Where Do You Get Gluten Free Ingredients

Decorating By naubin Updated 23 May 2010 , 3:11pm by endymion

naubin Posted 5 May 2010 , 5:53pm
post #1 of 23

I am asking for your direction as to where I could get Gluten Free Ingredients for some baking I have to do next month? I am not sure if there is a good online store to order from, or if I should look locally. There is not a huge selection of stores that would carry specialty products like almond flour, or xanthan gum.

Suggestions please.

22 replies
ChefAngie Posted 5 May 2010 , 6:21pm
post #2 of 23

It all depends on how much is needed.
You can get gluten free products from supermarkets-call first to find out where and the cost.
Go to www.bulkfoods.com.
Seven day adventist store.
Health food stores.
Hope this helps.
Happy Baking and decorating,
Chef Angie

foxymomma521 Posted 5 May 2010 , 6:26pm
post #3 of 23

amazon.com

vlk Posted 5 May 2010 , 7:40pm
post #4 of 23

What about Gluten Free Icing? Buttercream Icing... crazy question, but is all icing Gluten free?

artscallion Posted 5 May 2010 , 8:04pm
post #5 of 23

Powdered sugar is gluten free, as is butter, crisco, most vanilla extracts, eggs and meringue powders. So most frostingsis and .

My local market (Stop & Shop) carries the Bob's Red Mill brand of products which include most of the common gluten free products (you can also buy them online) as does our local Job Lot dollar store and the Whole Foods Market chain.

nwnest Posted 5 May 2010 , 8:38pm
post #6 of 23

I agree with artscallion. Bob's Red Mill has awesome gluten free products, and recipes, too. I'm lucky enough to be driving distance to the source, but they sell mail-order, too.

However, I would check your local health food stores first. A lot of times they sell in bulk, and you can buy what you need. For example: Bob's Red Mill packages Xanthan gum in 8 oz. packages for $12, but a recipe might call for less than a teaspoon, if your healthfood store carries it you can buy an ounce.

Do you have a Trader Joe's? They sell almond flour.

peg818 Posted 5 May 2010 , 9:09pm
post #7 of 23

Here all the major grocery stores carry alot of this stuff. I find the specialty flours in the organic isle.

loulou2 Posted 5 May 2010 , 9:21pm
post #8 of 23

Target carries alot of gluten free products. I notice more stuff every time I go in.

gramof5 Posted 5 May 2010 , 9:22pm
post #9 of 23

I go to "specialty" grocery stores like Central Market or Whole Foods, but I'm finding more and more GF stuff in stores like Kroger and Super Target.

naubin Posted 6 May 2010 , 12:34am
post #10 of 23

Wow, thanks for all your help. thumbs_up.gif We have a specialty store and a Target here I will check both of those stores maybe I will get lucky icon_biggrin.gif

Jayde Posted 6 May 2010 , 12:43am
post #11 of 23

Bob's Red Mills is overpriced and gross in comparison to a lot of other things out there.

http://www.ener-g.com/

I have celiac disease and this is where I shop. Shipping isnt too outrageous, and the prices are actually decent if you buy in bulk. If you are just buying to make one cake, its not that worth it.

FYI, Betty Crocker sells a GF chocolate and vanilla cake mix. I add sour cream and extra vanilla, and to the chocolate sour cream and some melted chocolate. It turns out pretty decent, but goes stale fast.

Their chocolate chip GF cookie mix is pretty amazing though icon_smile.gif

ladyk333 Posted 6 May 2010 , 12:48am
post #12 of 23

I thought that most powdered sugar contains cornstarch (mine does) and is therefore not gluten free. Does someone know the answer to this?

gramof5 Posted 6 May 2010 , 12:49am
post #13 of 23

I buy the Namaste vanilla cake mix, add 4 eggs, 3/4 c orange juice, 3/4 c oil, a box of vanilla pudding (Jello brand is GF), mix and bake 2 8" layers at 350 F. Tastes pretty good.

Jayde Posted 6 May 2010 , 12:53am
post #14 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by ladyk333

I thought that most powdered sugar contains cornstarch (mine does) and is therefore not gluten free. Does someone know the answer to this?




cornstarch is GF, it is actually one of the things that they use in GF flour replacement mixes.

artscallion Posted 6 May 2010 , 12:53am
post #15 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by ladyk333

I thought that most powdered sugar contains cornstarch (mine does) and is therefore not gluten free. Does someone know the answer to this?




There is no gluten in cornstarch.

elainem51 Posted 6 May 2010 , 12:54am
post #16 of 23

If you make a gluten free cake & frosting, do you need to mix and bake with equipment that is gluten free???? Hope this makes sense. I was ask to make a gluten free cake but was afraid the cake would pick up flour or some other ingredient that was not gluten free.

ladyk333 Posted 6 May 2010 , 2:57pm
post #17 of 23

Thanks! Yes, I looked up foods that contain gluten and cornstarch is safe. I don't know what put that idea in my head?!

jobueno Posted 6 May 2010 , 3:09pm
post #18 of 23

Here is a fabulous way to save yourself some money on store bought products.
This formula is the same as the Bob Mills packages:

Gluten free flour susbstitute
The Ingredients
6 cups white rice flour
2 cups potato starch (flaked potatoes can substitute)
1 cup tapioca flour



The Method
You can sustitute this mix cup for cup in all your favorite recpies!!!

Powdered sugar, Vegetable shortening, Butter, eggs are all gluten free so you can make your own BC icing. Just make sure your vanilla is either homemade with a good grade Vodka and vanilla beans or you can buy McCormick Vanilla which is also gluten free. Good luck!

KHalstead Posted 6 May 2010 , 3:25pm
post #19 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by ladyk333

I thought that most powdered sugar contains cornstarch (mine does) and is therefore not gluten free. Does someone know the answer to this?




You do have to be careful, not ALL powdered sugar is gluten free. Aldi's powdered sugar however IS gluten free and you can't beat the price around $1 for 2 lbs. (it's labeled "gluten free" on the back)

jobueno Posted 6 May 2010 , 3:53pm
post #20 of 23

Here is a fabulous way to save yourself some money on store bought products.
This formula is the same as the Bob Mills packages:

Gluten free flour susbstitute
The Ingredients
6 cups white rice flour
2 cups potato starch (flaked potatoes can substitute)
1 cup tapioca flour



The Method
You can sustitute this mix cup for cup in all your favorite recpies!!!

Powdered sugar, Vegetable shortening, Butter, eggs are all gluten free so you can make your own BC icing. Just make sure your vanilla is either homemade with a good grade Vodka and vanilla beans or you can buy McCormick Vanilla which is also gluten free. Good luck!

Jayde Posted 7 May 2010 , 12:51am
post #21 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by elainem51

If you make a gluten free cake & frosting, do you need to mix and bake with equipment that is gluten free???? Hope this makes sense. I was ask to make a gluten free cake but was afraid the cake would pick up flour or some other ingredient that was not gluten free.




I dont have separate pans for making GF things. What I do is to wash in hot soapy water, and rinse in a sinkful of hot warm with 1/2 cup of bleach added to it. Rinse again in clean hot water, and then it goes into another bath of boiling bleach water for 10 minutes before I take them out for the final rinse.

auzzi Posted 21 May 2010 , 1:42pm
post #22 of 23
Quote:
Quote:

2 cups potato starch (flaked potatoes can substitute)




Flaked potatoes will NOT substitute for potato starch.

Flaked potatoes is cooked potato that is pulverised to a powder. It is rarely used in baking as it produces a dense heavy crumb with a strong potato flavour.

Potato starch is the carbohydrate extracted from the tuber: it is odourless and flavourless. It is used in gluten-free flour blends. A substitute would be cornstarch..

==

People who are coeliac, allergic to wheat, or just gluten- sensitive or intolerant, are vigilant about what they eat. The times that they are "glutened" is when they ingest product that is cross-contaminated at the food source.

Baking Notes: not complete and not limited to -
1. No wooden utensils: they are highly absorbent [no rolling pin, no cake board]
2. No wooden and plastic cutting boards: nicks, grooves and scratches can retain particles
3. No Plastic storage containers (absorbs gluten just like food odours and colours).
4. Dont use the same flour-sifter for gluten-free and regular flours.
5. Dont prepare gluten-free foods on the same surface used to prepare foods with gluten unless the surface has been thoroughly cleaned.
6. "Dip and spread" products, eg peanut butter or honey, could be contaminated from previous usage.
7. items [eg piping tips, cookie cutters] , and baking pans that are made with "seams", "rivets", or crevices, may accumulate gluten material and runs a risk of contamination.

Flour dust [containing gluten] can stay airborne in kitchens for many hours after use. When it settles, it will contaminate surfaces, utensils, and uncovered gluten-free food.

endymion Posted 23 May 2010 , 3:11pm
post #23 of 23

Yeah, my friend who has Celiac's say she really canot eat anything prepared in a kitchen where flour is regularly used. Even when you are using ingredients that should be gluten free (such as sugar or cornstarch), she says that these items typically get contaminated via previous flour-based baking.

She said I could bake her a cake only using her own pans and utensils (and making sure counters, etc. were covered with freezer paper or something similar) ... or preferably in her own kitchen.

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