Baking Large O.d. Cakes

Decorating By Spills Updated 20 May 2010 , 5:15am by Loucinda

Spills Posted 11 May 2010 , 5:03pm
post #1 of 20

Hello fellow CC'ers!

I'm going to be baking my first 16" rounds next week for a wedding. I guess I didn't really realize just how big it actually was until I got it... Really lucky it just fits in my oven icon_redface.gif

I've read on here that some people use flower nails to bake with, and perhaps even bake-even strips as well. I believe I only have two flower nails - would this suffice?

Thanks so much for your help in advance...already started dreaming about making this cake next week icon_cry.gif

19 replies
jammjenks Posted 11 May 2010 , 5:18pm
post #2 of 20

I just baked four 16" layers last weekend. I used two flower nails in each layer and no bake even strips. I used the WASC recipe and baked at 325 for 1 hour. HTH

dmo4ab Posted 11 May 2010 , 5:44pm
post #3 of 20

I think I used four flower nails and the bake even strips, but my oven bakes slow.
I might also suggest lining at least the bottom with waxed paper. The first two 16" layers I baked stuck to the pan even though it was well greased and floured. I was in a panic until my Mom bailed me out with the waxed paper lining tip!

indydebi Posted 11 May 2010 , 6:00pm
post #4 of 20

I use baking strips, no flower nails, and grease-only-no-flour my pans. Reduce oven temp. (I even had a 14x22 sheet pan that I never used nails in.)

I know many use wax paper successfully as a liner, but I accidentally used wax paper instead of parchment paper when baking cookies and the wax from the paper melted onto the cookies. Had to throw the whole batch out. It may be different for cakes, I don't know, but test it first to see how it works for you.

Megabot Posted 11 May 2010 , 6:36pm
post #5 of 20

What do you use at grease Indydebi? I usually used butter with flour but often still have some problems, especially with the bigger cakes. Thanks!

indydebi Posted 11 May 2010 , 6:42pm
post #6 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Megabot

What do you use at grease Indydebi? I usually used butter with flour but often still have some problems, especially with the bigger cakes. Thanks!


I remember as a kid, an older lady told me never to grease the pan with butter because butter will "fry" the cake when it's baking.

My first choice is the CK product "Pan Grease" ( http://countrykitchensa.com/catalog/product.aspx?productId=619045 ) . If I'm out of that, I just use plain 'ole crisco, (which is what I used for years anyway before I discovered the Pan Grease).

Whatever you use, don't be stingy with it. Coat the pan well.

jenng1482 Posted 11 May 2010 , 6:55pm
post #7 of 20

Many people (including me) will recommend home made "pan grease". I have never had a cake stick. Its equal parts crisco, oil, and flour. Blend it together, store in fridge or contertop, and brush on with a pastry brush.

leah_s Posted 11 May 2010 , 7:39pm
post #8 of 20

wax paper only works for cakes, where the entire surface of the waxed paper is covered by the batter. It won't work to line your pan with for cookies.

indydebi Posted 11 May 2010 , 7:41pm
post #9 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by leah_s

wax paper only works for cakes, where the entire surface of the waxed paper is covered by the batter. It won't work to line your pan with for cookies.


Thanks for the explanation! thumbs_up.gif

Spills Posted 11 May 2010 , 8:10pm
post #10 of 20

Thank you. I think I'll try out the wax paper and the two flower nails for the first one and see what I get. Hopefully I won't have any more nightmares about this cake considering I still have a week to go!!

KHalstead Posted 11 May 2010 , 8:24pm
post #11 of 20

I love using wax paper in the bottom, especially with bigger cakes......after making up 3 or 4 batches of batter to fill a pan, the last thing you want is to have a huge CHUNK of it remain IN the pan when you turn it out!!!!

Spills Posted 19 May 2010 , 11:28pm
post #12 of 20

Okay, it's baking time! And I'm confused as to how to use the wax paper... Do I put the wax paper on the bottom FIRST, then apply my no-stick; or do I apply the no-stick THEN the wax paper????

Please help if you can.
Thanks a million!

Spills Posted 20 May 2010 , 12:12am
post #13 of 20

Nothing hey...

Well, I tried putting on some no-stick, then the wax paper, then some more no-stick on the wax paper; poured my batter in; placed the two flower nails and popped it into the oven at 325.

icon_eek.gif OH NO...my oven rack has a curve in it at the back and the cake pan (16" round) doesn't go in my oven flat!!!! icon_mad.gif I put a small cookie sheet under the one side of the cake pan to level it off - I'm HOPING this will be okay.

Anyone come across this issue when baking the larger cakes? (I have a regular household sized oven...) A little worried...not gonna lie... icon_redface.gif

Spills Posted 20 May 2010 , 1:29am
post #14 of 20

Well crap.

Sooo... icon_cry.gif I had too much batter in the pan apparently (especially at a slight angle...) and it overflowed. I corrected it with some foil and luckily it looks like the cake turned out okay after 74min of baking... Note to self - 16" round does not require 3 complete cake mixes... Oh man....

I think I'll leave the other 16" for tomorrow and save myself some grief. The easy 8" and 12" I'll finish.

Really wish someone could answer that wax paper question though........ icon_rolleyes.gif

aobodessa Posted 20 May 2010 , 1:54am
post #15 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spills

Well crap.

Sooo... icon_cry.gif I had too much batter in the pan apparently (especially at a slight angle...) and it overflowed. I corrected it with some foil and luckily it looks like the cake turned out okay after 74min of baking... Note to self - 16" round does not require 3 complete cake mixes... Oh man....

I think I'll leave the other 16" for tomorrow and save myself some grief. The easy 8" and 12" I'll finish.

Really wish someone could answer that wax paper question though........ icon_rolleyes.gif




Spills, I can sympathise with your nearly-too-big-for-the-oven pan situation. Here's what I've done in my home oven: see if you can turn your oven racks upside down ... the "curve" or "angle" at the back of the shelf will then be pointing down, which should fix your problem. Failing that, try using some shims (or even a brick) wrapped in foil to raise the cake pan up so it is level and will be able to avoid the angle problem.

Also, my recommendation for the pans spray/ wax paper problem: spritz a little pan spray in the bottom of your pan, then line with parchment (I prefer it to wax paper). After that, spray the pan with your non-stick, but in your flower nails and fill.

If you want to use more cake batter, I line the sides with parchment also, making sure it extends straight up over the edge, sometimes by an inch or more, also making sure to overlap the pieces of parchment so nothing oozes out during baking. After the cake comes out of the oven, you can trim it before flipping it out.

I hope this helps you have a more successful baking session with your big pan.

Odessa

casme Posted 20 May 2010 , 2:07am
post #16 of 20

aobodessa, great tip, never thought to turn my oven rack over for 16" pan. Thanks.

Spills Posted 20 May 2010 , 2:29am
post #17 of 20

Thanks Odessa,

Glad someone could help out a bit...

I tried turning the racks upside down, it's a no-go... But for my other 16" round I just put a larger cookie sheet (upside down - bottom to bottom) under the cake and it seems to be going well.

I never think to raise my edges...that'd sure keep the base of my oven clean icon_lol.gif and probably make my cakes more close to 2" high each.

One quick question with the nails again - if the top of the cake isn't completely level, how do you level it with the ends of the nails sticking out. I just about ruined my first 16" by flipping it over to get the nails out and flipping it back over to level it...

aobodessa Posted 20 May 2010 , 2:53am
post #18 of 20

Spills,

What I do is level it in the pan, using the top edge of the pan as my guide. You only run your knife up to the nail "stems", and lift off the excess. I always put my "cake tops" into a big bowl so my family has them to nibble on and won't bother my cakes. The girls all learned young that if you want cake, take from the bowl, NOT from the baked cakes!

I will pull out the parchment side pieces first (carefully running a butter knife around the edge between the parchment and the cake first, if necessary), then trim the top edge.

When I flip my cake out, I do it onto a sheet of plastic wrap, then wrap it up right away, to hold in the moisture. This technique was something I found in a book by Scott Clark Wooley and Michael Farace. For these huge tiers, I will freeze one layer, so that when I place it on the bottom tier, it is easily handled. The bottom layer is fresh, I add whatever filling to the top, then place the frozen layer on top of that. Wrap the sides and top with plastic wrap until the top layer thaws, then frost as usual.

I hope that you will be able to use these tips to your advantage.

Odessa

aobodessa Posted 20 May 2010 , 2:54am
post #19 of 20

Spills,

What I do is level it in the pan, using the top edge of the pan as my guide. You only run your knife up to the nail "stems", and lift off the excess. I always put my "cake tops" into a big bowl so my family has them to nibble on and won't bother my cakes. The girls all learned young that if you want cake, take from the bowl, NOT from the baked cakes!

I will pull out the parchment side pieces first (carefully running a butter knife around the edge between the parchment and the cake first, if necessary), then trim the top edge.

When I flip my cake out, I do it onto a sheet of plastic wrap, then wrap it up right away, to hold in the moisture. This technique was something I found in a book by Scott Clark Wooley and Michael Farace. For these huge tiers, I will freeze one layer, so that when I place it on the bottom tier, it is easily handled. The bottom layer is fresh, I add whatever filling to the top, then place the frozen layer on top of that. Wrap the sides and top with plastic wrap until the top layer thaws, then frost as usual.

I hope that you will be able to use these tips to your advantage.

Odessa

Loucinda Posted 20 May 2010 , 5:15am
post #20 of 20

Use a large length of floss to level the cake, it will go right around the flower nail. Hold it tight and just take it across the cake from one edge of the pan to the other.....hope that makes sense.

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