How Do I Get The Full Layers?

Decorating By KayMc Updated 8 May 2010 , 5:10pm by ginger6361

KayMc Posted 3 May 2010 , 12:23am
post #1 of 39

On all the photos I see of cakes, it appears as if their layers are thicker (higher) than are mine. Are they made with more cake batter in each pan, or is it that there's filling in between the layers????/

38 replies
lisamenz Posted 3 May 2010 , 12:36am
post #2 of 39

I get really nice layers of full cake, by adding several things, depending on what flavor the client is asking for . You can add Swan's flour to your cake mixes. It really makes them fluffy and full and light. You can add dream whip to your mixes, etc . this is just a few of the many things you can do to help. Just really study your receipe ingredients., Know what ingredients do to the cake. Its just like learning the art of the outside of the cake, study the inside techniques and tricks for the that also. Hope this helps. icon_lol.gif

P.s. baking and oven temps can also help too.

mbark Posted 3 May 2010 , 12:47am
post #3 of 39

yes, probably the higher layers are going to be 4 layers of cake (2 regular cakes torted) and 3 layers of filling. that's what I like to use when I need a taller cake. Otherwise I use 2 layers with a filling in the middle.

2SchnauzerLady Posted 3 May 2010 , 12:50am
post #4 of 39

Kaymic: do your cake edges come up to the top edge of the pan once baked? If not, add more batter.

DianeLM Posted 3 May 2010 , 12:54am
post #5 of 39

KayMc - Are you using serious cake pans, like Wilton? Or are you using the grocery store style pans, like Ecko, that are only 1-1/2 inch high?

And, yes, if your finished cakes are not rising to the height of your cake pan or even higher, put more batter in.

Mug-a-Bug Posted 3 May 2010 , 1:05am
post #6 of 39

You should be using two 2 inch pans with a filling. OR two 2 inch pans with a filling in the middle PLUS a filling between each cake (torted and filled). The later will give you extra height. I use just one layer of filling because I'm lazy and don't have a need for excessively tall cakes. HTH icon_rolleyes.gif

bwydeli Posted 3 May 2010 , 1:08am
post #7 of 39

we fill ours almost to the top. when it comes out the oven we press it lightly down with a paper towel to help it be more level before we cut it so we don't have to cut so much off when leveling.

costumeczar Posted 3 May 2010 , 11:18am
post #8 of 39

Just an FYI, most Wilton pans aren't QUITE 2" tall, they're all a little shorter than that.

KayMc Posted 4 May 2010 , 1:23am
post #9 of 39

thank you all for your advice! I am using Wilton pans, so I think I need to add more batter. I found it interesting about adding the other ingredients. I never did that.

leah_s Posted 4 May 2010 , 2:41am
post #10 of 39

I have to laugh when I read that Wilton pans are "serious" cake pans.

I knew you were gonna ask, Are you using serious (professional) pans, like Magic Line?

Mug-a-Bug Posted 4 May 2010 , 12:35pm
post #11 of 39

I use wilton pans and have some magic line ones too. I can't really tell a difference. As long as your pans have straight edges, no need to invest in new ones.

ddaigle Posted 4 May 2010 , 12:49pm
post #12 of 39

I hate wilton pans. Magic lines are MAGIC!!!!! They produce the best cakes ever! The only magic lines I can get locally are qtr and half sheets. I want to toss out every wilton round. I guess I need to order the round magic lines off the itnernet. I get evenly baked tall cake layers with magic line and I get a headache when I bake with wilton pans.

leah_s Posted 4 May 2010 , 12:50pm
post #13 of 39

ditto, ddaigle. Magic Line pans rock!

DianeLM Posted 4 May 2010 , 1:03pm
post #14 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by leah_s

I have to laugh when I read that Wilton pans are "serious" cake pans.

I knew you were gonna ask, Are you using serious (professional) pans, like Magic Line?




Hehe... I laughed when I typed it. But I couldn't think of another way to distinguish Wilton pans from grocery store pans.

Magic Line pans all the way, baby!!

KayMc Posted 4 May 2010 , 1:11pm
post #15 of 39

OK - as a newbie, I'm listening. What do the wilton pans NOT do, that the Magic Line pans DO do? Or vice versa? Shall I invest in the Magic Line, and why?

Sassy74 Posted 4 May 2010 , 1:31pm
post #16 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by KayMc

OK - as a newbie, I'm listening. What do the wilton pans NOT do, that the Magic Line pans DO do? Or vice versa? Shall I invest in the Magic Line, and why?





Oh, where to begin lol??? The Magic Lines are better in so many ways...heavier, more durable, sides that are actually STRAIGHT, corners that are actually SQUARE.

Even their round pans are superior. They are also heavier, and just bake better...even crumb, more level edges. Magic Lines are something of an investment, but definitely one that will pay off!

MissRobin Posted 4 May 2010 , 1:34pm
post #17 of 39

I love my magic line pans. I have problems with my cake sinking in the middle if I put too much batter in the pan, anyone else??

leah_s Posted 4 May 2010 , 1:49pm
post #18 of 39

Your Magic Line pans will last as long as you do.

ditto Sassy.

scionmom Posted 4 May 2010 , 1:52pm
post #19 of 39

MissRobin, I have the same problem with certain cakes that I make. I think it has to do with the batter and the amount of sugar in it. The ones I have had it sink is the Lemon and Rootbeer Float cakes that I have made with them not matter how much batter is in them. But I made a chocolate a couple weeks ago with my magic line pans and they came out perfect! I only have one circle but two of the squares and I LOVE them. Cant wait to get more.
As for the OP if you put more batter in the pans try giving it a parchment collar so the batter doesnt run over and it will make your cakes taller and fuller.

KayMc Posted 4 May 2010 , 7:11pm
post #20 of 39

So, do I need to make more batter if I'm using the 2" pans? When I've baked cakes in the past and used the low grocery store pans, a recipe for a two-layer cake was enough for those lower pans. For sake of conversation, if I was using a cake mix, would I need 1.5 cake mixes for using two inch pans? it seems like doubling it would be too much.

carmijok Posted 4 May 2010 , 7:33pm
post #21 of 39

Don't know about Magic Line pans...I'm a Fat Daddio's gal. Sides are straight, corners are square. They're sturdy, solid, and clean up great. I fill almost 2/3rds full to get the full 2 inches. I like having extra to level. More scraps for me! icon_biggrin.gif

tmelrose Posted 4 May 2010 , 7:36pm
post #22 of 39

Glad you're asking these questions KayMc. I'm pretty new at this too. I wondered the same thing for a long time. I think you probably would need 1-1/2 mixes for the pans. I believe pans should be filled with batter up to 3/4 way full. Experts correct me if I'm wrong. For those who have sinking in the middle have you tried the flower nail for the core to help with even heating?

snocilla Posted 4 May 2010 , 8:04pm
post #23 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by KayMc

So, do I need to make more batter if I'm using the 2" pans? When I've baked cakes in the past and used the low grocery store pans, a recipe for a two-layer cake was enough for those lower pans. For sake of conversation, if I was using a cake mix, would I need 1.5 cake mixes for using two inch pans? it seems like doubling it would be too much.




The WASC recipe and variations always work perfect for an 8" round for me. One batch is equivalent to approximately 1 1/2 box mixes.

KayMc Posted 4 May 2010 , 10:43pm
post #24 of 39

So, if I make the recipe for white almond sour cream cake, it will be enough to successfully fill a set of the two 8" two inch tall pans?

southernswthrt Posted 5 May 2010 , 1:42am
post #25 of 39

I'm a newbie too, and of course started off with the basic wilton round pans. When I wanted to expand my collection, I ordered fat daddio rounds and magic line square and rectangle and I have to 100% agree with the others...no more Wilton for me!

My cakes come out more even with a nice crumb. It's a higher grade aluminum...you can tell the difference when you pick up the pan. Just buy one and you'll be convinced.

I use mainly the WASC recipe and fill a little more than half and usually get a full 2" layer.

JaeRodriguez Posted 5 May 2010 , 7:05pm
post #26 of 39

Are you sure your Wilton pans are 2"? I have Wilton pans that are 1.5", that could be your problem?

snocilla Posted 5 May 2010 , 7:07pm
post #27 of 39

I just want to say.. WOW, Jae! 40 weeks and 4 days! I guess it's any day now! I'm so excited for you! icon_smile.gif

snocilla Posted 5 May 2010 , 7:09pm
post #28 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by KayMc

So, if I make the recipe for white almond sour cream cake, it will be enough to successfully fill a set of the two 8" two inch tall pans?




Yes it should be enough.

DanishPastry Posted 7 May 2010 , 4:20am
post #29 of 39

I've liked my Wilton cake pans, but then, I'm not a professional cake decorator - just cakes for family & friends (including my daughter's wedding cake). I use them with the Wilton Bake Even strips, so they bake slower & more evenly - similar to a heavier cake pan. I don't know the structure of the other pans referenced, but the Wilton pans don't have seams so they wash up well.

I also use Wilton's Cake Release, as I've had better luck with the cake releasing cleanly (without crumbly sides) with Cake Release than with other products.

That said, I've tried baking 2" high cake layers, using both the flower nail and the Wilton Bakewear Heating Core, to ensure even baking and haven't been happy with the results. I've also not had good luck torting and don't do enough cakes to invest in an Agbay, but like a little more filling with my cake than you get with a standard cake with two 2" layers. So, I now make 3 layers that are 1 to 1-1/2" thick. I bake them at 325F and find they rise very evenly - no hump - and bake evenly throughout without needing the flower nail/baking core. I love how the tiers turn out and it isn't nearly as stressful for me!!!

KayMc Posted 7 May 2010 , 12:01pm
post #30 of 39

So many good tips! I baked my cake last evening (WASC),and used 2" high pans. The layers were full and gorgeous! I was frantically making the buttercream frosting and applying the crumb coat this morning before starting work. It's now in the fridge, waiting to be decorated. Thanks to everyone for the help you've offered to me!

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