Cracks?

Decorating By kcepenney Updated 16 May 2010 , 3:15am by mamawrobin

kcepenney Posted 16 May 2010 , 12:26am
post #1 of 18

How do you stop your cake from cracking? I was using BC and I moved it from my counter to the table and now it has all these cracks in the top. I was very sure to not lower one end of the cake but it still did it. It is so frustrating!! What am I doing wrong?????

17 replies
mamawrobin Posted 16 May 2010 , 12:30am
post #2 of 18

How were you moving your cake? Were you icing at the time? I'm just a little confused on exactly what you mean. icon_smile.gif
I also don't understand what you mean when saying you "tried not to lower one end of the cake, but it still did it"? Were you moving your cake without a cakeboard under it?

kcepenney Posted 16 May 2010 , 12:32am
post #3 of 18

No, it was all done. BC was "dry" and when I moved it there was all these cracks like where the cake moved when I moved it. Does that make sense?

mamawrobin Posted 16 May 2010 , 12:35am
post #4 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by kcepenney

No, it was all done. BC was "dry" and when I moved it there was all these cracks like where the cake moved when I moved it. Does that make sense?




What is your cake supported with? Cakeboard, plate?

BlakesCakes Posted 16 May 2010 , 12:35am
post #5 of 18

I assume you mean that your crusting buttercream cracked.

That usually means that your cake board isn't strong enough and is flexing under the weight of the cake. If you use a stronger cake board, it will help the problem.

HTH
Rae

mamawrobin Posted 16 May 2010 , 12:37am
post #6 of 18

Rae, I think you're right. But I think her cake actually cracked as well. I agree that the cakeboard wasn't supporting the cake.

kcepenney Posted 16 May 2010 , 12:45am
post #7 of 18

No, it was all done. BC was "dry" and when I moved it there was all these cracks like where the cake moved when I moved it. Does that make sense?

BlakesCakes Posted 16 May 2010 , 12:47am
post #8 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by kcepenney

No, it was all done. BC was "dry" and when I moved it there was all these cracks like where the cake moved when I moved it. Does that make sense?




Yes, and that's exactly why I wrote the answer I did.

Crusting buttercreams do this if the cake "gives" when it's moved.

This is most often due to not enough support from the cake board the cake is on. You can double or triple cardboard boards to increase support. I use foam core boards and don't have this issue.

Rae

mamawrobin Posted 16 May 2010 , 12:48am
post #9 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by kcepenney

No, it was all done. BC was "dry" and when I moved it there was all these cracks like where the cake moved when I moved it. Does that make sense?




I'm trying to understand. icon_confused.gif Can you post a picture that shows what you're talking about?

dalis4joe Posted 16 May 2010 , 1:07am
post #10 of 18

I also use foam core boards and they are very sturdy....

hth

Loucinda Posted 16 May 2010 , 1:08am
post #11 of 18

I had something happen today that I never had happen before concerning "cracking". I had a 12" cake that was the 2nd tier of 4. I always let my cakes settle overnight before finishing them. I had finished this cake, and had put the final icing on it. It was on 3/8 foamcore. As I picked it up to move it to set it on the 14" layer, it cracked along the sides.....about an inch to inch and a half from the bottom edge of the cake...but not all the way around it. It was very odd. The cracks were hortizontal NOT vertical. And yes, it was crusting buttercream. I was able to patch it and use it, but was wondering why in the world it did what it did? Any ideas?

BlakesCakes Posted 16 May 2010 , 1:11am
post #12 of 18

Hi, Cindy.
Any chance that the cake was torted at about that level? I could see this happening if the dam broke or the torted layers slipped a bit???

Just a thought.
Rae

kcepenney Posted 16 May 2010 , 1:15am
post #13 of 18

Well I must take all my photos before I move my cake!! LOL!!! I can't find one and the one I have now, in the photo you can't tell. Yes....crusting BC and cracking....does that make sense??? I was just using a wax cardboard support. So.....I should be using something more sturdy??? It has no filling....it is just a 1/2 sheet cake, 3" cake.

kakeladi Posted 16 May 2010 , 1:26am
post #14 of 18

..........using a wax cardboard support. So.....I should be using something more sturdy...........

Basically yes icon_smile.gif
You don't tell us what size this cake is. If it is a sheet cake &/or certian flavors like carrot - especailly the bigger ones - they need at least 2 boards glued together to support it.
Were the cracks *just in the icing* or did the cake crack also?
Usually if there is not enough support it's the b'cream that crack into very fine lines. If the cake crack it is a big ol' open crack icon_sad.gif

BlakesCakes Posted 16 May 2010 , 1:26am
post #15 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by kcepenney

I was just using a wax cardboard support. So.....I should be using something more sturdy???




Yes. A single cardboard just isn't strong enough.

Rae

kcepenney Posted 16 May 2010 , 1:38am
post #16 of 18

Yes it is just the frosting cracking...not the actual cake. Well I am glad I asked. All this time and I should have been using something more sturdy!! This is why I love this website!!!!
Thanks All!!!

kcepenney Posted 16 May 2010 , 2:09am
post #17 of 18

Yes it is just the frosting cracking...not the actual cake. Well I am glad I asked. All this time and I should have been using something more sturdy!! This is why I love this website!!!!
Thanks All!!!

mamawrobin Posted 16 May 2010 , 3:15am
post #18 of 18

When I use cardboard cakeboards I always tape 3 or more of them together. That way I'm certain that my cakes are secure. I figured this was your problem.

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