Need Advice For A Proposal To A Church

Business By Cherise09 Updated 8 May 2010 , 11:16pm by Cherise09

Cherise09 Posted 7 May 2010 , 12:38am
post #1 of 7

I got in contact with 4 different churches that would all be willing to hear my proposal about renting their kitchen space. Im asking for advise on what to put into the letter.
Im not sure how my business ill project, and unsure how much time ill actually need in the kitchen per week, ya know? How would i say that in the letter? I think i would like to rent on a need to basis, rather than a monthly charge. I read elsewhere that anywhere from $10-15 is the average hourly charge, is that true?
hmm... im just nevous and really hoping to nail these becuase I really want to get my foot in the door and finally start doing this for real.
Please help with any advice. Thank you!

6 replies
Loucinda Posted 7 May 2010 , 1:51pm
post #2 of 7

You might want to rephrase your title to this post.....put something in there about looking for pricing vs. a proposal. Good luck, I wish I were more help.

Chasey Posted 7 May 2010 , 2:15pm
post #3 of 7

I imagine the cost would vary, depending on what area of the country you live in.

Take a look at this site and see if you can get a general idea:

http://www.thekitchenspace.com/pricing.htm

Cherise09 Posted 8 May 2010 , 12:30am
post #4 of 7

Well the pricing is just a part of the advice i was looking for. Im unsure of the construction of the letter. Should i even talk about price? Or should I mention the benifits of having some cake decorator renting their kitchen? those sort of things?

Its times like these i thank god I stumbled across this website.. its great that we can share are experiences.

sari66 Posted 8 May 2010 , 1:22am
post #5 of 7

I don't think you need to talk about pricing I believe what they want to know is how and why you need to use their space, how often that sort of thing. You will need your own insurance if you hadn't thought of it.

HTH

artscallion Posted 8 May 2010 , 1:41am
post #6 of 7

The problem I ran into when exploring this route was that since most church kitchens do not sell food to the public, they are usually not up to the standards you will need them to be in order to be sell out of them. You might save yourself some trouble by looking into this first.

Find out what a kitchen needs (how many sinks, what kind, etc..to pass inspection in your area. Then take a peek at and see if these churches meet those standards.

The kitchen standards for serving food to a congregation are different than they are for selling food to the public.

Cherise09 Posted 8 May 2010 , 11:16pm
post #7 of 7

Thank you!

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