Can You Clarify Doubts On Your Cakes? I'm Italian!!:-)

Baking By krystal0611 Updated 12 May 2010 , 5:05pm by KHalstead

krystal0611 Posted 30 Apr 2010 , 10:22am
post #1 of 15

Hi everyone, I have some doubts about your cakes, I am Italian and here we don't use cover the cake with fondant but only with whipped cream.


You make two kinds of cakeicon_surprised.gifne covered only with frosting and one covered with frosting and fondant over! Is that right?

I want to know: use the same frosting in both cases? Could you give me the recipe? You mean, I once tried to make the buttercream and put it in place of whipped cream under the fondant, but the taste was too tiresome, the taste was too much butter! Your frosting that taste like?

Then you explain the difference between frosting / icing / buttercream and give me the recipe? Thanks

I also have another request: Could you give me the recipe for your basic cake (called sponge cake ... is not it? I see often on the show "cake boss") and chocolate fudge (For "chocolate fudge" i mean the chocolate cream that Buddy Valastro use in the show "cake boss!Or also the vanilla icing that he use...i don't know what is the correct name!)? Thank you! ^ _ ^

Ps Sorry for the grammar but I'm Italian and I don't speak very good English!

14 replies
KHalstead Posted 30 Apr 2010 , 11:58am
post #2 of 15

Speriamo che tu possa capire questo! Una ricetta crema al burro di base è:

Questo è il link alla ricetta di Buddy

http://abcnews.go.com/GMA/recipe?id=7617125

Lei ha ragione che la glassa si utilizza lo stesso sulla torta per se stesso e anche sulla torta sotto il fondente.


Se vai qui: http://translate.google.com/?hl=en&langpair=en|fr # en | it |% 20% 0A% 0A% 20If% 20you% 20go 20here% 3A%

puoi inserire il tuo italiano nativo, e lo hanno tradotto in inglese (potrebbe aiutare con cose più difficili che stai cercando di spiegare)

Hanno un grande giorno! Speriamo che tutto questo è comprensibile

krystal0611 Posted 30 Apr 2010 , 1:28pm
post #3 of 15

Thankyou for the answer!!^_^
I'll try to make those recipes!

So...there aren't differences between frosting / icing / buttercream ,it's right?only the name hehe

And...what about chocolate cream that buddy call "chocolate fudge"?Thanks a lot! icon_biggrin.gif

KHalstead Posted 30 Apr 2010 , 4:13pm
post #4 of 15

Molto probabilmente il "cioccolato fondente" Si riferisce a una ganache al cioccolato fatta di solito con 1 parte di panna e 3 parti di cioccolato.
Non fai altro che riscaldare la vostra crema e versare sopra il cioccolato tritato, lasciare riposare per circa 5 minuti e poi mantecare, otterrà bello e lucido e liscio. Se si lascia riposare, si ferma e diventare come un fudge. Puoi anche frusta e usarlo per decorare con. Io allegare una torta che ho fatto dove ho appena dumping nel corso del dolce, poi lasciate riposare e resi più in un sacchetto di tubazioni per convogliare l 'confini sulla torta.
Glassa, glassa e crema al burro sono tutti la stessa cosa! Buttercream si riferisce al "tipo" di glassa / a velo Speranza che aiuta!
LL

krystal0611 Posted 30 Apr 2010 , 4:31pm
post #5 of 15

I'm sorry...can you write me the last answer in english?Some word (in italian) have a different meaning if you use google translatore and i didn't understand all!Thankyou ^_^

jhay Posted 30 Apr 2010 , 4:32pm
post #6 of 15

Holy cow KHalstead! Bravo!

krystal0611 Posted 30 Apr 2010 , 5:31pm
post #7 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by jhay

Holy cow KHalstead! Bravo!




ahaha which means? icon_lol.gif

KHalstead Posted 30 Apr 2010 , 6:44pm
post #8 of 15

basically, I just said that frosting, icing, and buttercream are all the same thing!

Buttercream is a "type" of frosting/icing.

krystal0611 Posted 30 Apr 2010 , 7:20pm
post #9 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by KHalstead

basically, I just said that frosting, icing, and buttercream are all the same thing!

Buttercream is a "type" of frosting/icing.




Thank you, you've solved a lot of my doubts! icon_biggrin.gif

prterrell Posted 1 May 2010 , 2:34am
post #10 of 15

The buttercream most common in the US is comprised of vegetable fat and icing sugar, sometimes with butter or butter flavoring added.

I would suggest that you use instead a European style buttercream. My favorite is one that is called Italian Meringue buttercream. There are lots of recipes for it in the recipe section of this web site. It is made by whipping egg whites with a sugar syrup cooked to the hard crack stage and then mixing in unsalted (sweet cream) butter and flavorings/extracts. You should be able to get the ingredients for this much easier than the other kind of icing.

This also can be used alone or underneath sugarpaste (fondant) or marzipan (I believe marzipan is more common in Europe as a cake covering than it is in the States).

The typical American cake is not actually a sponge cake, but a butter cake. The usual ingredient ratio is 1 cup butter, 2 cups sugar, 3 cups flour, 4 large eggs (for this reason it is also known as a 1-2-3-4 cake). It also has small amounts of salt, baking powder, a liquid (usually water or milk) and extracts/flavorings in the batter.

I would not rely on the show "The Cake Boss" to be representative of American baking, as that bakery specializes in Italian-American baked goods. The cakes and pastries most common across the US are more from the British tradition, with a little of the French and German styles in higher-end bakeries.

For more about American-style cakes, this website: http://www.joyofbaking.com is very good. Hopefully Google translate can translate it accurately for you.

I hope you are able to understand this long post. I am sorry, but I have no Italian and only a very little (and very poor) French. I think your English was very good, by the way. I am sadly unable to understand some posts written by native English speakers, but yours was very clear.

krystal0611 Posted 2 May 2010 , 2:10pm
post #11 of 15

Thank you, you were very clear and I think I understand everything! The site that you've shown is really fantastic, I think your culture is very fascinating, so I try to inform me often,in the hope one day to visit your country!
Thanks again...Miriam icon_biggrin.gif

Ruth0209 Posted 2 May 2010 , 4:15pm
post #12 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by krystal0611

Quote:
Originally Posted by jhay

Holy cow KHalstead! Bravo!



ahaha which means? icon_lol.gif




Krystal, this is a slang expression of surprise that means:

"I am very impressed. Good job!"

jhay was impressed that KHalstead was able to respond to you in Italian.

JGMB Posted 2 May 2010 , 8:14pm
post #13 of 15

KHalstead, you never cease to amaze me with your wealth of talent -- cakes, cookies, and now Italian!!!!!!

krystal0611 Posted 2 May 2010 , 9:11pm
post #14 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth0209

Quote:
Originally Posted by krystal0611

Quote:
Originally Posted by jhay

Holy cow KHalstead! Bravo!



ahaha which means? icon_lol.gif



Krystal, this is a slang expression of surprise that means:

"I am very impressed. Good job!"

jhay was impressed that KHalstead was able to respond to you in Italian.




ooohh i understand now!thanks icon_biggrin.gif

KHalstead Posted 12 May 2010 , 5:05pm
post #15 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by JGMB

KHalstead, you never cease to amaze me with your wealth of talent -- cakes, cookies, and now Italian!!!!!!





not so impressive, I can't speak a single word of italian! I used Google translate!lol

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