Follow-Up After Cake Delivered

Business By FH_Cakes Updated 18 May 2010 , 12:03am by Kitagrl

FH_Cakes Posted 17 May 2010 , 6:30pm
post #1 of 17

Do you follow-up after the cake has been delivered? I need more reviews on my website, would it be unprofessional to ask how the cake was and ask for a review?

16 replies
melmar02 Posted 17 May 2010 , 6:48pm
post #2 of 17

What if you enticed them into giving you a review? Maybe make up a batch of thank you cookies for your next batch of cakes. Put two or three in a bag with a note thanking them for their business and mentioning the review section of your website.

What about something short and sweet like "Thank you for your business. Please take a moment to post a review on my website www....com. I look forward to working with you again in the future."

cakemom42 Posted 17 May 2010 , 6:48pm
post #3 of 17

Yes :0)
I always send an e-mail asking how the event went.
If it comes back positive I ask them to write a reveiw...
I also in the past have sent small gifts for the bigger orders as a "Thank you for your order".
(I had travel coffee mugs made w/my logo on it). Which for my clientel (Military) worked very well :0)

PS: I also make my own thank you notes, more personal.

indydebi Posted 17 May 2010 , 9:32pm
post #4 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by FH_Cakes

Do you follow-up after the cake has been delivered?


No. because as a customer, this kind of stuff irritates me and I tend to develop a "I'm not ordering from her because she just wont' leave you alone afterward."

sari66 Posted 17 May 2010 , 9:39pm
post #5 of 17

Nope, if they have an issue they'll call and if I don't hear from them it means to me everything was great.

Elcee Posted 17 May 2010 , 10:25pm
post #6 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

Quote:
Originally Posted by FH_Cakes

Do you follow-up after the cake has been delivered?

No. because as a customer, this kind of stuff irritates me and I tend to develop a "I'm not ordering from her because she just wont' leave you alone afterward."




Agree completely.

tracycakes Posted 17 May 2010 , 11:22pm
post #7 of 17

I haven't but I feel great when I do get a followup from them, especially if they loved it. Luckily, that's all I have received back so far.

I thought about just sending a followup thanking them for their business.

PinkLisa Posted 17 May 2010 , 11:29pm
post #8 of 17

I disagree. I think it's perfectly fine to request a review from a client. Reviews are critial for many websites. If you don't ask, you'll never get a review. You may want to only ask reviews though from clients that have contacted you with positive comments. Probably half will email you to thank you and then you can ask for a review. Otherwise, why open up a can of worms if they are not happy. Over time you will build up your review. Good luck!

Kitagrl Posted 17 May 2010 , 11:37pm
post #9 of 17

I would wait for the customer to write you back with a "thank you"...many of them (but not all) will...and then if they do, that kind of opens up with "I'm so glad you liked your cake! Would you mind writing an official review for my website?" or something like that.

I did that with a couple of customers earlier on in my business...once they wrote a kind email, I asked them if I could use their words for a review OR I just asked for a review. I would wait for them to contact you, though, first.

artscallion Posted 17 May 2010 , 11:43pm
post #10 of 17

Never invite a customer to post a review on your website unless you know for damn sure what that review will be. There's nothing worse than a site filled with half-hearted reviews or surprise negative ones by folks who would have let a minor disappointment go until you goaded them into posting it on your site.

If someone sends me a positive note, unsolicited, I can be sure of what it says and cut and paste appropriate quotes from it onto my site myself.

One of my first rules of business is that I am in the service industry and exist because my customers need me to make their lives better and easier. So NO POKING AND PESTERING THE CUSTOMER. This goes for emails, mailers, badgering for minute details on what the cake should be, where it should go, what kind of center on the daisies, etc. Leave them alone, show up with something that makes them squeal and they'll remember you next time they want cake.

indydebi Posted 17 May 2010 , 11:47pm
post #11 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kitagrl

I would wait for the customer to write you back with a "thank you"......once they wrote a kind email, I asked them if I could use their words for a review OR I just asked for a review. I would wait for them to contact you, though, first.


I've done this ... gone back and thanked them for the kind words and got their permission to put it on my website.

To me .... asking for a review is soliciting a compliment. Which makes it, in my opinion, is not a compliment because it's not really sincere.

I have a very very low tolerance for 'fake-n-phony' and solicited compliments fall into that category for me.

jammjenks Posted 17 May 2010 , 11:48pm
post #12 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by artscallion

Never invite a customer to post a review on your website unless you know for damn sure what that review will be. There's nothing worse than a site filled with half-hearted reviews or surprise negative ones by folks who would have let a minor disappointment go until you goaded them into posting it on your site.

If someone sends me a positive note, unsolicited, I can be sure of what it says and cut and paste appropriate quotes from it onto my site myself.

One of my first rules of business is that I am in the service industry and exist because my customers need me to make their lives better and easier. So NO POKING AND PESTERING THE CUSTOMER. This goes for emails, mailers, badgering for minute details on what the cake should be, where it should go, what kind of center on the daisies, etc. Leave them alone, show up with something that makes them squeal and they'll remember you next time they want cake.




I love you.

indydebi Posted 17 May 2010 , 11:50pm
post #13 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by artscallion

So NO POKING AND PESTERING THE CUSTOMER. This goes for emails, mailers, badgering for minute details on what the cake should be, where it should go, what kind of center on the daisies, etc. Leave them alone, show up with something that makes them squeal and they'll remember you next time they want cake.




YES!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

I hope everyone prints this off and tapes it to their computer screen!!!! thumbs_up.gif

artscallion Posted 17 May 2010 , 11:53pm
post #14 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by jammjenks



I love you.




Can I quote you on my website? icon_biggrin.gif

PinkLisa Posted 17 May 2010 , 11:55pm
post #15 of 17

I think it becomes obvious which clients want to manage minute details and which one give you artistic license (those I like). I send an email to the client with all the details for them to approve so there is no confusion on the details.

jammjenks Posted 18 May 2010 , 12:01am
post #16 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by artscallion

Quote:
Originally Posted by jammjenks



I love you.



Can I quote you on my website? icon_biggrin.gif




Absolutely! I'll go one better. Give me your site address and I'll do it myself. icon_wink.gif

Kitagrl Posted 18 May 2010 , 12:03am
post #17 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by PinkLisa

I think it becomes obvious which clients want to manage minute details and which one give you artistic license (those I like). I send an email to the client with all the details for them to approve so there is no confusion on the details.




I agree...some give me artistic license and I love them. haha. Others seem concerned about the details and have actually written me that they appreciate my few extra emails confirming colors or details or sizing that we maybe forgot to think about when we originally discussed the cake.

I also send emails to confirm pickup times and etc the week before the party.

Otherwise though once the transaction is over, its over...I don't contact the customer except occasionally I'll email them to let them know their cake is on my blog, but that's just if I think about it and think they'd want to see it.

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