Back Pain!

Decorating By ChoueiriCakeCo Updated 8 May 2010 , 4:07am by bakermom3107

ChoueiriCakeCo Posted 7 May 2010 , 2:58am
post #1 of 13

How do you all deal with back pains from decorating for hours?? It's becoming a problem for me, and I usually sit while I work, but I've been having pain that lasts all day. I've never had back problems before, and I don't want this to turn into a bigger problem icon_redface.gif

12 replies
Normita Posted 7 May 2010 , 3:12am
post #2 of 13

I am wondering that too!! My back usually hurts when I have been working on a cake for a while. I usually just take a nice warm bath with some soaking bath salts to ease my aching muscles....it usually helps.

I have also bought Salonpass patches and put them on my back....they are like an icy hot patch. These patches work very good and are very inexpensive. I have bought them at a pharmacy or your local grocery store for under $5 or you can buy them at Costco.
Hopefully other CC have helpful ideas icon_smile.gif

Hope this helps icon_smile.gif

ladyellam Posted 7 May 2010 , 3:17am
post #3 of 13

I have 3 "slipped" discs in my lumbar which makes it excruciating pain all day, everyday. In the past 10 years there hasn't been a day where my back hasn't hurt. That being said, the only thing that has helped me is to do some yoga moves. If I stretch out, then the pain is almost tolerable.

Give it a try and just do a couple of moves and I hope it helps you!

kizrash Posted 7 May 2010 , 7:04am
post #4 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChoueiriCakeCo

How do you all deal with back pains from decorating for hours?? It's becoming a problem for me, and I usually sit while I work, but I've been having pain that lasts all day. I've never had back problems before, and I don't want this to turn into a bigger problem icon_redface.gif




I have a condition called syringomyelia, it is slowly destroying my spinal cord and is the most painful condition to have to deal with. Through attending a pain clinic on a weekly basis I've learnt to pace myself at everything I try to do. One of the main things I learnt is when my back starts to ache I have to take time out from what I'm doing and rest then go back to the job in question later. So if possible give yourself extra time and take time out, I've found it helps. HTH

cs_confections Posted 7 May 2010 , 7:44am
post #5 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by ladyellam

I have 3 "slipped" discs in my lumbar which makes it excruciating pain all day, everyday. In the past 10 years there hasn't been a day where my back hasn't hurt. That being said, the only thing that has helped me is to do some yoga moves. If I stretch out, then the pain is almost tolerable.

Give it a try and just do a couple of moves and I hope it helps you!




1 ruptured (surgeon fixed but nerves it hit still damaged), and 1 herniated (surgeon couldn't fix). Never have done yoga...used to do pilates daily pre-surgery, but now range of movement is restricted. Any advice on what I should look for? Floor work is outicon_sad.gif

For me, it's knowing when enough is enough and taking a break with legs elevated and an icepack against my back and taking advil regularly for inflamation. Also, taking a break to walk around, even if it's walking circles around the house while I'm returning phone calls.

Figure out if your back pain responds better to cold or heat - inflamation or muscle pain. Learn your limit and try to recognize when you get to a point when it's better to take a break than to keep pushing through. I know if I don't take that break, I'm paying for it up to a week or so later. It makes me not feel so bad for stopping for 30-60 minutes.

Also, even though you're sitting, your work surface may not be a proper height from your seated or standing position. Do you find yourself hunching over your work? Find a taller work surface or lower chair. Good luck - back pain is no funicon_sad.gif

ChoueiriCakeCo Posted 7 May 2010 , 11:40am
post #6 of 13

Thank you all for your responses. This is definitely something that I will have to figure out how to resolve. Once I get into my work it's hard for me to stop even when I feel pain. Taking breaks, streching and using heat patches/warm baths sound like great solutions. I also find myself a bit hunched over while i'm working on making small figures and things. I may have to get a chair just for my work icon_smile.gif

mamawrobin Posted 7 May 2010 , 11:53am
post #7 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Normita

I am wondering that too!! My back usually hurts when I have been working on a cake for a while. I usually just take a nice warm bath with some soaking bath salts to ease my aching muscles....it usually helps.

I have also bought Salonpass patches and put them on my back....they are like an icy hot patch. These patches work very good and are very inexpensive. I have bought them at a pharmacy or your local grocery store for under $5 or you can buy them at Costco.
Hopefully other CC have helpful ideas icon_smile.gif

Hope this helps icon_smile.gif




I also use the patches. I use the larger menthol patches and they really do help when my back is strained from decorating. They are inexpensive and to my suprise work very well.

essence706 Posted 7 May 2010 , 12:39pm
post #8 of 13

I have chronic back pain (have had 3 back surgeries so far-spinal fusions and scs implant). Besides going to a pain clinic monthly, I use ice packs and rest. Also having support helps. I have a special back support brace but I know Walmart has support belts. You can wear that only while standing/working for hours at a time and then remove it once you're finished. Stretching also helps to keep the muscles loose. Oh one more thing if you have a dh/mate who doesn't mind giving a backrub that works well too lol.

brincess_b Posted 7 May 2010 , 1:16pm
post #9 of 13

sort your posture! its very easy to slip into odd positions while your doing stuff, caking or not. keep a close eye on your posture and make a concious effort to fix it.

also, exercise. think about your core strength as thats what really supports your back/ spine. so things like yoga and pilates are good, but any exercise will help cause you should always be thinking of your posture!
xx

dcarylmk Posted 7 May 2010 , 1:41pm
post #10 of 13

You could also purchase a Gel Pro Mat from chefscatalog.com. They are a little pricey but definetly helps when you are on your feet for long periods of time. I've heard Gordon Food Service also have gel mats but I haven't checked those out yet.

costumeczar Posted 7 May 2010 , 10:44pm
post #11 of 13

Gel mats are good, and stop and stretch your shoulders for 5 minutes an hour. Do a search for stretching exercises for back pain in google images and you should come up with a bunch of photos. It also helps to sit and put your ankle on the opposite knee, then lean forward toward your shin on the leg that's resting on the knee. You'll feel the stretch in your hip and lower back.

ChoueiriCakeCo Posted 8 May 2010 , 1:01am
post #12 of 13

Thanks, everyone. I'm hoping it will get better now that I have all of these tips to keep in mind icon_smile.gif

bakermom3107 Posted 8 May 2010 , 4:07am
post #13 of 13

Thank you for bringing this up!! And thank you to everyone for all the great ideas!! I usually have to take a couple Aleve on my decorating days, but I've been looking for help that doesn't involve drugsicon_smile.gif

I've been wanting a Gel-Pro (but they ARE expensive) so I'll have to check out GFS. Right now I use the large interlocking foam-likefloor pads made for kids' rooms... they help a little.

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%