No More Air Trapped Under Fondant!!!

Decorating By vagostino Updated 3 May 2016 , 1:01pm by -K8memphis

vagostino Posted 2 May 2010 , 8:06pm
post #1 of 23

I'm so tired of my cakes bulging with huge air bubbles on the sides that this weekend I tried something new with my cakes, and it worked!!!
I tried it with a huge wedding cake, and two little cakes and it worked in all of them!!!

The only thing different that I did was: after freezing the cakes, I let them come to room temp, ice them and back in the fridge to set. The next day I got them out, immediately cover with fondant and DIDN'T put back in the fridge after that.
Also, Instead of my usual cornstarch I used powdered sugar to roll the fondant. I read somewhere that cornstarch ferments and creates air.

Before I use to keep them in the fridge after covering with fondant, and I use cornstarch instead of Powdered sugar.

I hope this helps someone!!

22 replies
LeanneW Posted 2 May 2010 , 9:17pm
post #2 of 23

I heard that cornstarch is the cause of this. Haven't tried it yet. Glad to hear it worked for you.

tsal Posted 2 May 2010 , 9:27pm
post #3 of 23

I use a thin layer of cornstarch on my work surface when rolling out my fondant and still ended up with air bubbles. I'm still wondering why I can't seem to get it right...

vagostino Posted 2 May 2010 , 9:32pm
post #4 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by tsal

I use a thin layer of cornstarch on my work surface when rolling out my fondant and still ended up with air bubbles. I'm still wondering why I can't seem to get it right...


exactly! the cornstarch seems to be one of the big problems. I'm using powdered sugar now!.

all4cake Posted 2 May 2010 , 9:36pm
post #5 of 23

ferments and creates air????

That just explains a whole lotta goin's on when I used it on my babies' hinies!

weirkd Posted 2 May 2010 , 9:52pm
post #6 of 23

Learn something new every day on here! Thanks for the info! I will try it out next time!

DianeLM Posted 2 May 2010 , 9:58pm
post #7 of 23

You had to know someone was going to come in here and jump into the wrong end of the pool. Might as well be me. icon_smile.gif

I use cornstarch GENEROUSLY when rolling out fondant. I also cover my cakes straight out of a 30-40 minute freeze. Haven't had a bubble in over a year.

I'm glad you found something that works for you. I hope your experience helps other folks. I'm just here to represent the "if it ain't broke, don't fix it" contingent. icon_smile.gif

colleenant Posted 2 May 2010 , 10:03pm
post #8 of 23

I really think it has to do with temperature change, going in and out of the freezer or fridge, then warming up. My bubble happend this weekend - I had the covered cake in the fridge then I took it out to work on it, as I was working on it (warming up) it began to bulge. Also, it only bulged on the tier that had cream cheese icing.

The_Sugar_Fairy Posted 2 May 2010 , 10:20pm
post #9 of 23

I agree with colleenant and DianeLM. I also use cornstarch generously and don't have any problems with air bubbles.
I used to have problems with trapped air and blow outs when I put my cakes in the fridge after covering with fondant then removing to decorate and then putting back in the fridge. So I agree, it probably does have something to do with temperature change (maybe condensation forming under the fondant and it has no where to go). Now I don't put my cakes in the fridge AT ALL after covering with fondant. The only problem with this though, is you can't use perishable fillings.

The_Sugar_Fairy Posted 2 May 2010 , 10:26pm
post #10 of 23

I'm acutally scared to even put my cakes in the freezer for 10 minutes before covering with fondant, although I'd really like to so that the cake and bc is a little harder. Do you all think I'd be able to do this without condensation problems? Does anyone do this just before putting on the fondant and then keep the cake out of the fridge after that?

all4cake Posted 2 May 2010 , 10:28pm
post #11 of 23

maybe the moisture content of the cake/icing?

I've filled with mousse mousse, iced, frozen, covered in fondant, put back in freezer...then, traveled 5 hours in an A/Ced car with them in closed cardboard boxes, placed in refrigerator overnight, removed from fridge to decorate, traveled to venue and assembled...not one bubble...and I use a combination of cs/ps.

The bubble issue changes if I use an oil based formula for the cake and/or a wetter than usual icing...

I'm not saying I've found the cause, just that I no longer believe there's a cure....


edited out sputtering words.

Caths_Cakes Posted 2 May 2010 , 10:31pm
post #12 of 23

I freeze my cakes. they never go in the fridge. i use cornstarch

Ive never had an air bubble :/

Ive heard the cornstarch theory before, but like i said, ive never had a bubble, so its never crossed me as being an issue

DianeLM Posted 2 May 2010 , 10:38pm
post #13 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by The_Sugar_Fairy

I'm acutally scared to even put my cakes in the freezer for 10 minutes before covering with fondant, although I'd really like to so that the cake and bc is a little harder. Do you all think I'd be able to do this without condensation problems? Does anyone do this just before putting on the fondant and then keep the cake out of the fridge after that?



10 minutes? Heck, I leave my cakes in the freezer for 30-40 minutes until the crumb coat is rock hard. Really, only the outer inch of the cake is frozen. The remainder is still room temp.

There will be condensation as the cake thaws, but not very much and not for very long since it's only the outer inch of the cake that needs to thaw.

I keep my cakes at room temp after that. I don't use perishable fillings.

The_Sugar_Fairy Posted 2 May 2010 , 10:43pm
post #14 of 23

I was hoping you'd answer me DianeLM! Your cakes are beautiful! I just added a couple more to my favourites! What you've said makes complete sense to me and I'm going to trust your opinion. I'll try freezing 30 minutes before covering with fondant (your cake would've been at room temperature before putting in the freezer right?). Then I agree; keep it out of the fridge and use non-perishable fillings. Thanks so much!

momma28 Posted 2 May 2010 , 10:55pm
post #15 of 23

I always refrigerate and re refrigerate my cakes, I use cs to roll it out and I have NEVER had an air bubble appear as it sat out. Besides Powdered Sugar has Corn Starch in it, thats what makes it powdered sugar, so if its the cs that is fermenting than it would happen with powdered sugar too.

Maybe its the temperature change issue but Mine are in and out all the time. I only take mine out permanently several hours before delivery so the cake is rooom temp at the time of cutting and serving.

I agree with if aint broke. Whatever works for you is the best way to go

vagostino Posted 2 May 2010 , 11:51pm
post #16 of 23

I just posted this because it's what finally worked for me after trying all other things. I think maybe the combo of not putting the cake back in the fridge after the fondant AND the powdered sugar had something to do in my case. Maybe the condensation underneath the cake makes the cornstarch ferment? I don;t know and I don;t have an explanation.
I just wanted to put it out there for all of the ones that still get the bubbles.
If you don't get them, of course don't change anything!!
Plus, based on your avatar pictures guys, you seem to know much more than me....I'm just contributing my 2 cents!

The_Sugar_Fairy Posted 3 May 2010 , 12:32am
post #17 of 23

I so so appreciate your post vagostino as I've been trying to figure this out for a long time. Thank you! It sounds like it's a combination of things that causes the problem. I so wish we could narrow it down... maybe one day!

DianeLM Posted 3 May 2010 , 12:46am
post #18 of 23

Thank you for the sweet compliments!! icon_redface.gif

Yes, the cake is at room temp before putting in the freezer for 30 minutes.

Here's what my cakes go through from oven to delivery:

Bake, cool completely, level, wrap and freeze.

On filling day, remove cakes from freezer and let thaw at room temp for a few hours. (If it's going to be a big day, take cakes out of freezer the night before.)

Torte and fill layers. Wrap, weight and let settle for at least 3 hours.

If it's a small order, filling and fondant on the same day. If lots of orders, everyone gets filled one day and fondant the next day.

Before fondant, fragile cakes, such as chocolate, as well as carved cakes are unwrapped and sent to the freezer for about 30 minutes. White and other sturdy cakes are just unwrapped and allowed to 'air dry' for a few minutes.

Cakes are given a layer of spackle and smoothed. Back to the freezer for 30-40 minutes depending on their size.

Cakes are removed from freezer and fondant applied. Let condensation evaporate, then decorate.

Ack... I'd add more, but this reply box is jumping around all over the place!

DianeLM Posted 3 May 2010 , 12:50am
post #19 of 23

vagostino - I think it's great that you found a solution to your problem and are able to share. I know when I've had issues - buttercream blowouts, cracked icing, whatever - I always appreciated learning different techniques to try. I think this thread could be a great resource for people who are having fondant problems. Lots of different opinions and techniques to consider. icon_smile.gif

missmersh Posted 16 May 2010 , 5:10am
post #20 of 23

Thank you for sharing your tips!
I do my cakes differently and still get air bubbles, but it has just recently started happening to me. I don't use corn starch or PS...never have, I use shortening and I don't refrigerate or freeze....unless I am carving.

So, I don't think the problem is corn starch, temp change or powdered sugar. Maybe it's either not adhered well to the cake? Or maybe something to do with the fondant? Or maybe air that wasn't pushed out before smoothing? I don't know....

Have any of you noticed that the decorators on tv hardly put any BC underneath their fondant layer? I use fondant because I think it looks better, but my customers like the buttercream, therefore, I sometimes will put alot of BC under my fondant...maybe this is it??? Or maybe the top tiers are causing too much pressure on the lower tiers and causing the fondant to crack and blow out? Anyway, I have NO IDEA what made this just start happening to me. But I wish I could figure it out!! icon_sad.gif

soldiernurse Posted 3 May 2016 , 12:43am
post #21 of 23

You dont fridge after crumbcoat?

kakeladi Posted 3 May 2016 , 2:23am
post #22 of 23

This is a VERY OLD post so noone who posted in it is going to answer you.  

But........I NEVER fridged any of my cakes either before or after crumb coating. and never had problems.   In fact I was taught that fondant needed to go onto a very freshly crumb'd cake in order for the fondant to stick to the cake and prevent blowouts (aka: bulges).

-K8memphis Posted 3 May 2016 , 1:01pm
post #23 of 23

as you can see the only wrong way to do this is the way that doesn't work for you

fridge/freeze/room temp -- powdered sugar/cornstarch/shortening -- yes no maybe so -- baking/caking is a crazy sport --

"one bakers 'never ever do' is the next bakers 'i swear by this"

so you just have to test out what works for you and with my best regards for your sweet success

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