Canned Fruit Between Layers? How Do I?

Decorating By caramelchef Updated 9 May 2010 , 11:06pm by CakesByAdriana

caramelchef Posted 9 May 2010 , 2:13am
post #1 of 15

I really need some advice on how to do this, the customer wants a cake filled with canned fruit but no buttercream or whipped cream or mousse or ganache.
The cake is to be covered in fondant and i am afraid the weight of the cake and fondant will cause the fruit to slip out the sides.
She doesn't want anything besides these fruit and some jam between the layers, now i know that i will have to apply some apricot jam for the fondant to adhere to it but what do i do about the fruit. HELP!!!

And the worst part is its a carved cake!! icon_cry.gif

14 replies
tmgarcia_98 Posted 9 May 2010 , 2:38am
post #2 of 15

I personally would not do it without a buttercream dam around the edge of the cake. This would stop the filling from squishing out the sides. I also would apply a thin coat of buttercream instead of jam under the fondant.

Sometimes you just have to tell a customer that certain things just won't work.

madgeowens Posted 9 May 2010 , 3:01am
post #3 of 15

I think the fruit wetness may melt the fondant as well...I would never do it without a dam of bc and a thin coat as well next to fondant

caramelchef Posted 9 May 2010 , 3:20am
post #4 of 15

First she wanted sliced strawberries then she called and changed it to fruit cocktail. I gave her all the choices of fillings that i could use to dam but nothing. So on Monday i will suggest, no fruit filling, no torting just one layer iced with a thin layer of jam then covered with fondant, if she doesnt want that then there is nothing more i can do to help

7yyrt Posted 9 May 2010 , 3:46am
post #5 of 15

Well, my thought is it will slip. You might tell her so.
You can put fruit between flat layers like the recipe below, but a carved cake... I wouldn't trust it.
Couldn't she put the fruit on each slice when serving?
http://www.countryliving.com/recipefinder/chambord-layer-cake-recipe-3841?click=main_sr

bmoser24 Posted 9 May 2010 , 5:30am
post #6 of 15

there was a thread about using ganashe to crumb coat, then fondant(no buttercream needed)...real interesting.
In using this method he mentions many benifits, one being he didn't need a dam for filling. The ganashe hardens enough that it wont slip.
Another benefit i liked was that the fondant was smooooth, and sharp edges.
I havn't tried yet, but will soon. Thats how they do it in Aulstaila...i'll look for the thread.
HTH

madgeowens Posted 9 May 2010 , 6:01am
post #7 of 15

Yes I say it would slip also, but won't it also melt the fondant?

bmoser24 Posted 9 May 2010 , 6:23am
post #8 of 15

here is an intersting link....http://cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-633264-.html, about ganash instead of buttercream

bmoser24 Posted 9 May 2010 , 6:27am
post #9 of 15

it says no dams.... kinda long, but worth it!

mamawrobin Posted 9 May 2010 , 7:24am
post #10 of 15

I don't use fruit or pudding as a filling in a carved cake. No way. No how.

Nacnacweazel Posted 9 May 2010 , 9:21am
post #11 of 15

Some people just don't have a clue, and never will, about food physics. I think that there are some people that just try to come up with something "new and cool," but don't understand some realities. I had a bride INSIST that I make her wedding cake that would be "perfect" for her ceremony and flat out refused to listen to anything against how "perfect" it was. She wanted a "light" cake because of the venue. She insisted that angel food cake, filled with chocolate moose and iced with whipped cream was going to be "perfect" for her OUTDOOR JUNE WEDDING IN LAS VEGAS!!! She tells me the reasoning behind it is, "It's going to be really hot, so the cake has to be very light and cool so it doesn't weigh everyone down when they eat it." Needless to say, she is STILL trying to find someone stupid enough to make this cake for her. icon_razz.gif

artscallion Posted 9 May 2010 , 11:58am
post #12 of 15

If somebody asked a carpenter to build their house using toothpicks instead of nails, my guess is the carpenter would just tell them that option isn't on the menu.

caramelchef Posted 9 May 2010 , 10:09pm
post #13 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by bmoser24

there was a thread about using ganashe to crumb coat, then fondant(no buttercream needed)...real interesting.
In using this method he mentions many benifits, one being he didn't need a dam for filling. The ganashe hardens enough that it wont slip.
Another benefit i liked was that the fondant was smooooth, and sharp edges.
I havn't tried yet, but will soon. Thats how they do it in Aulstaila...i'll look for the thread.
HTH




They don't want ganache either. So i am going to suggest forgetting the fruit and just coating in jam and covering with the fondant.

JohnnyCakes1966 Posted 9 May 2010 , 10:39pm
post #14 of 15

YOU are the expert! She doesn't understand what it takes to make a cake structurally sound. And in the end, if you give her the cake she wants and the layers slide or fruit filling comes oozing out the sides, YOU will be blamed. Period. My advice: tell her it can't be done or tell her to find another decorator. Save the headache and protect your professional reputation.

CakesByAdriana Posted 9 May 2010 , 11:06pm
post #15 of 15

I once put canned peaches with Dulce de Leche in a cake. It wasn't carved but 2 tiers.
I dried the peaches to absorb the sugar but they still let out juice. I did a crumb coat and kept it chilled, the buttercream held .... sort of but towards the end you could see the fondant starting to buble. I won't be doing that again .
If I were you ...I wouldn't do it. I agree with JonnyCakes1966.
Save yourself the headache and your reputation. Some people don't understand.
Good Luck1

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%