How Do You Transport Tall/large Cakes?

Decorating By e2_erin Updated 30 Aug 2013 , 3:43pm by leah_s

e2_erin Posted 23 May 2010 , 1:42am
post #1 of 17

I LOVE to make large 3D carved cakes and I havent had trouble with them because I either dont take them anywhere or I only have to travel a very short distance.
Well I want to travel about 25 mins with a cake this time and I dont really know what to do with it. Do you cover them or not? If so what do you cover them with that doesnt mess up the icing?

I was thinking of making one of those 3 tiered or mad hatter style cakes this time so it wouldnt be one that I could just separate and assemble at the location.
Any advice?

16 replies
michiparma Posted 23 May 2010 , 2:08am
post #2 of 17

You transport them VERY carefully! icon_lol.gif Sorry, couldn't resist! icon_smile.gif

I did a 3 tiered cake last weekend and was able to fit the top two tiers stacked in my wilton carrier while I drove with the bottom (and biggest) tier on the passenger seat next to me. No, it wasn't in a box but I did travel about 20-25 minutes away and was very cautious and careful while driving. HTH.

patticake1951 Posted 23 May 2010 , 2:46am
post #3 of 17

I bought one of the large totes from WM to put mine in for a cake I had to deliver today. I turned it upside down and placed the cake on it then put the bottom over it. It was a 3 tier stacked cake. It worked pretty good.

leah_s Posted 23 May 2010 , 2:47am
post #4 of 17

OMG, never put a cake on the passenger seat.

I've grown fond of the BakeryCrafts cake box delivery system that's made especially for stacked cakes.

cakeville82 Posted 23 May 2010 , 2:47am
post #5 of 17

I transport 4 tiers and under fully assembled, same with 3-D cakes.
A center dowel and chilling them thoroughly helps with transport.
You canalso look into SPS, I've nothing but good things about it.
I always box the cakes (don't want any fuzzies landing on it), even tiered and large cakes.
You can make a large box by using 2 individual cake boxes, one for the bottom and one for the lid, like this.
Image

e2_erin Posted 23 May 2010 , 2:52am
post #6 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by cakeville82

I transport 4 tiers and under fully assembled, same with 3-D cakes.
A center dowel and chilling them thoroughly helps with transport.
You canalso look into SPS, I've nothing but good things about it.
I always box the cakes (don't want any fuzzies landing on it), even tiered and large cakes.
You can make a large box by using 2 individual cake boxes, one for the bottom and one for the lid, like this.
Image




Wow so simple yet I probably would have never thought of that. Thank you!!

QueenMo Posted 23 May 2010 , 4:36am
post #7 of 17

i always take my cake in the passengers seat, but then again, my husband usually drives and i'm in the passengers seat holding the cake, lol. what's a good place to put it besides the passengers seat? my husband can't always be there for deliveries, lol i'm glad someone brought this up cause i was wondering about that the other day.

cheatize Posted 23 May 2010 , 5:52am
post #8 of 17

The floor of the vehicle is the best place, IMO. Seats are not level and neither are laps. Trunks may be level but the temperature in there can ruin a cake. Additionally, many trunks don't smell that swell. icon_smile.gif

michiparma Posted 24 May 2010 , 2:14am
post #9 of 17

I don't generally put them on the passenger seat. It was a cake that I didn't plan very well or else I would've bought a box, put it in it and had it on the floor or in the trunk. Still an amateur at best, decorating for others is still new and planning is not one of my best qualities! But I love every minute of it!

indydebi Posted 24 May 2010 , 3:10am
post #10 of 17

cakeville, is it possible for you to edit your post and
make the photos smaller? The large pics are causing
the narrative to run off of the right side of my screen
..... I have no scroll bar to move to the right to read
the comments and the quote button is unavailable to
me (which is what I usually can click on to read a
whole post when this happens). If it's possible ...thx! thumbs_up.gif
(Hard returns entered in this post to get the sentences
to show up ok.)

tirby Posted 1 Jun 2010 , 5:24pm
post #11 of 17

I'm with Indy I cant read it all

Chasey Posted 1 Jun 2010 , 5:35pm
post #12 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

cakeville, is it possible for you to edit your post and
make the photos smaller?




I can't see the photo, only the text. icon_lol.gif Does this help you:

I transport 4 tiers and under fully assembled, same with 3-D cakes.
A center dowel and chilling them thoroughly helps with transport.
You can also look into SPS, I've (heard) nothing but good things about it.
I always box the cakes (don't want any fuzzies landing on it), even tiered and large cakes.
You can make a large box by using 2 individual cake boxes, one for the bottom and one for the lid, like this.

arosstx Posted 1 Jun 2010 , 6:21pm
post #13 of 17

Agree with others, floor of the vehicle is best. Cold air sinks, so the floor is not only level, but the coolest place in the vehicle. I use SPS, so transporting 20 minutes or 2 hours is really not an issue. I also like the BC boxes leahs mentioned, but you have to have access to buy them from BC and they are not cheap, so you have to be able to get it back so it can be reused!

Good luck!

seshultz62 Posted 30 Aug 2013 , 11:38am
post #14 of 17

Well, I feel dumb.  What is sps?  I have been asked to do a 3 tier that I have to assemble at the hall because it will have a long swag (drape?).  I have always assembled at the hall, so now very nervous about delivering this cake.  It will be about a 25 minute drive.  I planned on running a wooden dowel down through the center.  I see them delivering these on tv all the time and have always said "that would scare me to death".  Now I'm facing that.  Mostly, I am just curious what sps is that 2 of you have mentioned.  I have an suv that I can set the cake in the back, so that part is not a problem. Thank you for any helpful comments and telling me what sps is!

leah_s Posted 30 Aug 2013 , 12:08pm
post #15 of 17

ARead my signature line

howsweet Posted 30 Aug 2013 , 3:25pm
post #16 of 17

The key to delivering a cake is stacking it properly to begin with.  A 3 tier cake will sit on the passenger side floor board of many cars. That spot is always my first choice for delivering. But it won't work if you're going to put the cake in a bulky box.   If it won't fit, then it has to go in the back.  I know a lot of people think ebola virus and skin eating bacteria are floating through the air just waiting for a cake to come along, but in my opinion, boxing a cake is just asking for it to get damaged.

 

Even with smaller cakes, when you hand them off, the first thing people want to do is push the sides in and smoosh the cake. I find without a box, no one rushes up to me to grab the cake and if they do want to take it , they are more careful.

 

The other thing about driving with cake is you have to leave a wide berth in front of you like an 18 wheeler because you don't have the luxury of quick stops. Always be aware of leaving tons of space in front, so you don't have to brake harder than you might otherwise. I tend to leave the hazard lights on until I get to the freeway because the roads aren't smooth enough and I go about 18 mph. Once on the freeway, I can go as fast as everyone else, but still leave the wide berth.

leah_s Posted 30 Aug 2013 , 3:43pm
post #17 of 17

A^ THIS

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