selfconclusion12 Posted 20 May 2010 , 4:12am
post #1 of

I have worked in a bakery, and by no means am I a pro, but I keep seeing the word come up everywhere around here, and I have never heard it before. What is it, and should I be doing it??

Thanks icon_smile.gif

45 replies
indydebi Posted 20 May 2010 , 4:29am
post #2 of

Torting is slicing a cake into layers, such as taking a 2" single layer of cake and slicing it into two 1" layers of cake. Here's a simple how to video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mNix3qZ3qnk

It's really pretty when the cake is cut and there are 4 layers of cake and 3 layers of filling, like this one: http://www.flickr.com/photos/55969028@N00/445561652/

selfconclusion12 Posted 20 May 2010 , 4:36am
post #3 of

Oh yeah, we did this at the bakery but just called it splitting, lol.

Thanks!

malakainrop Posted 20 May 2010 , 5:50am
post #4 of

Don't want to be seen to be correcting the Forum Matriarch... icon_surprised.gificon_surprised.gificon_surprised.gif

BUT.... a torte is actually the name for the CAKE not the process.

The word "Torte".

A torte is a cake, YES - it is cut into layers and filled - think Sachertorte etc.
Its not how a cake is cut & filled with something that is a technique called "torting" - it really IS cutting & filling & layering - not "to torte a cake"

It's one of those words that seems to have just been used in the wrong sense and run like wildfire - so it becomes so commonplace to hear it used wrongly that you believe it to be true

selfconclusion12 Posted 20 May 2010 , 6:04am
post #5 of

Okay--I see people saying I bake the cakes, cool them, tort them, and crumb coat them.

What does it mean in this sense?

malakainrop Posted 20 May 2010 , 6:19am
post #6 of

Another example of the word being used incorrectly LOL

"Okay--I see people saying I bake the cakes, cool them, tort them, and crumb coat them."

In this example the word "tort" has been used to describe the process of slicing a cake into even layers and reassembling it with filling in between - which is what a TORTE .... CAKE .... is icon_biggrin.gif

Bluehue Posted 20 May 2010 , 6:20am
post #7 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by malakainrop

Don't want to be seen to be correcting the Forum Matriarch... icon_surprised.gificon_surprised.gificon_surprised.gif

BUT.... a torte is actually the name for the CAKE not the process.

The word "Torte".

A torte is a cake, YES - it is cut into layers and filled - think Sachertorte etc.
Its not how a cake is cut & filled with something that is a technique called "torting" - it really IS cutting & filling & layering - not "to torte a cake"

It's one of those words that seems to have just been used in the wrong sense and run like wildfire - so it becomes so commonplace to hear it used wrongly that you believe it to be true





icon_surprised.gificon_confused.gif

In my mid 50's and i learnt how to tort a cake from my GM many moons ago. Don't know anyone here is Australia who doesn't use the term when referring to filling a cake.

Perhaps it is just *new* to you - wherever you are. *shrugs*

Tort and Torte are two different things.

Tort = divide/split
Torte= elaborate sweet cake or tart.

Bluehue.

selfconclusion12 Posted 20 May 2010 , 6:42am
post #8 of

Ty! I meant Tort, so I understand what it means now. I have heard of Torte being a tart or something very sweet, but I have never heard of the word Tort.

Thanks!!

Bluehue Posted 20 May 2010 , 6:47am
post #9 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by selfconclusion12

Ty! I meant Tort, so I understand what it means now. I have heard of Torte being a tart or something very sweet, but I have never heard of the word Tort.

Thanks!!




For a long time i kept seeing the word *layering* on here and i assummed (wrongly or rightly) that the posters meant torting

If that makes sense - lolllllllll

Plus it depends where you are in the world - different terms used in different countries.


Bluehue. icon_smile.gif

malakainrop Posted 20 May 2010 , 6:56am

I see you have got the gist .... and we could all argue the toss about word meaning forever and still not agree -

It's one of the basic terminology TAUGHT (pun intended) at Pastry school

I am happy that I am correct - others who choose to disagree are completely free to do so!!
,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,
DEFINITIONS
Noun
1. tort, civil wrong
((law) any wrongdoing for which an action for damages may be brought)

,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,


Noun
1. torte
(rich cake usually covered with cream and fruit or nuts; originated in Austria)

vonnie222 Posted 20 May 2010 , 8:48am

Ditto Bluehue, couldn't have said it better myself. thumbs_up.gif

costumeczar Posted 20 May 2010 , 10:48am

But she's right, a tort is a law term and torte is a type of cake. I don't know why people don't want to grasp that, but anyone who wants to misspell and misuse a term is obviously free to do so.

heidemarie Posted 20 May 2010 , 11:12am

Malakainrop, I agree with You too!

artscallion Posted 20 May 2010 , 11:53am

"Tort" (without the 'e') is a legal term and has nothing to do with cake. "torte" (with an 'e') is a noun, not a verb. BUT, "torte" is commonly used as a verb in the same way that "trash" is. "trash" is a noun, not a verb. But many people use it as a verb..."I'm going to trash this." "he really trashed her."

Of course it's slang. But language is not static. It evolves with the way we choose to use it as a group. As demonstrated by the fact that the OP did not ask, "what dost thou meanest by torting thou torte?"

So, everybody's correctish. (it's a word!)

indydebi Posted 20 May 2010 , 12:11pm

Would this be something like when I say "I Melvira my cakes"? icon_confused.gificon_biggrin.gif

Meowcakes Posted 20 May 2010 , 1:14pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by artscallion

"Tort" (without the 'e') is a legal term and has nothing to do with cake. "torte" (with an 'e') is a noun, not a verb. BUT, "torte" is commonly used as a verb in the same way that "trash" is. "trash" is a noun, not a verb. But many people use it as a verb..."I'm going to trash this." "he really trashed her."

Of course it's slang. But language is not static. It evolves with the way we choose to use it as a group. As demonstrated by the fact that the OP did not ask, "what dost thou meanest by torting thou torte?"

So, everybody's correctish. (it's a word!)




icon_lol.gificon_cry.gificon_lol.gificon_cry.gificon_lol.gificon_cry.gificon_lol.gifthumbs_up.gifthumbs_up.gifthumbs_up.gif

tiggy2 Posted 20 May 2010 , 3:27pm

Just because a term has been used doesn't mean it's correct. I'm sure if Indy looks up "Melvira a cake" it wont be found. I hope you aren't holding yu\\our breath waiting for us to go metric.

Mama_Mias_Cakes Posted 20 May 2010 , 3:30pm

Really?? 2 pages of this. If you want to use, then use it. If you don't, because you feel that it is not "correct" then don't. Geesh. icon_rolleyes.gif

Meowcakes Posted 20 May 2010 , 3:30pm

Wow. And they call Americans rude. I always like seeing the U.S. get attacked for our "know it all" attitude. Yet, when the worls needs help they don't seem to mind our "know it all" U.S. azzes coming through. And hey, this is an U.S. based forum. Don't come on here if you don't care for our "know it all" attitude.

Chasey Posted 20 May 2010 , 3:31pm

My goodness, I didn't read any replies that would have evoked such a passionate post from down under! I guess it's because I didn't make a comment earlier so it doesn't feel personal?

Bluehue, I don't think citizens of the USA think the world revolves around us. It's great to have members from all over the planet giving their two cents, their culture, their tips on a hobby/career that binds us all together.

No one gets to be be right or wrong when it comes to tradition. icon_biggrin.gif

Marianna46 Posted 20 May 2010 , 3:32pm

Dictionaries record language, they don't prescribe it. They scramble to keep up with what people are saying, and language continually changes. I'm surprised (but, as a professional linguist, not unduly so) that dictionaries haven't caught up with our specialized use of "tort", but they eventually will.

indydebi Posted 20 May 2010 , 3:38pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chasey

It's great to have members from all over the planet giving their two cents, their culture, their tips on a hobby/career that binds us all together.



Heck yeah! It's how I learned what a "rellie" and a "tooter" was ('coz what *I* call a tooter ain't NUTHIN' like what Bluehue and our other Australian friends refer to as a "tooter"! icon_lol.gificon_lol.gif )

Bluehue Posted 20 May 2010 , 3:40pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by Meowcakes

Wow. And they call Americans rude. I always like seeing the U.S. get attacked for our "know it all" attitude. Yet, when the worls needs help they don't seem to mind our "know it all" U.S. azzes coming through. And hey, this is an U.S. based forum. Don't come on here if you don't care for our "know it all" attitude.





LOLLLL - thought my post would make you appear - icon_lol.gificon_lol.gificon_lol.gif
I'm not going to war with you on this one -
Last time was bad enough icon_wink.gif

Bluehue.-

costumeczar Posted 20 May 2010 , 3:50pm

Bluehue, did it ever occur to you that the verb form of the word "torte" is spelled "torting"? You're still misspelling "torte" every time you spell it. Like I said before, a tort is a legal term, a torte is a cake.

Also, you refer to the ganache thread like nobody in the world other than Australians use ganache or know what it is. If I'm correct, isn't ganache a French term? I guess other countries do know about it, and in the thread that you're referring to you were telling people to NEVER refrigerate cakes with ganache. You seemed to be unaware that in other countries people use perishable fillings with ganache-covered cakes, so you were wrong on that too.

Don't criticize other people for giving different advice than you do, since you seem to be misinformed a lot.

mariana7842731 Posted 20 May 2010 , 4:07pm

let's change the tone of....hahaha. what a crab!

PinkZiab Posted 20 May 2010 , 4:22pm

The meanings of words evolve over time with common usage. Many of the words we use today did not mean what they now do when they first came into use. Language is not static, it's constantly changing and evolving (if it was, Merriam-Webster wouldn't really have much work to do these days), and words take on new meanings over time.

smokeysmokerton Posted 20 May 2010 , 4:28pm

Is there a "Who gives a flying fart" icon?? I've seen some silly arguments here but this one....jeebus.

Bluehue Posted 20 May 2010 , 4:28pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by costumeczar

Bluehue, did it ever occur to you that the verb form of the word "torte" is spelled "torting"? You're still misspelling "torte" every time you spell it. Like I said before, a tort is a legal term, a torte is a cake.
Yep - that occured to me -
How do you get Torte = elaborate sweet cake or tart anywhere near torting.
You don't Tort a tart ............. well maybe you do -i*shrugs*

Also, you refer to the ganache thread like nobody in the world other than Australians use ganache or know what it is. If I'm correct, isn't ganache a French term?
Yes indeed - and sorry for not including the WORDS UK and Europe and Canada and Spain and every other Non American country in my above post - i thought i covered that with *us Non Americans* - my mistake.

I guess other countries do know about it, and in the thread that you're referring to you were telling people to NEVER refrigerate cakes with ganache. Thats correct - i have also suggested in other threads - *there is no need to refrigerate ganached cakes - You seemed to be unaware that in other countries people use perishable fillings with ganache-covered cakes, so you were wrong on that too.
No - i was not wrong - i refer to ganache and ganached cakes - not cakes filled with perishable filings - fruit - custards - yadda yadda yadda - Just cakes torted and filled with ganahe or covered with ganache.

Don't criticize other people for giving different advice than you do, since you seem to be misinformed a lot
Thankyou for that - perhaps i should inform those worldy people who taught me and mention that what they did teach me - is wrong.
You won't mind if i cut this conversation short so as i can scurry off and tear up and burn all my certificates and paperwork form learning and studying in other countries - about torting and ganaching - oh and all the European and UK books i have collected on my word travels - as they must have surely misprinted all that i was taught.
Again - thankyou for pointing that out to me - i guess i am not a *caker* at all - but just a person who bakes - torts and ganaches cakes.

But hey - you have to give me credit for one thing - i don't bang on about MMF - because i don't like it - make it - or use it.
I leave that subject up to those who know about it and how to do it the right way.

Enjoy your day -



Bluehue.
.

.


cakeville82 Posted 20 May 2010 , 4:29pm

But Americans do know everything, in fact we know so much that we know that we know everything.
See there that's proof that we know everything, what more do you need, plus we invented the Internet so a thank you would be appreciated.

Well I don't know about anyone else I'm off to cut my cake horizontally into multiple layers and then alternate the layers of individual cake with filling in which I will then cover with a thick layer of ganache that I invented about 12 months ago.

Amanda621 Posted 20 May 2010 , 4:39pm

WOW. I have been a member for some time now, and never posted when I first joined because all of the posts ended badly.Not too long ago I started posting things, noticing that the tone had changed and everyone was helpful. Now I log in this week and see this, the disco dust discussion and the ganache topic. What is the point in all of this? I feel very sorry for the new members who join and ask simple questions and have their topic turned into a battlefield. I am not a professional baker, nor am I even a hobby baker. I bake about once a year, if I feel like it. But I LOVE this site, and I love all the different information I gain from it. However, if things continue to go the way they are going, I dont know how much longer this site will be informative.

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