Second Cake Attempt, Uneven Layers, Bump, And Bubbly

Decorating By Alexrn Updated 29 Apr 2010 , 4:16am by Debi2

Alexrn Posted 26 Apr 2010 , 2:43am
post #1 of 13

I am brand new to the world of cakes (have always enjoyed baking them, but new to decorating) so excuse me if I am asking sily questions. My first cake I did I used cake pans I had (which I realize now arent the appropriate ones for making a cake that is even on all sides), and this time I bought some wilton 8" rounds from walmart.

My cakes came out with the dome/poof on top and I when I tried to level them out with a serated knife I just could not get them even, and I noticed the cake inside had tons of holes. I did OK suprisingly with the crumb icing, but still could not manage to get the cake looking even or the edges crisp with my thicker layer of buttercream (I used the viva method). I was planning to try out some fondant but am worried it will just be looking so uneven and horrible I wonder if I shoud try again. Should I have frozen my cakes some and made a better attempt at carving/shaving to get an even/smooth cake? Can you build up the edges at all with the buttercream? I am so lost!

Thanks in advance to anyone who has read this entire message, I appreciate any input!

12 replies
NerdyGirl Posted 26 Apr 2010 , 2:53am
post #2 of 13

I'm new too! I bought a cake leveler (Wilton brand) to level my cakes. I wouldn't even dare try it with a knife.

As for evening out the frosting, I'd be terrible at explaining it (plus, I'm still working on it myself!). My teacher mentioned that it's all in how you hold the spatula.

mbark Posted 26 Apr 2010 , 3:07am
post #3 of 13

Practicing will certainly help with leveling icing, it just takes time to get the hang of it. One thing that helps me is to hold the spatula stationary against the side of the cake to ice it & turn the turn-table so it's even. Same thing for the top.
As far as the dome on the top of the cake, right when it comes out of the oven use a clean dishtowel folded in half & gently press down evenly on the top. I read that somewhere & it works nicely. Also, when you stack the cake put the domed side down so the nice straight side is on top. Hope that helps!
LL

anasazi17 Posted 26 Apr 2010 , 12:31pm
post #4 of 13

Hello!

Here are a couple of tips ... I hope they help icon_smile.gif

The holes in the cake are little air bubbles; tap your pans gently prior to putting them in the oven, you'll see the air bubble rise to the top and pop. Also, they could be from under or over mixing.

Leveling used to be a huge struggle for me too. There are several tutorials on youtube and CC that can help.
HTH

Jenny

anasazi17 Posted 26 Apr 2010 , 12:34pm
post #5 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by anasazi17

Hello!

Here are a couple of tips ... I hope they help icon_smile.gif

The holes in the cake are little air bubbles; tap your pans gently prior to putting them in the oven, you'll see the air bubble rise to the top and pop. Also, they could be from under or over mixing.

Leveling used to be a huge struggle for me too. There are several tutorials on youtube and CC that can help.
HTH

Jenny




Here are some fantastic tutorials:
http://cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-654103.html

Rachie204 Posted 26 Apr 2010 , 12:49pm
post #6 of 13

i like to overfill my cake pan a little that way when they come out of the oven i am able to just slide the knife across the pan leaving a perfectly level cake....then after a few minutes of cooling you can take the cake out of the pan and use the bottom side up if you want.

Check out Edna's you tube video "How to ice a cake my way" (i think that is what it is called...it helped me a lot)

online_annie Posted 26 Apr 2010 , 1:17pm
post #7 of 13

I use bake even strips around my pans while baking...No More Humps. The holes are from air bubbles that are trapped. I also tap and drop my pans on the counters several times to get them to rise to the surface. Pop the the stubborn ones with a toothpick. I cook them low and slow to ensure an even rise. Also...I get a level out and level my oven every other month. I not only check the top of the oven, but also the inside racks, front, back and both sides to ensure everything stays level. Most ovens have adjustable feet like washers. This goes a long way in creating a level cake. Should a cake need leveling, use a cake leveler. Beginners may want to use the wilton leveler. It's good not only for leveling the top, but also for torting the layers.

Alexrn Posted 26 Apr 2010 , 2:44pm
post #8 of 13

Thank you all so much for the great suggestions, I really appreciate it! I never thought about using the bottom of the cake (in the pan) as the top of the cake when icing/decorating. I just love this forum, full of tons of helpful people!

Debi2 Posted 29 Apr 2010 , 3:28am
post #9 of 13

Great tip Rachie204! I can't wait to try your method of overfilling and using the pan as a guide for leveling! Very smart! icon_biggrin.gif

Rachie204 Posted 29 Apr 2010 , 3:30am
post #10 of 13

thanks Debi2... I learned it here on CC of course! icon_smile.gif

crp7 Posted 29 Apr 2010 , 3:55am
post #11 of 13

I used to have holes in my cake even after tapping the pan and trying to get the bubbles out. If you use a cake mix, I have started sifting my mix before preparing it. This took care of the holes in the cake.

Debi2 Posted 29 Apr 2010 , 4:15am
post #12 of 13

Yep Rachie204, this place is a goldmine of information! icon_biggrin.gif Love it!

Debi2 Posted 29 Apr 2010 , 4:16am
post #13 of 13

Yep Rachie204, this place is a goldmine of information! icon_biggrin.gif Love it!

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