Ugh!!! What Did I Do??

Baking By umgrzfn Updated 8 May 2010 , 2:25am by verono

umgrzfn Posted 6 May 2010 , 1:09am
post #1 of 16

I made some cookies for some students at the school I go to and I iced them with a poured fondant recipe (PS, milk, corn syrup) When they dried, some cracked, some had both, and NOOOOO shine. Here's the kicker, SOME of them dried great, still no shine, but didn't crack/have white spots.

HELP!!! I want a good icing that won't crack, or have spots and dry shiny. I DO NOT like RI icing (the taste). Is there ANY thing else I can try????

15 replies
CookieD-oh Posted 6 May 2010 , 1:11am
post #2 of 16

Use glace icing and add brite white gel color to the whole batch before you add color for your design. The brite white will help stop the spotting/sugar bloom.

ddaigle Posted 6 May 2010 , 1:30am
post #3 of 16

Poured fondant is fragile and used for petit fours or dipping cupcakes. Use Toba's Glace or Royal Icing for your cookies. Poured fondant and royal icing dries kinda dull. Toba's Glace has a little sheen to it. Are you adding flavor to your royal icing? That makes a HUGE difference.

PinkZiab Posted 6 May 2010 , 1:41am
post #4 of 16

Poured fondant should be nice and glossy, but loses its shine when it's overheated. It really shouldn't by warmed to more than 95 degrees or so. I will say that the recipe you described is really more of a glaze than an actual poured fondant (which is made with granulated sugar and not powdered).

ddaigle Posted 6 May 2010 , 1:48am
post #5 of 16

Pink...my poured fondant recipe I use for my petit fours is made with powdered sugar, 1/2 c. water and 1/2 c. karo (plus flavoring). It does have a little sheen to it but I wouldn't call it glossy. I have never heard of a recipe made with granulated sugar...? What is your recipe...and is this what you use for your petit fours? I'm always intrested in new recipes.

Dreme Posted 6 May 2010 , 3:26am
post #6 of 16

Fondant in general. You can work faster and it allows for more creativity. Not shiny, but it has a bit of its own clean look. As far as taste, homemade fondant usually is better.

nancyg Posted 6 May 2010 , 3:48am
post #7 of 16

ddaigle

what is your exact rercipe for petit poured fondant glaze? Water, corn syrup, and confectioners sugar.....How much of each. I would like to try petit fours....

thanks

verono Posted 6 May 2010 , 11:57am
post #8 of 16

I use a variation of toba's glace for my cookies..
I don't use milk, I use water..
And since I started using 2X more corn sirup than water, I don't have white spot anymore.
And for the cracks, don't move your cookies when they are drying.. icon_smile.gif

ddaigle Posted 6 May 2010 , 12:56pm
post #9 of 16

Nancy, I use one bag of PS, 1/2 c. corn syrup, 1/2 c. water and 1 tsp. almond extract. I have actually made friends with PT4's and enjoy making them! I only use this recipe to dip cupcakes or PT4's. I use Royal for cookies.

PinkZiab Posted 6 May 2010 , 4:17pm
post #10 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by ddaigle

Pink...my poured fondant recipe I use for my petit fours is made with powdered sugar, 1/2 c. water and 1/2 c. karo (plus flavoring). It does have a little sheen to it but I wouldn't call it glossy. I have never heard of a recipe made with granulated sugar...? What is your recipe...and is this what you use for your petit fours? I'm always intrested in new recipes.




A true poured fondant is made by cooking sugar and then re-crystallizing it in a way that it becomes thick and glossy through agitation. All of the "fondant" recipes out there that use powdered sugar with corn syrup, milk, water, etc etc, are really what I like to called "faux fondant" glazes.

This is a really easy poured fondant recipe that is made using a food processor for the agitation/recrystallization. Again, after it's made, the key to keeping it glossy is to never reheat it to more than 100 degrees (although I prefer to keep around 95-96, just to be safe).

http://cakecentral.com/recipes/7449/food-processor-poured-fondant

This recipe can be used for petits four glace, eclairs, bon bon, cherry cordials... anywhere you would want to use a poured fondant.

TracyLH Posted 7 May 2010 , 10:32am
post #11 of 16

PinkZiab -Thanks for sharing your knowledge with us. icon_smile.gif It is very much appreciated.

PinkZiab Posted 7 May 2010 , 6:36pm
post #12 of 16

Just to show an example, here are two eclairs dipped in poured fondant. The coffee eclair, as you can see, has dried to a nice glossy finish, but the vanilla is quite dull, because the fondant was over-heated.
LL

floral1210 Posted 7 May 2010 , 6:39pm
post #13 of 16

They both look good enough to eat! icon_wink.gif

TracyLH Posted 8 May 2010 , 12:28am
post #14 of 16

Oh, thanks, PinkZiab! There is so much to learn from you. icon_smile.gif Thanks for the pics!

drakegore Posted 8 May 2010 , 12:52am
post #15 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by verono

I use a variation of toba's glace for my cookies..
I don't use milk, I use water..
And since I started using 2X more corn sirup than water, I don't have white spot anymore.
And for the cracks, don't move your cookies when they are drying.. icon_smile.gif




i also use toba's with water. adding americolor (NOT, NOT, NOT wilton) white will help avoid spots too (i use this with all colors including and especially darks). but i do know of other cookie folk who swear by using milk to avoid spots. i just like the way it looks and performs with water.

i make mine a little thicker than toba's recipe (she uses 3/8 cup each liquid and CS to 1lb PS, i use just a bit over 1/4 cup each). it seems to me that i have less problems with everything when i use a thicker flood icing.

verono, i have a question for you icon_smile.gif. do you have a longer drying time using 2x corn syrup to water? when i have done this, i have had problems with getting the cookies to dry well.



diane

verono Posted 8 May 2010 , 2:25am
post #16 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by drakegore

Quote:
Originally Posted by verono

I use a variation of toba's glace for my cookies..
I don't use milk, I use water..
And since I started using 2X more corn sirup than water, I don't have white spot anymore.
And for the cracks, don't move your cookies when they are drying.. icon_smile.gif



i also use toba's with water. adding americolor (NOT, NOT, NOT wilton) white will help avoid spots too (i use this with all colors including and especially darks). but i do know of other cookie folk who swear by using milk to avoid spots. i just like the way it looks and performs with water.

i make mine a little thicker than toba's recipe (she uses 3/8 cup each liquid and CS to 1lb PS, i use just a bit over 1/4 cup each). it seems to me that i have less problems with everything when i use a thicker flood icing.

verono, i have a question for you icon_smile.gif. do you have a longer drying time using 2x corn syrup to water? when i have done this, i have had problems with getting the cookies to dry well.


diane




I can't say... I've done that for a long time now..
And I don't add white to the whole batch.. because when I have to do dark colors it takes more gel to achieve it and THEN I have spots..

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