Foil Cake Drum Verses Masonite Cake Boards?

Decorating By meri1028 Updated 12 May 2010 , 7:46pm by meri1028

meri1028 Posted 12 May 2010 , 3:31pm
post #1 of 16

I'm going to be doing a three tiered wedding cake - 6, 10, 14" tiers. I'm wondering if a foil cake drum is enough for three tiers. I think so, but don't want to risk any disasters in transportation. How do all of you decide whether to use a cake drum or cake board?

Thanks in advanced!!

15 replies
CBMom Posted 12 May 2010 , 5:23pm
post #2 of 16

Are you transporting the tiers separately, then assembling once you get there?

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meri1028 Posted 12 May 2010 , 5:30pm
post #3 of 16

I was planning to do Edna's doweling technique & stack before I travel since it's only three tiers. It's only about 25 miles to the reception site.

jammjenks Posted 12 May 2010 , 5:32pm
post #4 of 16

I'd go with masonite or 1/2 inch plywood.

Just my preference. The foil drum would work, many use them for this size cake, but I'd go with stronger if I could. Just makes me feel better. icon_smile.gif

Kitagrl Posted 12 May 2010 , 5:34pm
post #5 of 16

I have two three-tiered cakes in my recent photos and used cake drums for both of them. One of them traveled over 2 hours to the destination! That one I double doweled...the white celtic heart wedding cake I just took 30 minutes and I did not dowel it at all..just of course, supports inside (bubble tea straws).

I would probably use a wooden board for four tiers and on up. I don't like the thin masonite ones though, I prefer the thicker nova wood ones.

meri1028 Posted 12 May 2010 , 5:35pm
post #6 of 16

jammjenks, you're right. If I'm sticking one long dowel down the cake (other than the dowels on each layer), this wont go through the masonite board. So how do I get the cake to stay on the board, other than royal icing? Do you stick it onto the board somehow? With the foil drum I usually hammer the dowel all the way into that.

Jeep_girl816 Posted 12 May 2010 , 5:36pm
post #7 of 16

I just feel better safe than sorry. Plywood/masonite isn't expensive and you'd feel horrible if the cake drum failed and buckled or something. Nothing's worse than having a disaster and knowing you could have prevented it.

Kitagrl Posted 12 May 2010 , 5:44pm
post #8 of 16

Actually the nice thing about the cake drums are, though, is that you can drive a dowel all the way through and down into the drum...with the wooden ones, you can't.

Either one will work fine for a three tiered so whatever makes you feel safest!

meri1028 Posted 12 May 2010 , 5:50pm
post #9 of 16

Also, would anyone recommend using the SPS system on a three tiered cake? I've never used them before. It looks like you cant stick one long dowel down the middle and you can't stack them before you travel.

jammjenks Posted 12 May 2010 , 6:07pm
post #10 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by meri1028

jammjenks, you're right. If I'm sticking one long dowel down the cake (other than the dowels on each layer), this wont go through the masonite board. So how do I get the cake to stay on the board, other than royal icing? Do you stick it onto the board somehow? With the foil drum I usually hammer the dowel all the way into that.




Once the bottom board is covered (I use freezer paper most of the time), I use hot glue to adhere a cake cardboard that is the same size as the bottom tier. Then the cake on it will not slide.

I do not do a center dowel through any cake. I have in the past, but no longer see the need. I do refrigerate stacked cakes prior to travel if possible. They travel better that way.

cas17 Posted 12 May 2010 , 6:32pm
post #11 of 16

i use a covered 1/2 foam core board for the base with a smaller one underneath that so i can get my fingers under the base and it's super strong and i have a full inch of base to hammer my center dowel into. i do not, however, ever travel with more than 2 tiers stacked as i simply cannot lift and carry more than that (unless it is something small like 5/7 or 6/8 or 7/11 at the most).

meri1028 Posted 12 May 2010 , 6:53pm
post #12 of 16

thanks everyone! I may just use both! - plywood or foam core under a cake drum. Just to be safe!

As far as stacking them, I have this fear I would mess something up if I stacked them on site. cas17, I agree with you they're gonna be pretty heavy. I think I would freak out if I messed something up stacking it on site. I would rather freak out at home if I did that. Does anyone have any tips if I decide to stack at least the top layer at the reception?

Jeep_girl816 Posted 12 May 2010 , 7:17pm
post #13 of 16

I recommend sps, you don't need a center dowel, it's completely secure with out it.

cas17 Posted 12 May 2010 , 7:25pm
post #14 of 16

i just take the top tier in it's own box and use a very large sturdy spatula/hamburger flipper to lift it and place it very carefully. of course, i always bring my emergency kit, extra icing in a piping bag, small palate knife, a piece of viva, and such to smooth any finger marks that may occur. then pipe the border. one time i had to bring my fondant ribbon border rolled up to apply onsite but it went very well. the only problem i had was the last cake i delivered was up on a ledge in an alcove at the venue and i was barely able to reach placing the top tier. so i may carry a stepping stool with me next time as i do not trust those folding white wooden chairs to stand on. hope all goes well for you!! icon_smile.gif

leah_s Posted 12 May 2010 , 7:34pm
post #15 of 16

I use drums for everything. Used one last weekend for a cake that served 300.

Been doing that for years.

Geez, what do I have to do to get you folks to give up the center dowel thing? ::bangs head against wall::

meri1028 Posted 12 May 2010 , 7:46pm
post #16 of 16

cas17, thank you!! I think you've convinced me to put the top tier on at the reception.

leah_s, how do you handle your support and transportation of your cakes? What did you do for the one that served 300? Did you stack it there?

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