Should I Refrigerate This Cake?

Decorating By MistyGirl2008 Updated 18 May 2010 , 1:59am by Creative_chika

MistyGirl2008 Posted 15 May 2010 , 6:30pm
post #1 of 20

I never refrigerate my fondant covered cakes but I'm making one today that will have freshly sliced strawberries in the middle. Aside from the fruit the other fillings are non-perishable (just using buttercream). We will eat the cake tomorrow so it will only be sitting out for 18 hours or so.

So should I refrigerate because of the strawberries or will the fondant keep them fresh inside? I'm scared of what my fridge will do to my fondant.

Thanks!

19 replies
jewelzbakescakes Posted 15 May 2010 , 8:00pm
post #2 of 20

I made a bridal shower cake with choc fondant and choc ganache last night and the ganache was getting soft under the fondant and the girl I made it for had to drive 3 hours with it today, so I decided to put it in the refrigerator overnight to harden the ganache and it was fine. I think the key is to not touch the fondant after it comes out of the fridge.
I also put the Mario cake in my photo gallery in the fridge overnight, it was fine.

itsacake Posted 15 May 2010 , 8:25pm
post #3 of 20

The ONLY cake disaster I ever had was a fresh raspberry filling that fermented sitting out. Totally cured me of fresh fruit fillings unless it is a cake I can refrigerate.

I'd chance the fondant in the refrigerator. Put the cake in a box and don't open the box until it is at room temperature. That way most of the condensation will happen on the box instead of on the cake.

Sliced strawberries can also weep if you don't refrigerate the cake. I know lots of people do it, but in my opinion, fresh fruit and fondant are not a happy marriage.

mamawrobin Posted 15 May 2010 , 8:35pm
post #4 of 20

I would. I don't refrigerate my cakes and that's why I never use fresh fruit in mine. I did once...never again. I just serve it along with my cake but not in it. I agree fondant and fresh fruit isn't a "happy marriage."

momma28 Posted 15 May 2010 , 8:51pm
post #5 of 20

I refrigerate every cake, fondant or buttercream, hand painted or not.....as long as you leave it alone when you take it out it will be fine. Make sure your room isnt super humid.

This is one of those questions that gets asked so often and everyone has a different opinion. I use fresh, perishable buttercreams and fillings. Refrigeration a must.

itsacake Posted 15 May 2010 , 9:01pm
post #6 of 20

Perishable buttercream?

MistyGirl2008 Posted 15 May 2010 , 11:09pm
post #7 of 20

Thank you everyone! I'm thinking I might skip the strawberries icon_smile.gif A strawberry jam and almond buttercream filling is sounder better by the minute and this is for my daughter (I don't bake for customers) so I can pretty much do what I want...lol.

momma28 Posted 15 May 2010 , 11:54pm
post #8 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by itsacake

Perishable buttercream?




Swiss meringue buttercream is perishable

itsacake Posted 16 May 2010 , 1:59am
post #9 of 20

Well, I usually refrigerate it when I make it and since it is the only buttercream I am currently using, I make it frequently, but that being said, we made vast batches and kept it on our workbench shelves for days and days and days at school and used as needed.

The chefs all said it was useless to refrigerate it as it needed to be room temperature to use and it takes too long to get warm. Apparently most professional kitchens do not chill it, so I haven't worried if it is out for a day or two.

I suppose the health department might agree with you. I'll have to ask.

MCurry Posted 16 May 2010 , 2:06am
post #10 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by momma28

I refrigerate every cake, fondant or buttercream, hand painted or not.....as long as you leave it alone when you take it out it will be fine. Make sure your room isnt super humid.

This is one of those questions that gets asked so often and everyone has a different opinion. I use fresh, perishable buttercreams and fillings. Refrigeration a must.




I agree with Momma28 and refrigerate every cake as well. It has not impacted my fondant when coming to room temp either. I use Satin Ice.

Creative_chika Posted 16 May 2010 , 2:15am
post #11 of 20

If you refrigerate, do you cover it in the refrigerator?

momma28 Posted 16 May 2010 , 12:13pm
post #12 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by itsacake

Well, I usually refrigerate it when I make it and since it is the only buttercream I am currently using, I make it frequently, but that being said, we made vast batches and kept it on our workbench shelves for days and days and days at school and used as needed.

The chefs all said it was useless to refrigerate it as it needed to be room temperature to use and it takes too long to get warm. Apparently most professional kitchens do not chill it, so I haven't worried if it is out for a day or two.

I suppose the health department might agree with you. I'll have to ask.




My health department would shut me down. I had to specify refrigeration to get the recipe approved for use

itsacake Posted 16 May 2010 , 3:28pm
post #13 of 20

Interesting

MCurry Posted 17 May 2010 , 10:35am
post #14 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Creative_chika

If you refrigerate, do you cover it in the refrigerator?




Most of the time no since it is usually uncovered for 24 hours or less. When I do, I loosely wrap plastic wrap around the cake. So far so good.

Once over the past 5 years, I had one cake (used chocolate satin ice) that began to sweat when coming to room temperature and made the brown look like patent leather. Happy baking!

NikkiB912 Posted 17 May 2010 , 10:52am
post #15 of 20

It's always good to hear refrigeration advice! I am new-ish to cake decorating and do it as a hobby or for friends who need cakes. I am making a cake for my friend's daughter's birthday this upcoming weekend and can't decide if I'll do just BC with fondant decorations or fondant covered with fondant decorations. We live in a humid climate (Okinawa, Japan) and it's been raining a lot lately. I know the fondant might sweat but I don't want the buttercream to melt. I end up refrigerating every cake or not icing/decorating it until the last minute (which stresses me out)...I can't leave cakes out because I have cats and nowhere to close off the cake besides the fridge! I was hoping to make her cake a day ahead and refrigerate it so I'm not rushing at the last minute! I've always had issues with my fondant sweating when I refrigerate it though.

MCurry Posted 17 May 2010 , 11:16am
post #16 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by NikkiB912

It's always good to hear refrigeration advice! I am new-ish to cake decorating and do it as a hobby or for friends who need cakes. I am making a cake for my friend's daughter's birthday this upcoming weekend and can't decide if I'll do just BC with fondant decorations or fondant covered with fondant decorations. We live in a humid climate (Okinawa, Japan) and it's been raining a lot lately. I know the fondant might sweat but I don't want the buttercream to melt. I end up refrigerating every cake or not icing/decorating it until the last minute (which stresses me out)...I can't leave cakes out because I have cats and nowhere to close off the cake besides the fridge! I was hoping to make her cake a day ahead and refrigerate it so I'm not rushing at the last minute! I've always had issues with my fondant sweating when I refrigerate it though.




In culinary school they had us wrap the cake in plastic. The plastic needed to touch the fondant. We took them out with plastic on and let them come to room temperature - result no sweating.

If you are having multiple sweating issues, it may be the humidity level of the fridge. Therefore, an option for you may be to use silica gel packets; I learned this recently. Some cake decorators put them in the cake box (not on the actual cake) to control sweating and humidity issues.

Hope this helps!

NikkiB912 Posted 17 May 2010 , 11:23am
post #17 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by MCurry



In culinary school they had us wrap the cake in plastic. The plastic needed to touch the fondant. We took them out with plastic on and let them come to room temperature - result no sweating.

If you are having multiple sweating issues, it may be the humidity level of the fridge. Therefore, an option for you may be to use silica gel packets; I learned this recently. Some cake decorators put them in the cake box (not on the actual cake) to control sweating and humidity issues.

Hope this helps!




Ah - good idea! Okinawa is so damn humid. We're moving to New Mexico soon so it'll be hot but at least dry! I'm sure she'll love the cake with or without sweat lol. Maybe I'll refrigerate it and then when I deliver it (and attend the party) I'll just have her sit it on her counter to come to room temperature.

mamawrobin Posted 17 May 2010 , 12:04pm
post #18 of 20

It's extrmemly humid here in Arkansas as well. Edna (design me a cake) posted yesterday that she NEVER refrigerates her cakes because of humidity. (She's in Florida.) If humidity is an issue for you refrigerating your cakes will only make things worse.

NikkiB912 Posted 17 May 2010 , 12:12pm
post #19 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by mamawrobin

It's extrmemly humid here in Arkansas as well. Edna (design me a cake) posted yesterday that she NEVER refrigerates her cakes because of humidity. (She's in Florida.) If humidity is an issue for you refrigerating your cakes will only make things worse.




I know I don't have to refrigerate it but I don't really have anywhere to put it (besides the fridge) that my cats can't get to it. We don't put them in a room at night or anything and they're buttheads so I know they'd get on the counter (one of my cats has a powdered sugar addiction). Maybe I will just frost/decorate it the day of so I don't have to worry about refrigerating it.

Creative_chika Posted 18 May 2010 , 1:59am
post #20 of 20

Thanks Girls!

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