Pock Problems With Mmf - Help Please?

Decorating By ycknits Updated 21 Jun 2010 , 8:01pm by ycknits

ycknits Posted 13 May 2010 , 5:18pm
post #1 of 19

I made my first batch of MMF using Designmeacake.com recipe. It tastes great and was nice to handle when covering a square cake. My problem is that I got lots of little pock marks on the bottom (unrolled) side of the fondant. Some of them disappeared when I smoothed the cake, but many did not. It really spoils the look of my cake. Any suggestions on how to eliminate/avoid the pock marks would be much appreciated! Thank you :>)

18 replies
KHalstead Posted 13 May 2010 , 6:28pm
post #2 of 19

I know exactly what you mean, I got them all over this cake right here!!!


I think it's because the powdered sugar clumps and it needs to be sifted REALLY well!!
LL

Cookncakes Posted 13 May 2010 , 6:51pm
post #3 of 19

Did you happen to spray your mat with a spray shortening spray? I've had that happen when I've done that and there are little bubbles in the spray.

ycknits Posted 14 May 2010 , 5:53pm
post #4 of 19

Thanks for your thoughts on this. When I examined the marks, there was no evidence of powdered sugar... so I dismissed the clumping idea, which was my first fear. I greased the mat with Crisco - so shouldn't have been any outgassing. I'm wondering if I should have rolled and then re-rolled. Has anyone done that?

LilaLoa Posted 14 May 2010 , 6:08pm
post #5 of 19

I have no idea WHY it happens, but here's what I do. I have 2 rolling mats. I roll my fondant onto one of them. I smooth the rolled side. I put my second mat on top and flip the fondant over. I peel off the original mat. (This is the side that typically has the pock marks) Then, I flip it all over on top of the cake and take off the second mat. This way I end up with the "rolled" side up and NO pock marks. Plus....its way easier to cover large cakes this way!

SugarFiend Posted 14 May 2010 , 6:13pm
post #6 of 19

I have this problem too, but I usually use Satin Ice - and I usually grease my silicone mat with a little Crisco. I've never been able to just flip the mat onto my cakes because of the pock marks on the mat side for that very reason.

I wonder if it's a combination of the silicone mat and too much Crisco or something...?

Spectra Posted 14 May 2010 , 9:47pm
post #7 of 19

I have the same problem. I just roll the fondant on my roller, like pie crust, and roll it onto the cake so the underneath side is touching the cake.

ycknits Posted 15 May 2010 , 12:42pm
post #8 of 19

Great idea, Spectra. Thank you!

de_montsoreau Posted 15 May 2010 , 2:44pm
post #9 of 19

Yep, this happens when you grease your surface with shortening. I usually use very fine corn starch whcih works like a dream. Unless I specifically want that effect - I think it looks a bit like leather. I then paint the fondant with a mixture of wodka and the fondant color to make it shiny. I like that effect.

ycknits Posted 16 May 2010 , 3:46am
post #10 of 19

Do you use a specific corn starch that is very fine? or do you sift regular cornstarch? Thank you so much for your help!

artsycakes14 Posted 16 May 2010 , 4:05am
post #11 of 19

I used to have this happen, then I found that if you keep kneading and kneading and kneading it eventually goes away and turns super smooth. This also works with powdered sugar clumps... knead and knead and knead and knead etc. It all smooth out icon_smile.gif Good luck thumbs_up.gif

BeanCountingBaker Posted 16 May 2010 , 4:07am
post #12 of 19

I had fantastic success with my last fondant work by rolling it on parchment paper. I used only a tiny sprinkle of powdered sugar and it worked like a charm.

ycknits Posted 16 May 2010 , 12:21pm
post #13 of 19

Thank you to all of you! I will knead it into submission and then roll out on parchment paper with a light dusting of powdered sugar/cornstarch mixture. Stay tuned for a followup icon_smile.gif report :>)

ycknits Posted 21 Jun 2010 , 2:45pm
post #14 of 19

Just a quick followup report - I'm now rolling my fondant on my wooden chopping block counter, using lots of powdered sugar underneath the fondant and just enough on the top to keep it from sticking to my new marble rolling pin. This has been working great for me. I bought Jennifer Dontz's training videa and it changed the way that I do just about everything.... She is an awesome teacher and so skilled. I now crumb coat my cake, roll and cover my fondant, ice my cake with buttercream, and then cover with the fondant. Reducing my process to a repetitive sequence has been critical for me. Goodbye pock marks!

Thank you to all of you for your help and suggestions - you are amazing!!

Win Posted 21 Jun 2010 , 3:01pm
post #15 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by ycknits

I made my first batch of MMF using Designmeacake.com recipe. It tastes great and was nice to handle when covering a square cake. My problem is that I got lots of little pock marks on the bottom (unrolled) side of the fondant. Some of them disappeared when I smoothed the cake, but many did not. It really spoils the look of my cake. Any suggestions on how to eliminate/avoid the pock marks would be much appreciated! Thank you :>)




So are you saying you flip your fondant onto your cake? I don't think you will ever be fully satisfied with the results of your surface if you continue to "flip." The best method is to either use a straight rolling pin or french pastry rolling pin and roll the fondant over that much as you would roll pie crust onto a pin. The difference here is that it tends to stick to itself so as you roll it, lightly dust it with powdered sugar. Then, go to the far side of you cake and roll it backwards onto the surface. You can either dust off or steam your cake later to remove all traces of powdered sugar.

I think you will be far happier with your results that way. No matter how hard one tries, the underside of a rolled surface will never be as smooth as the top side.

ycknits Posted 21 Jun 2010 , 5:46pm
post #16 of 19

Nope, I no longer flip my fondant. I use Jennifer Dontz's method of carefully sliding the rolled fondant sheet onto both of my arms and then carefully lifting over the cake.... rolled side up. Jennifer's video changed my approach entirely and now I have no problems..... except for not being able to get a perfectly bottom edge on my small tiers... 6" for example. I just posted a new topic posting on that subject. Thanks for your interest and help!

sweet_honesty Posted 21 Jun 2010 , 6:02pm
post #17 of 19

I also lift my fondant onto my cakes with my arms. Just wash your arms up to the elbows...(idiot that I am I like to pretend that I'm a surgeon and this is a life saving op. Might as well be cuz my heart beats so fast every time I cover a cake). Slide your arms under and lay your fondant over the cake. Works like a charm.

Win Posted 21 Jun 2010 , 7:25pm
post #18 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by ycknits

Nope, I no longer flip my fondant. I use Jennifer Dontz's method of carefully sliding the rolled fondant sheet onto both of my arms and then carefully lifting over the cake.... rolled side up. Jennifer's video changed my approach entirely and now I have no problems..... except for not being able to get a perfectly bottom edge on my small tiers... 6" for example. I just posted a new topic posting on that subject. Thanks for your interest and help!




Sorry, I posted an answer before I read your update, but commented on your 6" dilemma as well. The only thing I don't like about lifting with both arms is the risk of stray hairs getting into the fondant. I like the fact that when I roll the fondant over my rolling pin, I can see if any stray fibers got caught in it. I must say; however, I see all kinds of people do it that way and have to laugh especially hard when I see hairy-armed men doing it. icon_lol.gif Rather grosses me out when Danny on Cake Boss is seen using that method.

ycknits Posted 21 Jun 2010 , 8:01pm
post #19 of 19

Oh, heavens.... I never thought about arm hair. Gross! Fortunately, I don't have much, but I will probably give my arms an extra 'brushing' with a terry towel when I wash :>)

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