlreetz Posted 2 Jun 2010 , 12:50pm
post #19 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by nelikate

Quote:
Originally Posted by tlreetz

My family members have Celiac Disease and we bake GF cakes for them and in our business as well.



Hi tlreetz

I dont mean to highjack the post but does your business bake both non GF & GF cakes? I am looking at opening a business and cannot decide whether to offer non GF cakes. - I am GF and would have to reteach myself how to cook with gluten! but mostly I am concerned about cross contamination. - i understand seperate tools & equipment for GF/Non GF but what about work space. do you bake GF on one day and non GF on another?

I think for those who do a one off GF cake thinking about these questions is important too.

thanks
Nel





I actually have 2 seperate kitchens which is very helpful in this situation! I am concerned if you have Celiac, baking non GF items...how sensitive are you?

nelikate Posted 2 Jun 2010 , 11:01pm
post #20 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by tlreetz

I actually have 2 seperate kitchens which is very helpful in this situation! I am concerned if you have Celiac, baking non GF items...how sensitive are you?




Oh! lucky you, I wish I had two kitchens. Im not Celiac i'm a gluten intolerant person so I can bake/ be around gluten. My partner can make toast and I can use the same toaster but I know if Im going to be selling cakes as gluten free this cannot happen. Im going to contact the celiac society here to see what they say about baking both types and geting licenced.

thanks for your help,
Narelle

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