3 Tier Birthday Cake Help For Granddaughter

Decorating By LesaVaughn Updated 25 May 2010 , 2:43pm by mamawrobin

LesaVaughn Posted 25 May 2010 , 5:19am
post #1 of 13

Making a 3 tier square birthday cake for granddaughter. Using the 8, 14, & 16 inch square pans (I think that's the sizes), Wilton's sells them as a set.

Anyway, after looking over the amount of batter for each, I thought that was entirely too much cake. Will the cake still look okay if I only make each tier single layer tiers and not 2 layers per tier? Is cardboard ok underneath the top 2 layers? Also I assume dowel rods will be needed. Please help me with your advice. Thanks.

12 replies
mamawrobin Posted 25 May 2010 , 5:22am
post #2 of 13

I don't think it will look that good just single layers but that's just me. I make ALL of my tiers 4 inches. Each layer is 2 inches and I always use double layers. I like the look of a tall cake. If you only do single layers your cake is going to be 6 inches tall at best. If you don't need that much cake why not make smaller cakes. Most all of my cakes are 8 inch/6 inch for two tiered cakes and 10/8/6 for my three tier. It's not any more expensive to buy those size pans even though they're sold seperately.

Yes, cardboard cake circles is what you should use for the top two tiers. Supports (dowels/bubble tea straws) are needed for every 4 vertical inches of cake. If you're going to make a three tier cake I suggest doing two layer tiers for the look of the cake. Like I said doing only 1 layer for each "tier" is going to make a 6 inch tall cake. My tiers are almost that tall. Plus, I don't know how you're planning on decorating, but a 1 inch tier doesn't give you much room to decorate.

If you've never stacked a cake before I suggest that you watch some tutorials on youtube on "how to stack a cake". Good luck thumbs_up.gif

VeronicaLuis Posted 25 May 2010 , 6:15am
post #3 of 13

I use bubble tea straws for stacking, they are easier to cut than wooden dowels and are just as strong. You can buy them on ebay. I saw someone on here that wanted to look of a three tier cake but didn't want all of the cake and they used a dummy cake for the bottom tier and the top two tiers were cake. I watch Edna from designmeacake.com showing how she stacks her cakes. She has a video on youtube, really good. Good luck and have fun.

Bluehue Posted 25 May 2010 , 6:16am
post #4 of 13

If you do not need that much cake - have you considered using a *dummy* for one of the tiers.
That way you would still have your three tier cake.

Do you know how many people the cake is to feed or is it a certain 3 tier design that your GD is wanting?


Bluehue.

indydebi Posted 25 May 2010 , 6:59am
post #5 of 13

Like Bluehue, I was curious on how many people you need to feed? icon_confused.gif

Based on a standard 8 cubic inches, single layer cakes would be cut in 2x2x2" squares. An 8/14/16 would serve 16/49/64 = 129 servings.

2-layer cakes would be cut in 1x2x4" pieces. 8/14/16 would serve 32/98/128 = 258.

I just checked the wilton site .... they sell the set with 8/12/16. So with those pans, the servings would change to 16/36/64 = 116 for single layer and 32/72/128 = 232 double layer.

mamawrobin Posted 25 May 2010 , 8:54am
post #6 of 13

Like Bluehue and Indydebi I too should have ask how many servings you are going to need.

LesaVaughn Posted 25 May 2010 , 1:00pm
post #7 of 13

Thanks for everyone's tips. She is going to be 12 and found a 3 tier cake she wants. As for servings, We actually probably need no more than 50-75 and will likely cut large pieces. I did try to explain to her Mom that it would be a very big cake. When I looked at the picture it appeared as though the middle tier was double but other two were singles. I am also placing a jumbo cupcake on top tier. So does everyone think it will not look right with single layers? It is also traveling an hour away. Thanks. for all responses & advice.

LindaF144a Posted 25 May 2010 , 1:06pm
post #8 of 13

I have no idea of the level of your experience or if this will work for you. Maybe someone more experienced than myself will tell if this will work.

But - I saw a cake on here a few weeks ago. It was three tier birthday cake for a 1 year old. The bottom tier was a cake dummy frosted and decorated to look just like the top two tiers. It thought it was a clever way to get a pretty cake and not have a lot of servings. I saved that idea to use later. Maybe you can do the same.

mamawrobin Posted 25 May 2010 , 1:25pm
post #9 of 13

I have used dummies when I wanted a larger cake than I actually needed.
Have you ever stacked a cake before? I'm only asking because you ask if "dowel rods" would be needed and ask if "cardboard" would be ok under the first and second tiers.

Can you attach a photo of the cake you're planning on making? A 6/8/10 inch (doulbe layer tiers) cake will give you 74 servings. 12/10/8 inch (double layer tiers) will give you 92 servings. 6/8/10 would give you the amount of servings that you need.

I haven't seen a picture of the cake you're planning on making but you said it looked like the bottm and top tiers were "single" layers. A single layer (2 inch pan) is going to be 2 inches tall or less. That isn't very tall for a tier. Anyway, like I said if you can attach a photo maybe we can better help you. Also, the Wilton pans that are sold seperately are better (have straight edge) than the ones that are sold in sets. I do recommend buying your pans seperately. The 9 inch pans are the only ones that don't have a straight edge. If you can fit (same size pans) inside one another then they don't have a straight edge.

Also the larger size cakes are more of a challenge to stack if you don't have alot of experience I'd suggest going with the smaller size pans. 16" is a fairly large cake.

LesaVaughn Posted 25 May 2010 , 1:50pm
post #10 of 13

I will try to post a pic. This is the general idea. It is a 4 tier, but I am going with 3. I asked about cardboard as I have only used the plates and have heard cardboard can draw moisture. Also, I am considering single tiers and not 2 layers. Still somewhat new to cakes but have taken Wilton courses.

LesaVaughn Posted 25 May 2010 , 1:54pm
post #11 of 13

Well posting pic did not work. It is not the fight size image

Bluehue Posted 25 May 2010 , 2:14pm
post #12 of 13

If the cake picture is on the internet - then just copy the link and paste it here for us to click on. thumbs_up.gif

Bluehue.

mamawrobin Posted 25 May 2010 , 2:43pm
post #13 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by LesaVaughn

I will try to post a pic. This is the general idea. It is a 4 tier, but I am going with 3. I asked about cardboard as I have only used the plates and have heard cardboard can draw moisture. Also, I am considering single tiers and not 2 layers. Still somewhat new to cakes but have taken Wilton courses.





I've always used cardboard and never had any problem. It holds up just fine. It may get a few grease spots (which aren't seen anyway) but it doesn't get "soft" or anything. You said that you've only "used the plates" but have you ever stacked a cake? I've never taken any classes so I'm not sure what Wilton teaches in their courses. I guess if you've taken all of the Wilton courses then you probably have.

I'm sure you'll do fine and your granddaughter will be very happy with her cake. thumbs_up.gif

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%