Red Buttercream Frosting

Decorating By cturton Updated 16 May 2010 , 7:13pm by prterrell

cturton Posted 16 May 2010 , 2:47am
post #1 of 7

How do I color my buttercream frosting as red as possible without the nasty flavor that some reds leave?

6 replies
leily Posted 16 May 2010 , 2:49am
post #2 of 7

use Americolor red is the best advice I can give you.

If you only have wilton, color it pink first, then use the no-taste red to finish coloring it.

Also, try to make it 1-2 days before you need it, red (and other dark colors) get darker the longer they sit.

cakesondemand Posted 16 May 2010 , 3:10am
post #3 of 7

best way to make red is color you buttercream a darker pink then add the red takes less red color I use americolor

cakesrock Posted 16 May 2010 , 4:02am
post #4 of 7

I agree - Americolor all the way! I use the super red - you need less. I have tried other super reds and Americolor is simply the best.

Elcee Posted 16 May 2010 , 1:00pm
post #5 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by leily

use Americolor red is the best advice I can give you.

If you only have wilton, color it pink first, then use the no-taste red to finish coloring it.

Also, try to make it 1-2 days before you need it, red (and other dark colors) get darker the longer they sit.




I recently needed red buttercream and I used Americolor but I wasn't as impressed as I expected to be. I read on here all the time about this brand being so superior to Wilton but I didn't find that to be the case at all. Not saying it's inferior or not a good product, just that there didn't really seem to be much difference. After using 2 packages of Americolor super red I got what I considered just a decent red and the taste of my buttercream was affected by all that color.

percussiongrrl Posted 16 May 2010 , 1:45pm
post #6 of 7

I had major trouble getting red a couple months ago when I did a Mickey cake. So much so that I went into my local cake supply store and said "HELP!" Here is what the lady there recommended, and what I finally did:

She suggested a container of Americolor Super Red and a shade of pink. She said it is very important that the shade of pink is JUST a lighter red and contains no other hues (blue, purple, orange, etc), otherwise it apparently hinders the red coloring. She also suggested that she's had better luck getting red to "hold" in icing recipes that use milk instead of water. She told me to use the pink coloring, take it to the color shown on the lid (a medium shade of pink - it's much like what's on the bottom tier of my Hello Kitty cake), then add that much coloring again. (it was approx 5 drops to get it that color, 5 more to darken, for a whole batch) then start adding the Super Red. She advocated doing it in the Kitchen Aid as well, because she said that would prevent having "blobs" of gel hiding out elsewhere in the icing. She also suggested adding more powdered sugar if the consistency of the icing changed. I did have to do this, as well.

I ended up using about 1/2 of a small bottle of Super Red in addition to the pink but I got my color AND the flavor was still ok. I used the same technique to color my red fondant for a later cake, and it worked beautifully.

I hope that helps, and I hope I remembered to explain all the wisdom the lady at the shop gave me!

prterrell Posted 16 May 2010 , 7:13pm
post #7 of 7

Color as small amount as possible. The more icing you need to color, the harder it can seem to be to acheive a dark or deep, rich color.

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