Can You Refrigerate Fondant Covered Cakes?

Decorating By bvwilliams Updated 23 May 2014 , 6:27am by mmancuso

mariana7842731 Posted 3 May 2010 , 10:02pm
post #31 of 98

I think cake without pershible ingredients is something I would pass on. It better have fresh natural ingredients with a vry short shelf life, and not a speck of crisco anywhere on it.

SallyBratt Posted 3 May 2010 , 10:34pm
post #32 of 98

I refrigerate all of my fondant cakes. That's how I was taught to do it and I think Bonnie Gordon is pretty much an expert in the cake world.

What filling worth eating isn't perishable? Personally, I wouldn't touch Crisco based spackle with a 10' pole...and neither would any of my customers.

costumeczar Posted 3 May 2010 , 10:42pm
post #33 of 98

The fondant cakes I refrigerate don't develop the air bubbles. Maybe you could try pressing down on the tiers really well before crumb-coating them, that helps to get out any air pockets that are in there that will move around. You can get air bubbles with fondant or buttercream, I don't think it's a fondant issue so much as an air-pocket-in-the-cake issue.

mamawrobin Posted 3 May 2010 , 10:55pm
post #34 of 98

I use ganache on most all of my cakes. I've never even heard of crisco spackle. icon_lol.gif

SallyBratt Posted 3 May 2010 , 11:22pm
post #35 of 98

it's 'butter'cream but the some or all of the butter is replaced with shortening. It's a bit of a misnomer to call it buttercream...really.

Here's a recipe I just found online for it. it's sounds horrid...

1 ½ cups of Crisco (1 ½ sticks of Crisco)
2 Tablespoons imitation vanilla extract put in cup,
then add milk to equal 1/2 cup total.
2 lb bag of powdered sugar

Place Crisco in a mixer bowl. Add milk/vanilla mixture and a little powdered sugar.
Mix on low speed gradually adding the rest of the powdered sugar.
Mix on the highest setting for 7 minutes, stopping in the middle of mixing to scrape the bowl sides and bottom. Be sure to mix for the full 7 minutes.

Hint:
If using white Crisco, so the icing will be white, add ½ teaspoon butter flavoring or oil to the recipe before mixing. Also use clear vanilla extract.
If using butter flavored Crisco, there is no need to add the butter flavoring. You can also use regular imitation vanilla extract. The icing will be a cream color.

mariana7842731 Posted 3 May 2010 , 11:23pm
post #36 of 98

Gagalishis!

Eisskween Posted 3 May 2010 , 11:33pm
post #37 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by SallyBratt

it's 'butter'cream but the some or all of the butter is replaced with shortening. It's a bit of a misnomer to call it buttercream...really.

Here's a recipe I just found online for it. it's sounds horrid...

1 ½ cups of Crisco (1 ½ sticks of Crisco)
2 Tablespoons imitation vanilla extract put in cup,
then add milk to equal 1/2 cup total.
2 lb bag of powdered sugar

Place Crisco in a mixer bowl. Add milk/vanilla mixture and a little powdered sugar.
Mix on low speed gradually adding the rest of the powdered sugar.
Mix on the highest setting for 7 minutes, stopping in the middle of mixing to scrape the bowl sides and bottom. Be sure to mix for the full 7 minutes.

Hint:
If using white Crisco, so the icing will be white, add ½ teaspoon butter flavoring or oil to the recipe before mixing. Also use clear vanilla extract.
If using butter flavored Crisco, there is no need to add the butter flavoring. You can also use regular imitation vanilla extract. The icing will be a cream color.





Why, oh why, is there no hurling emoticon?

costumeczar Posted 3 May 2010 , 11:49pm
post #38 of 98

At least there's some milk in it. I've seen some recipes where there's nothing but imitation this and that plus the crisco.

SallyBratt Posted 3 May 2010 , 11:53pm
post #39 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by costumeczar

At least there's some milk in it. I've seen some recipes where there's nothing but imitation this and that plus the crisco.




I found one on this site, actually, that's pretty much just crisco and powdered sugar.

Do people really eat that?

Eisskween Posted 4 May 2010 , 12:01am
post #40 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by SallyBratt

Quote:
Originally Posted by costumeczar

At least there's some milk in it. I've seen some recipes where there's nothing but imitation this and that plus the crisco.



I found one on this site, actually, that's pretty much just crisco and powdered sugar.

Do people really eat that?




That has to be the lovely W----- recipe, used for practice in many classes. Many of the students get that confused with real icing and actually feed that to people.

costumeczar Posted 4 May 2010 , 12:14am
post #41 of 98

We used pure crisco icing to practice roses in culinary school, but that was considered the "broke student's practice icing" because you could use it over and over and it wouldn't rot.

A lot of people in the U.S. are used to non-butter buttercream because that's what they use in grocery stores, and they don't know any better. I use both IMBC and the confectioner's sugar icings, some people really like the sweeter one, but it's not my choice. I do put butter in mine, though, and when people try it they say that it tastes really good (if they like the sweeter version not IMBC.) I always tell then that it's because it actually has butter in it, and it's not just crisco. It grosses them out to think that they've been eating all-crisco icing, but they don't know that's what it is until someone tells them.

I likey my meringue buttercreams, personally.

Eisskween Posted 4 May 2010 , 12:32am
post #42 of 98

I have never had anyone ask me for sweeter icing, quite the opposite, they ask me for icing that's "not too sweet." Of course it's icing and it's going to be sweet, but the PS/Crisco is sickeningly sweet. Just my opinion, of course.

The_Sugar_Fairy Posted 4 May 2010 , 12:45am
post #43 of 98

I was just reading the Confetti Cakes book (Elisa Strauss) and she said to NOT refrigerate a fondant covered cake. And I agree because if you use royal icing stencilling on top, for example, the condensation will melt the icing right off. It can also ruin any sugar flowers that are on the cake and cause bubbles under the fondant.

Adevag Posted 4 May 2010 , 12:53am
post #44 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by bvwilliams

I have to make a cake (that consist of 3 cakes) for someone but there is no way that I can decorate all 3 cakes on the same day. How long can fondant covered cakes sit out or can they be refrigerated?

Thanks,
Brenda




If you decide to refrigerate your cakes I would not do any hand painting on them before refrigeration (if that is included in your design). The risk of getting condensation on your cakes once you take them out from the fridge (for an hour or so, depending on size) until the cake is back at room temp, and the condensation would probably ruin your paintings.

underthesun Posted 4 May 2010 , 1:04am
post #45 of 98

Sugar is an incredible preservative! Check your ph level on fillings and icings. You'll be surprised how many (other than creams) do not need refrigeration. Yes, how fondant reacts totally has to do with humidity, in the refrigeration unit you are using. Here in Florida, I rarely put fondant in the fridge. Since all my cakes will be eaten within 3 days, I use many fresh fillings and icings, but no cream. Again, check your ph level. I would die to have Duffs walk in! BTW, according to Colette Peters, she never puts a fondant cake in the refrigerator. No need, everything has sugar in it.

Bluehue Posted 4 May 2010 , 2:38am
post #46 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by bvwilliams

I have to make a cake (that consist of 3 cakes) for someone but there is no way that I can decorate all 3 cakes on the same day. How long can fondant covered cakes sit out or can they be refrigerated?

Thanks,
Brenda




Wow - i bet you are well and truely confused now after reading the last three pages icon_wink.gif

IF you have covered your cake correctly - then no - please don't put it in a fridge.

I know - i know - a lot on here are saying - you must - but you will noctice that after they say that there is a *but*
Which only adds to the confusion.

There is a wonderful thing called *ganache* and you make that using only boiled cream and coverture chocolate.
Under fondant it is the perfect accessory -
And never do you place a ganached/fondant cake in a fridge.

Always remember - there is a very miniscuel line betwen your cake and the actual fondant - and its that very fine area UNDER YOUR FONDANT that also gets effected by the added moisture from the fridge.

You want your covered cake to stay firm to the touch - and *sharp* and this won't happen if you put it in the fridge.


Bluehue.

SallyBratt Posted 4 May 2010 , 4:16am
post #47 of 98

No...there isn't always a 'but'. If she's filled the cake with a perishable filling then it has to go back in the fridge whether it's iced with ganache or not. No 'buts' about it.

Bluehue Posted 4 May 2010 , 4:28am
post #48 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by SallyBratt

No...there isn't always a 'but'. If she's filled the cake with a perishable filling then it has to go back in the fridge whether it's iced with ganache or not. No 'buts' about it.





Re read many of the posts - and you will see many a *but*

You have no idea what you are speaking about -
A ganached cake does not go in the fridge - and if you have been making and using ganache for years - then you would understand and know why.

I doubt you have ever made a coverture chocolate and full cream ganache - if so - again, you would undestand the reasoning behind it.
Its the same old airy fairey story about what ganache do i use.
Ganache is just that.............. ganache
Coverture chocolate and full cream - nothing else.

I guess you are one of those people who tell others that there is *whipped ganache - runny ganache - hard ganache*

And considering ganache has only caught on in the States in the last 12 monthds or so - i find it hard to believe that so many of you have been apparently using it for yearssssssssssssssssss.

Why complicate things - why make something so simple so difficult for newbies to this craft.

Its not rocket science - its just ganache.



Bluehue

SallyBratt Posted 4 May 2010 , 4:40am
post #49 of 98

"You have no idea what you are speaking about"
"I doubt you have ever made a coverture chocolate and full cream ganache "
"I guess you are one of those people who tell others that there is *whipped ganache - runny ganache - hard ganache"

Rather presumptuous...don't you think? I have made coverture ganache and I use it quite often. I have also put ganached cakes in the fridge if I've used a perishable filling and I've NEVER had a problem with condensation or bubbles or anything of the sort. Please don't presume to know what I have and haven't done or what I know or don't know.

There's more than one way to skin a cat and it's not making things complicated at all by telling the OP different ways that we do things. Why assume the she only wants to use ganache anyway? If she uses SMBC, REAL SMBC, then she should refrigerate. If she fills and ices with ganache then she doesn't. If she fills with a perishable and ices with ganache then I think she should but hey, it's her party so if she wants to take the chance then that's fine.

Ganache is NOT the only way to ice a cake and I have more requests for SMBC than I do for ganache. Not everyone likes ganache.

ladyonzlake Posted 4 May 2010 , 4:42am
post #50 of 98

Hmmm, really? I've been using ganache for over 5 years and always put it in the frig...yes with my fondant covered cakes...no problems here.

I guess you do whatever works for you.

Bluehue Posted 4 May 2010 , 5:19am
post #51 of 98

Back to the actual point of this thread -
No, Fondant cakes do not need to go in the fridge -
It is only the creators wish to do so.
If (again) your cake is covered correctly - why?

I don't presume anything -
From what i have read on this thread - people really don't understand or know WHY they put cakes in the fridge....they just do.
You only have to look at all the *buts* -

what is your logic for placing a ganched cake in the fridge?
Because there is no *health/perishable* reasoning to it.

Perhaps the reasoning behind WHY you do it would be enlightening to some.

To say - because the decorators on TV do it - is not a reason - thats just copying - without even knowing or understanding why.

And the sweat - you might get in summertime when taking a fondant cake out of the fridge .............that is a concern
If you are so sure it doesn't effect the cake - then why would you place your fondant covered cake - in a cardboard box - then put in the fridge.

I know exactely why you do that -
Care to explain why .....to the OP
And whats worse - why would you want a fondant covered cake - absorbing cardboard smells - - or does that not matter.





Bluehue.

ceshell Posted 4 May 2010 , 5:48am
post #52 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by bvwilliams

I have to make a cake (that consist of 3 cakes) for someone but there is no way that I can decorate all 3 cakes on the same day. How long can fondant covered cakes sit out or can they be refrigerated?



I don't think the OP thought the cakes (fondant or otherwise) HAVE to go in the fridge but rather wanted to know if they CAN, and if not, how many days will they survive on the countertop; because of the time involved to decorate all three tiers, she wanted to know if she can let each cake sit out for several days before the entire cake is ready to assemble and deliver.

I suppose it would be a good time to refocus and address that issue (which, admittedly, is a popular question here on CC): "how long can a cake sit out and remain fresh?" We can say that they don't NEED to go in the fridge but are we talking about three days=no refrigeration needed to retain freshness? Seven days?

The point several of us made was just that, if you want to put them in the fridge to extend freshness, because you are concerned about them sitting on the counter for too many days in a row, then yes, for many of us, they actually "can" be refrigerated even with fondant. In my case, I often use freshly made custard or fruit fillings so for me it is indeed a must. I even commit the ultimate sacrilege of refrigerating my ganache-covered cakes (even without fondant) if the filling inside is highly perishable. The ganache will survive refrigeration; the custard won't survive 3 days on the countertop. Why do I use custard instead of a nonperishable filling? Who cares?

Several others made the important and relevant point that if there is nothing perishable in/on the cake, then the risks of refrigerating may outweigh the benefits, and besides: "why bother??". The point that decorators like Leah_S and IndyDebi make is, there are so many nonperishable fillings that can go into a cake, they don't find the need to hassle with refrigeration.

We can talk in circles about it all day but it still comes down to one answer re: "can you refrigerate a fondant cake" and that answer is..."Maybe." LOL icon_lol.gif

costumeczar Posted 4 May 2010 , 10:48am
post #53 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluehue

[

You have no idea what you are speaking about -
A ganached cake does not go in the fridge - and if you have been making and using ganache for years - then you would understand and know why.

I doubt you have ever made a coverture chocolate and full cream ganache - if so - again, you would undestand the reasoning behind it.
Its the same old airy fairey story about what ganache do i use.
Ganache is just that.............. ganache
Coverture chocolate and full cream - nothing else.

I guess you are one of those people who tell others that there is *whipped ganache - runny ganache - hard ganache*

And considering ganache has only caught on in the States in the last 12 monthds or so - i find it hard to believe that so many of you have been apparently using it for yearssssssssssssssssss.


Bluehue




Wow, that was rude.

A lot of people in the U.S use ganache, and we do know what we're doing. You don't seem to have an understanding of how some cakes have fillings inside them that may require refrigeration, though, since you asked a similar question on another thread. Are Australian cakes generally only one solid layer? In addition, the health department here requires that you refrigerate cakes, and you can refrigerate fondanted cakes. Absorbing the smell of cardboard? What about absorbing the smell of whatever your'e cooking for dinner if the cake is sitting out?

pattycakesnj Posted 4 May 2010 , 11:21am
post #54 of 98

I have been using ganache for years here in the USA and I refrigerate them because it is hot in my bakery!!!

momma28 Posted 4 May 2010 , 11:31am
post #55 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by costumeczar

I always refrigerate all of my cakes regardless of whether they have fondant or not, the health department likes it that way. I also find that they're easier to transport if they're cold. And as far as non-perishable fillings go, no, you wouldn't HAVE to refrigerate something that was a non-perishable filling, but the fillings that are perishable tend to taste better to me, so I use those the most. And I kind of consider myself an expert, if I do say so myself. icon_biggrin.gif




I too am in virginia and am under the same health department. I make all my cakes and fillings from scratch and use smbc. I ALWAYS refrigerate my cakes fondant or not. I have never had an issue even when it was black handpainting on white fondant ( I say that since some of the fear seems to be sweating that would make colors run).

I too prefer the taste fillings and buttercreams that happen to be perishable so I would never think of leaving them out, even though some feel smbc can be left out for days without refrigeration, but thats another thread.

momma28 Posted 4 May 2010 , 11:42am
post #56 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by The_Sugar_Fairy

I was just reading the Confetti Cakes book (Elisa Strauss) and she said to NOT refrigerate a fondant covered cake. And I agree because if you use royal icing stencilling on top, for example, the condensation will melt the icing right off. It can also ruin any sugar flowers that are on the cake and cause bubbles under the fondant.




I use royal icing to pipe quite often and always refrigerate with no issues.


Adevag wrote: If you decide to refrigerate your cakes I would not do any hand painting on them before refrigeration (if that is included in your design). The risk of getting condensation on your cakes once you take them out from the fridge (for an hour or so, depending on size) until the cake is back at room temp, and the condensation would probably ruin your paintings.

I was scared the first time I refrigerated a handpainted cake but had no choice (perishable filling) but it was no problem at all. Just make sure that the food coloring you use to paint has dried completely before you put it in the fridge. at that point its just like you tinted to fondant, its in there and doesnt bleed or run HTH

costumeczar Posted 4 May 2010 , 12:16pm
post #57 of 98

The only time that I've had a problem with gumpaste flowers getting soft and losing their shape was when I had a cake in a plastic holder at room temperature. The moisture from the icing must have recirculated and the gumpaste was completely ruined. I assume the same thing would happen to royal icing. When I refrigerate gumpaste it hasn't given me trouble even though I thought it would.

I had a friend who had a cake sitting out when a rainstorm came through, and every flower on it went limp, so having it out of the fridge isn't necessarily a safe bet!

SallyBratt Posted 4 May 2010 , 12:51pm
post #58 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluehue

Back to the actual point of this thread -
No, Fondant cakes do not need to go in the fridge -
It is only the creators wish to do so.
If (again) your cake is covered correctly - why?

I don't presume anything -
From what i have read on this thread - people really don't understand or know WHY they put cakes in the fridge....they just do.
You only have to look at all the *buts* -

what is your logic for placing a ganched cake in the fridge?
Because there is no *health/perishable* reasoning to it.

Perhaps the reasoning behind WHY you do it would be enlightening to some.

To say - because the decorators on TV do it - is not a reason - thats just copying - without even knowing or understanding why.

And the sweat - you might get in summertime when taking a fondant cake out of the fridge .............that is a concern
If you are so sure it doesn't effect the cake - then why would you place your fondant covered cake - in a cardboard box - then put in the fridge.

I know exactely why you do that -
Care to explain why .....to the OP
And whats worse - why would you want a fondant covered cake - absorbing cardboard smells - - or does that not matter.


Bluehue.





Yeah...you did presume...because you said 'you' don't know what 'you're' talking about and 'you' have likely never made ganache.

If you would actually read what people are saying you would know that they put cakes in the fridge because they use perishable fillings. Everyone has said that over and over and over. If I use fresh fruit or curds or cream cheese fillings I'm NOT leaving that out on my counter for days whether it's nicely packaged in ganache or not. In the States and Canada people want the option to have more than just ganache filling and mud cake. They want SMBC and cream cheese icing and fresh fruits and lots of other perishable fillings. We have to follow certain health guidelines and those guidelines say we must refrigerate those types of foods if we're selling them to the general public. If a health inspector came in and saw a cake on the counter and you told him that cake had been sitting out for 3 days and was filled with fruit and cream cheese he would toss it in the garbage. THAT is why we're saying that if you use perishable fillings you need to refrigerate.

why is that so hard to understand?

If you're worried about a cake absorbing cardboard smells why aren't you worried about it collecting airborne dust while it sits on your counter? No matter how clean your kitchen is there's going to be dust and hair and lots of other particles floating in the air. I don't want that on my cakes, thanks.

momma28 Posted 4 May 2010 , 12:56pm
post #59 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by SallyBratt

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluehue

Back to the actual point of this thread -
No, Fondant cakes do not need to go in the fridge -
It is only the creators wish to do so.
If (again) your cake is covered correctly - why?

I don't presume anything -
From what i have read on this thread - people really don't understand or know WHY they put cakes in the fridge....they just do.
You only have to look at all the *buts* -

what is your logic for placing a ganched cake in the fridge?
Because there is no *health/perishable* reasoning to it.

Perhaps the reasoning behind WHY you do it would be enlightening to some.

To say - because the decorators on TV do it - is not a reason - thats just copying - without even knowing or understanding why.

And the sweat - you might get in summertime when taking a fondant cake out of the fridge .............that is a concern
If you are so sure it doesn't effect the cake - then why would you place your fondant covered cake - in a cardboard box - then put in the fridge.

I know exactely why you do that -
Care to explain why .....to the OP
And whats worse - why would you want a fondant covered cake - absorbing cardboard smells - - or does that not matter.


Bluehue.




Yeah...you did presume...because you said 'you' don't know what 'you're' talking about and 'you' have likely never made ganache.

If you would actually read what people are saying you would know that they put cakes in the fridge because they use perishable fillings. Everyone has said that over and over and over. If I use fresh fruit or curds or cream cheese fillings I'm NOT leaving that out on my counter for days whether it's nicely packaged in ganache or not. In the States and Canada people want the option to have more than just ganache filling and mud cake. They want SMBC and cream cheese icing and fresh fruits and lots of other perishable fillings. We have to follow certain health guidelines and those guidelines say we must refrigerate those types of foods if we're selling them to the general public. If a health inspector came in and saw a cake on the counter and you told him that cake had been sitting out for 3 days and was filled with fruit and cream cheese he would toss it in the garbage. THAT is why we're saying that if you use perishable fillings you need to refrigerate.

why is that so hard to understand?

If you're worried about a cake absorbing cardboard smells why aren't you worried about it collecting airborne dust while it sits on your counter? No matter how clean your kitchen is there's going to be dust and hair and lots of other particles floating in the air. I don't want that on my cakes, thanks.




well said

mayo2222 Posted 4 May 2010 , 1:18pm
post #60 of 98

No offense to the OP or anyone else, but is it just me or does this question seem to get asked a lot, again and again. It would be nice to have FAQ sticky or even its own section where topics like this which could be found for quick reference.

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