Cutting Tall Tiers

Decorating By neecies_sweets Updated 31 May 2010 , 2:53am by neecies_sweets

neecies_sweets Posted 30 May 2010 , 8:12pm
post #1 of 8

I've only done 4" tiers for wedding cakes. . . the cake my bride has chosen looks like 6" tiers. How do I figure serving sizes? Should I do four layers per tier with a board between the middle two for disassembling and cutting? Or does the tier get sliced as a three (or four) layer, very tall slice? Thanks!

7 replies
jadedlogic Posted 30 May 2010 , 8:20pm
post #2 of 8

When I made my Easter cake and Cinderella cake in my photos I had a cake board halfway up the cake and iced it as one. Once you cut into it it will be normal sized slices of cake.
Hope that helps icon_smile.gif

neecies_sweets Posted 30 May 2010 , 10:24pm
post #3 of 8

thank you, jadedlogic! i thought that might be the best way, but i didn't want to miss something obvious icon_smile.gif btw, i love your Easter cake!

indydebi Posted 31 May 2010 , 12:55am
post #4 of 8

Some things to consider.

Unless you tort and fill the extra 2", then some poeple will get a 1x2x4 piece of cake with filling and some will get a 2x2x2 with no filling.

Be sure the person cutting it knows that the 2" cake above the board is cut into 2x2" squares and the 4" cake below the board is cut into 1x2x4" pieces.

Even if you do tort the 2" tall cake, I will PROMISE you that there will be famiy and guests who wonder ".....why did you get the BIG piece and I got this little square piece?" Even tho' it's the same amount of cake, I promise you that people will notice the difference.

If you decide to just serve a 1x2x6" piece, remember that you are allocating 50% more cake per slice (1x2x4=8cubic inches; 1x2x6 = 12 cubic inches), so your price per serving s/b 50% more. Example, if you charge $3/serving for a 4" tall cake, then you'd charge $4.50/serving for a 6" cake. Again, this is assuming you will cut the cake 1x2x6.

If cutting 1x2x6, factor in that dessert plates are usually 6" round, so the cake may lop off the end and not look very attractive.

neecies_sweets Posted 31 May 2010 , 1:59am
post #5 of 8

ooo-- okay no 6" tall pieces! but i thought (maybe?) to put the board between the second and third layers of a four-layer tier and then have them cut wider or deeper pieces. . . .but then the bottom half of each tier gets no pretty top of icing. i've seen tall tiers before-- how do these folks do it?!

neecies_sweets Posted 31 May 2010 , 2:04am
post #6 of 8

and thank you, indydebi, for your helpful reply-- i didn't even think about the size of the dessert plate icon_sad.gif

indydebi Posted 31 May 2010 , 2:04am
post #7 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by neecies_sweets

. . . .but then the bottom half of each tier gets no pretty top of icing. i've seen tall tiers before-- how do these folks do it?!


sure it does! Check out the tops of the cakes in my "How to Cut a wedding cake" pics .... http://cateritsimple.blogspot.com/search/label/cake%20comb ... notice the indentations that tell you the plates were sitting right on top of the icing and were actualy pressing down on the icing? But the icing remained in place.

Let your icing crust before assembly. I cut most of my wedding cakes. Even after I stopped using plates and started just using cardboards, the icing never (!) pulled off of the bottom tiers.

neecies_sweets Posted 31 May 2010 , 2:53am
post #8 of 8

just checked out your site and got a little sidetracked icon_smile.gif. . . great stuff!
my cake will be covered with fondant. so, maybe if i put some wax paper under the cardboard, the icing will be intact and will look nice-- but just will not have the fondant over the top (talking bottom half of the tier here). thanks again!

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