Strawberry And Pastry Cream Filling - Need Help Soon!

Decorating By ixybella Updated 22 May 2010 , 3:00am by dawncr

ixybella Posted 20 May 2010 , 4:16pm
post #1 of 15

I appreciate your quick replies! What do you think about using vanilla pudding for pastry cream? Or is there something special about pastry cream? Thanks for your expertise!

14 replies
BeanCountingBaker Posted 20 May 2010 , 4:34pm
post #2 of 15

If the request was for pastry cream I don't believe pudding would be a good substitution. My husband has had me on a quest for a recipe the mimics the pastry cream filling in the cream horns from the bakery in his home town. I've tried 5 or 6 recipes but still haven't found the right variation.

all4cake Posted 20 May 2010 , 4:43pm
post #3 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by BeanCountingBaker

If the request was for pastry cream I don't believe pudding would be a good substitution. My husband has had me on a quest for a recipe the mimics the pastry cream filling in the cream horns from the bakery in his home town. I've tried 5 or 6 recipes but still haven't found the right variation.




is your DH from around here? lol icon_biggrin.gif

The elusive cream horn filling...every town seems to have a bakery that has special "filling that's in the cream horn!" filling. I'd thought about looking at the formula when I was working for the town's oldest bakery...but couldn't bring myself to doing it ...the thought of looking at it (although it wasn't hidden or anything) was like the thought of reading someone else's diary... thumbsdown.gif .

rvercher23 Posted 20 May 2010 , 4:45pm
post #4 of 15

I use pastry cream all the time. I would not substitute pudding for it. It has a similiar taste, but I can definately tell the difference. I dont like pudding because if it is not cold, it gets runny. Any time I have used pastry cream, it stays pretty solid. I am not a pastry chef, I can just speak from my own experience. Good Luck. Hope it works out!

sillywabbitz Posted 20 May 2010 , 5:08pm
post #5 of 15

One thing that I like to use as a "quick" sub for pastry cream is white chocolate pudding whipped with whipping cream..it makes like a white chocolate mousse but it's more solid than regular pudding..great flavor. It is NOT pastry cream but I think it works well when you can't get it. It requires refridgeration but it's very yummy. I think if you did the same with Rich's Bettercreme you could get away without refridgeration but I've never used Rich's.

all4cake Posted 20 May 2010 , 5:28pm
post #6 of 15

I just finished looking at several pastry cream recipes...they all just look like basic pudding recipes with fewer eggs and more thickeners like cornstarch...

Why you wouldn't be able to sub pudding for pastry cream if your pudding was thickened, I have no idea...

all4cake Posted 20 May 2010 , 5:31pm
post #7 of 15

I found one that is almost identical to my pudding recipe...(maybe I've been using pastry cream all these years and calling it pudding?)

http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-pastry-cream.htm

ixybella Posted 20 May 2010 , 10:08pm
post #8 of 15

Thank you everyone for all your advice! I am going to find some pastry creme and use that. Just not brave enough to go out on a limb and try to make my own. (Why couldn't my first "paid" cake just have a nice and easy BC filling?!?) You all are so wonderful to help us newbies!

Elcee Posted 20 May 2010 , 10:49pm
post #9 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by all4cake

I found one that is almost identical to my pudding recipe...(maybe I've been using pastry cream all these years and calling it pudding?)

http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-pastry-cream.htm




all4cake, usually someone asking about substituting pudding for pastry cream isn't talking about pudding made from scratch icon_smile.gif .

NO offense meant to anyone...just saying!

all4cake Posted 20 May 2010 , 11:12pm
post #10 of 15

Oh, for real? I'll have to pay more attention to what they mean when they ask. I kinda gathered she wasn't into scratchin' when she stated she wasn't brave enough.

well...maybe it'll help someone who scratches should they have a similar question...

NO offense taken ...none by me anyway.

Still...if in scratch it's so similar (if not the same...depending on the recipe), wouldn't instant or pre-made be similar?

Elcee Posted 20 May 2010 , 11:37pm
post #11 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by all4cake

Oh, for real? I'll have to pay more attention to what they mean when they ask. I kinda gathered she wasn't into scratchin' when she stated she wasn't brave enough.

well...maybe it'll help someone who scratches should they have a similar question...

NO offense taken ...none by me anyway.

Still...if in scratch it's so similar (if not the same...depending on the recipe), wouldn't instant or pre-made be similar?




Not IMO; even the cooked versions of store bought puddings are nowhere near as thick and creamy as scratch pudding or pastry cream. I would be able to tell the difference immediately. Not that there would be anything wrong with storebought pudding as a filling, but if someone is PAYING for and expecting pastry cream then that's what they should get. Again, just saying icon_smile.gif.

all4cake Posted 21 May 2010 , 2:41am
post #12 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Elcee

Quote:
Originally Posted by all4cake

Oh, for real? I'll have to pay more attention to what they mean when they ask. I kinda gathered she wasn't into scratchin' when she stated she wasn't brave enough.

well...maybe it'll help someone who scratches should they have a similar question...

NO offense taken ...none by me anyway.

Still...if in scratch it's so similar (if not the same...depending on the recipe), wouldn't instant or pre-made be similar?



Not IMO; even the cooked versions of store bought puddings are nowhere near as thick and creamy as scratch pudding or pastry cream. I would be able to tell the difference immediately. Not that there would be anything wrong with storebought pudding as a filling, but if someone is PAYING for and expecting pastry cream then that's what they should get. Again, just saying icon_smile.gif.




for clarification only, does that refer to the boxed mixes, when cooked?

My question was more a ponderance...

If scratch pudding similar/same to scratch pastry cream

would store bought pudding be similar/same to store bought pastry cream (I don't know as I don't buy it)

but not to say that scratch pudding/pastry is same/similar to store bought pudding/pastry cream

Elcee Posted 21 May 2010 , 11:24pm
post #13 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by all4cake

[

for clarification only, does that refer to the boxed mixes, when cooked?

My question was more a ponderance...

If scratch pudding similar/same to scratch pastry cream

would store bought pudding be similar/same to store bought pastry cream (I don't know as I don't buy it)

but not to say that scratch pudding/pastry is same/similar to store bought pudding/pastry cream




You're right, I was comparing apples and oranges I guess. I was thinking of the little boxes of Jello Cook and Serve pudding in comparison to pastry cream from scratch. I didn't even know you could buy pastry cream. I always make mine. My original reply was because these kinds of questions (replace pastry cream with pudding is really just a "for instance") wouldn't make sense if the OP was talking about either one from scratch. I read it as can I save myself from the trouble of separating eggs, cooking milk, whisking, thickening, etc. and just mix powder and milk. icon_wink.gif

all4cake Posted 22 May 2010 , 2:43am
post #14 of 15

Aaaaaaaaaah..."I seeeeeeeeeee." said the blind man. that actually makes more sense.

I don't know if it can be bought or not...seems like it's available in those sleeves (or maybe someone substituted one of the sleeved fillings for it...hmmmmm)

dawncr Posted 22 May 2010 , 3:00am
post #15 of 15

I don't like Jello pudding, cooked or instant, but when I want a pastry-cream filling, I use Bird's custard mix. I mix it with whole milk and cook it on the stovetop.

Bird's is a staple in the UK, and to me, it tastes less 'chemically' than Jello brand. It also is a bit less sweet. I'm not from the UK, but I think it's used in trifles, mainly. I love it!

Too bad I have to purchase it online or take a trip to the international food store to find it. I'm unsure, but you might be able to find it in Indian groceries in the States.

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