Fundraiser For St. Jude

Baking By babypooh Updated 11 May 2010 , 5:49pm by babypooh

babypooh Posted 6 May 2010 , 1:30pm
post #1 of 19

I have a lot of time on my hands, and some of you have shared some suggestions I could do with this time. I have never done a fundraiser before. St. Jude contacted me last year to do one for them, and I simply could not think of anything. Any and all suggestions from beginning to end process would be appreciated. I want to do this but not be overwhelmed.

18 replies
GeminiRJ Posted 6 May 2010 , 5:51pm
post #2 of 19

Just remember that they can ask for whatever they want, but it's up to you to give them what YOU want. I did some cookies for my sister when she was raising money for a breast cancer marathon. I made her cupcake cookies and pink awareness ribbon cookies. I bagged them up nice and pretty, and she sold them at a bake sale at the hospital. The ribbons, especially, were a huge hit. You don't have to get real fancy. Do cookies that people will have a hard time resisting! Look thru the cookie gallery to find inspiration, and find some designs that you will be comfortable doing. If you're going to be selling them at a hospital, maybe some surgical scrub top cookies would be tempting to the staff! Cookies that appeal to kids go over good, as parents and grandparents will be tempted to buy them. I would recommend not doing any copyright characters, though. Most of all, have fun with your cookie decorating!

babypooh Posted 6 May 2010 , 6:24pm
post #3 of 19

Thank you very very much...I will search for some ideas. I just realized what you meant by characters. I was thinking about doing their logo, if they have one. I would like to do something that would focus on the hospital, and the children. I did cookies for my duaghters track dinner, only 24 and OMG that was more work than I thought. So I'm probably going to have to really plan, so that it doesn't overwhelm me. Any thoughts come to mind for the hospital or children. GeminiRJ you mentioned surgical scrub? I'm not sure what you mean. And again thank you for your response. If I should get a lot of responses, I want to thank you in advance for your help.

Phyllis52 Posted 6 May 2010 , 8:30pm
post #4 of 19

I am in a similar position - I'm trying to think of what to do cookiewise for Leukemia and Lymphoma Society.

Any ideas? Thank you.

bonniebakes Posted 6 May 2010 , 9:35pm
post #5 of 19

Each time someone I know is in the hospital I bake cookies for the hospital staff...

The doctors and nurses really seem to like "medical" things... band-aids, shots, thermometers, pill bottles, etc. The doctor and nurse bears were also a big hit.

I did blood bags and bloods cells a lot and they were easy and the doctors liked them. There are several sets of pictures in my photos from when my sister-in-law was in the hospital for treatment for leukemia.

babypooh - surgical scrubs are the "outfits" that doctors wear during surgery.

babypooh Posted 6 May 2010 , 9:51pm
post #6 of 19

Now I'm embarrassed, I should have realized it when I typed it....it was those darn 24 cookies that took the umph out of me(smile) thanks for the suggestions. Doing things for others really feel a lot less stressful than having to do it for a paying customer...so for all of you out there over 50 and up and are doing this as a business...my hat goes out to you especially if you are doing a lot of business. bonniebakes thank you...Your pictures and GeminRJ pictures are very very impressive....this whole forum is motivating and its teaching me a lot...thanks guys!!!!

GL79 Posted 6 May 2010 , 9:59pm
post #7 of 19

I like the cookies but not the design. How about making the cookies not hospital related, like flowers, butterflies, cars etc... Have you everthought of making cupcakes.

cookiemookie Posted 6 May 2010 , 11:47pm
post #8 of 19

I would do something cheerful like smiles.flowers ect. Do them in vibrant colors.

When I do cookies for fundraisers I like to try new things(cutters,colors.techniques) It gives me a reason to practice. I've found that the recepients are happy with any donation of goods that taste great!

I am like you and just do cookies as a hobby and I am also over 50.

Have you tried stenciling? Once you get the hang of it you can do some pretty amazing cookies relatively fast. Another plus is it is easier on my arthritis. icon_wink.gif

candicemorgannicholson Posted 7 May 2010 , 12:00am
post #9 of 19

First I have to thank you for everything you are doing. I work for St. Jude and do cakes on the side. I do see first hand how people donating and doing fundraisers truly makes cures possible. Ok so now for ideas for your cookies. The keyword around St. Jude is HOPE. Everything around here is based on it. Maybe you could do that with the icing in super bright summer colors, like bright blue, lime, pink, etc. Also there is a logo but I would like it would be difficult unless you had a cutter. Maybe if you have a cricut you could cut it out on there. I have attached a picture of it as well. In case you need more inspiration the website is www.stjude.org. HTH.

GeminiRJ Posted 7 May 2010 , 11:44am
post #10 of 19

babypooh, if you go and look at the photos posted by RitchVisons, you will find an example of cookies decorate like surgical scrubs. Lots of bright, fun colors and a very cute design. Not too complicated, which makes it even better! Good luck! Don't forget to post pictures of the cookies so we can all see what you did!

JGMB Posted 7 May 2010 , 1:27pm
post #11 of 19

I guess my tips would be to start now! On a weekly basis, take advantage of the Michael's, Joann's and Hobby Lobby 40% off coupons to buy cookie bags. If you wait till the week of the fundraiser, they'll cost you an arm and a leg.

Also, you can do one batch of cookies every few days and freeze them so you don't get overwhelmed at the last minute. Bake and decorate them with glace and freeze them in Rubbermaid containers between layers of wax paper once they're completely dry. Let them come to room temp, then bag them individually.

Most of all, don't stress yourself out -- just have fun with it!!! I do this for our community's transitional housing program every summer, and people are always willing to buy the cookies whether they look perfect or not!

babypooh Posted 8 May 2010 , 1:23am
post #12 of 19

You guys are the best!!! After I bake these cookies and get them all bagged up and ready to go...this might sound stupid....but what I do at this point is go to different places and ask them if I can sell the cookies there ?....St. Jude will give me envelopes and flyers to help me,...I'm just not sure about the places that are off limit ...I'm sorry I usually bake and give away. HELP! Maybe I should set a table outside a grocery store and sell them that way? I know I am making this harder than it should be...sorry!

bonniebakes Posted 8 May 2010 , 1:27pm
post #13 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by babypooh

You guys are the best!!! After I bake these cookies and get them all bagged up and ready to go...this might sound stupid....but what I do at this point is go to different places and ask them if I can sell the cookies there ?....St. Jude will give me envelopes and flyers to help me,...I'm just not sure about the places that are off limit ...I'm sorry I usually bake and give away. HELP! Maybe I should set a table outside a grocery store and sell them that way? I know I am making this harder than it should be...sorry!




I misunderstood your post and I thought you were baking them for a St. Jude Fundraiser (as a donation for the fundraiser, not to raise money for St. Jude).

You really might want to check with your local health department about it... if you aren't creating them in a licensed kitchen, it might not be legal for you to sell them, even if the money is going to a non-profit.

babypooh Posted 8 May 2010 , 11:47pm
post #14 of 19

Now, see there I never thought about that. I thought as long as I could bake them and sell them, with the envelopes provided by ST. Jude, it would be ok....so I guess if I bake them in our church kitchen, could I decorate them from my house?.

babypooh Posted 8 May 2010 , 11:52pm
post #15 of 19

Are there other topics somewhere on this forum where I could go back and do some research on how others have managed to do fundraisers. This might be easier for me and less work for you guys to provide me with information. And there just might be other circumstances that have occurred with others that I might need to consider in doing this. But I am still determined!!!!

MBHazel Posted 9 May 2010 , 1:40am
post #16 of 19

Sorry, I goofed up my reply last night, I guess it it went out as a new topic. Anyway.....


Do you have local friends that decorate, or maybe you're a member of ICES; perhaps you can recruit a number of decorators to prepare items for a sale.

As far as a fundraiser sale you could also contact your local Kiwanis or Aktion Club and ask for their help. (Aktion club is a Kiwanis sponsored group for special needs yound people who do community service through their clubs.)

So you and your group make decorated cookies, cupcakes, etc and the Kiwanis or Aktion Club sponsors and "mans" the bake sales at local stores / malls.

If you get the radio stations to advertise you could sell a good bit and the load would have been shared by many.

bonniebakes Posted 9 May 2010 , 2:08pm
post #17 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by babypooh

Now, see there I never thought about that. I thought as long as I could bake them and sell them, with the envelopes provided by ST. Jude, it would be ok....so I guess if I bake them in our church kitchen, could I decorate them from my house?.




I don't think so.... I think the entire food handling process would have to be done in the licensed facility.

Cookies4kids Posted 10 May 2010 , 1:27am
post #18 of 19

I represent a group of over 30 gals that spend all our volunteer hours working for a camp that serves severly disabled children. We have several different fundraisers each year and it is amazing how much the business world will do to help you out if you only ask. Local bakeries have helped us with the packaging, and printers have done our headers, etc. One large independent craft shop has just given us a wonderful yearly grant to help with expenses. It brings tears to my eyes to see how willing people are to help out when they can see where their donations are going. Once you get rolling, Babypooh, it justs seems to get easier and easier. The most important thing is to thank these people in a personal way whenever you can. Good luck!!!

babypooh Posted 11 May 2010 , 5:49pm
post #19 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cookies4kids

I represent a group of over 30 gals that spend all our volunteer hours working for a camp that serves severly disabled children. We have several different fundraisers each year and it is amazing how much the business world will do to help you out if you only ask. Local bakeries have helped us with the packaging, and printers have done our headers, etc. One large independent craft shop has just given us a wonderful yearly grant to help with expenses. It brings tears to my eyes to see how willing people are to help out when they can see where their donations are going. Once you get rolling, Babypooh, it justs seems to get easier and easier. The most important thing is to thank these people in a personal way whenever you can. Good luck!!!


WOW! How great is that. I will review all of what you guys have given me...I know there are a lot of you guys who do these fundraisers and are willing to share with me some things that I to can do. Will keep you posted in the future abt. this event. Thank YOU!!!

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