I Think I Messed Up!!!!!!!!!!!

Decorating By dvergara Updated 23 May 2010 , 4:02pm by KayMc

dvergara Posted 22 May 2010 , 4:03pm
post #1 of 16

We were ahead by one day so we decided since it was almost 87 degrees yesterday, I put the cake in the freezer. Well we took the cake out and now the cake is condestating. What should we do, I think I need to stop freaking out icon_surprised.gif

15 replies
Montrealconfections Posted 22 May 2010 , 4:16pm
post #2 of 16

I'd put it in the fridge to slow down the tempeture change

Kiddiekakes Posted 22 May 2010 , 4:16pm
post #3 of 16

It should dry off and evaporate .Try using a small fan blowing on it lightly.

mamawrobin Posted 22 May 2010 , 5:53pm
post #4 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by dvergara

We were ahead by one day so we decided since it was almost 87 degrees yesterday, I put the cake in the freezer. Well we took the cake out and now the cake is condestating. What should we do, I think I need to stop freaking out icon_surprised.gif





I'm confused as to why you put your cake in the freezer? icon_confused.gif It was 95 degress here yesterday and I had three cake orders. None of them even went into the refrigerator. I NEVER refrigerate my cakes (I don't use perishable fillings) I do use milk in my buttercream but still it needs no refrigeration. If you refrigerate/freeze your cakes you are going to get condensation every time. Especially when it's hot. It's one reason Edna says she never refrigerates a cake.

KayMc Posted 22 May 2010 , 6:01pm
post #5 of 16

There's so many contrary opinions. I was just reading a post this morning where a lot of people were saying they ALWAYS freeze their cakes as they taste better. And there's the other group that says they never cool their cakes in the fridge or freezer. I guess it's going to be a trial and error with me, until I can make my own opinion.

CWR41 Posted 22 May 2010 , 6:16pm
post #6 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by KayMc

There's so many contrary opinions. I was just reading a post this morning where a lot of people were saying they ALWAYS freeze their cakes as they taste better. And there's the other group that says they never cool their cakes in the fridge or freezer. I guess it's going to be a trial and error with me, until I can make my own opinion.




I think the difference is, the OP was referring to a finished decorated cake, and a lot of people that ALWAYS freeze their cakes are referring to the cooled layers that are baked before decorating.

KayMc Posted 22 May 2010 , 9:02pm
post #7 of 16

Yes, CWR41, I think you're right. I have put two baked and cooled 8" layers in the freezer this morning, as this was when I could bake them. My upcoming week is crazy, so I got this part of the cake out of the way. I'm hoping the freezing isn't a problem.......

CWR41 Posted 22 May 2010 , 10:04pm
post #8 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by KayMc

Yes, CWR41, I think you're right. I have put two baked and cooled 8" layers in the freezer this morning, as this was when I could bake them. My upcoming week is crazy, so I got this part of the cake out of the way. I'm hoping the freezing isn't a problem.......




No... you're goodit will be fine. Lots of cakes are frozen all the timewhether decorated or undecoratedand shipped all around the world... just need to expect condensation as they thaw.

mamawrobin Posted 22 May 2010 , 10:44pm
post #9 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by KayMc

There's so many contrary opinions. I was just reading a post this morning where a lot of people were saying they ALWAYS freeze their cakes as they taste better. And there's the other group that says they never cool their cakes in the fridge or freezer. I guess it's going to be a trial and error with me, until I can make my own opinion.




I DO freeze my cake layers quite often. I just don't ever put a decorated cake in the refrigerator or freezer. thumbs_up.gif

tracey1970 Posted 23 May 2010 , 1:51am
post #10 of 16

I freeze my cake layers every time - undecorated and well wrapped. It also makes a difference whether your decorated and frozen cake was covered in fondant or BC.

Karen421 Posted 23 May 2010 , 2:02am
post #11 of 16

Dvergara- don't panic - is it fondant or bc? put it in the refrigerator to thaw, then let it come to room temp. It should be Ok.

Tellis12 Posted 23 May 2010 , 2:17am
post #12 of 16

I agree, put it in the fridge to slow it down. You need to bring it to temp slowly to avoid collecting too much moisture.

I made this huge mistake last summer on my first wedding cake. I put it in my normal, upright freezer the day before I was going to deliver it (looking back, I'm not sure why!). The morning of the wedding, I took it out and waited for it to thaw and then I was going to take it to the venue. However, as it thawed, it began to get lots and lots of condensation on it! Eventually, it had so much condensation that the water mixed with the sugar in the syrup and made a syrup on the cake. It was a complete disaster. I had to almost completely re-ice the cake. When I posted about it later, someone explained that freezer we have in our homes aren't humidity controlled like the ones commercial kitchens have, such as walk-ins. This allowed moisture to build on my cake, making a complete mess.

So never freeze a finished cake, unless you have a commercial freezer, or one that is humidity controlled. I do frequently freeze my unfrosted layers, but that's a different thing entirely. Good luck!

Marianna46 Posted 23 May 2010 , 2:34am
post #13 of 16

Actually, the amount of humidity in the freezer has very little to do with it. It's the amount of humidity in the air when you defrost it that condenses on the cake.

KayMc Posted 23 May 2010 , 2:41pm
post #14 of 16

OK, then, my question is this: I have two layers of cake, each individually double wrapped, in the freezer. I need to get them out Monday to thaw so I can crumb coat Tuesday morning. How do I thaw these guys? Do I unwrap them to thaw, or leave them wrapped? I have them in plastic wrap, and then that is inside a zippered freezer bag.

DianeLM Posted 23 May 2010 , 2:58pm
post #15 of 16

Kay, leave them wrapped to thaw at room temp. Condensation will form on the outside of the wrapping.

KayMc Posted 23 May 2010 , 4:02pm
post #16 of 16

Thank you so much, Diane!

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