Two Tiered Cheesecake?

Decorating By katystinykitchen Updated 19 Aug 2013 , 1:41pm by kikiandkyle

katystinykitchen Posted 23 Apr 2010 , 10:57pm
post #1 of 28

I have a request for a wedding cake and we have been tossing around ideas when she suggested on doing a two tiered cheesecake since her and her fiance don't like cake... Is this possible? I have never made a cheesecake for a wedding, let alone stacked them. Do you price cheesecake the same per slice as regular cake? TIA!

27 replies
leily Posted 24 Apr 2010 , 1:59am
post #2 of 28

I haven't made cheesecake in forever, but you'll have to run the cost of your supplies/materials to find out if you can charge the same price per serving for cheesecake as you do cake.

As for stacking, no different than a tiered cake, use boards and supports icon_smile.gif

Edited for gramical errors

confectionsofahousewife Posted 24 Apr 2010 , 2:09am
post #3 of 28

I've also read about covering it in fondant so it looks more like a wedding cake, than cheesecake! (I am no help on price but I agree with pp on just figuring your ingredients on cheesecake and going from there).

motherofgrace Posted 24 Apr 2010 , 2:14am
post #4 of 28

cant wait to hear this, my hubby would love that!

costumeczar Posted 24 Apr 2010 , 2:23am
post #5 of 28

I do tiered cheesecakes and they're no different form regular cakes in the building process, but you have to refrigerate them and they can't sit out as long as a regular cake. Also if the wedding is in the summer I'd say forget it, cheesecake and heat are not friends.

nwnest Posted 24 Apr 2010 , 2:24am
post #6 of 28

Cheesecake is way more expensive than cake-cake. I would be really interested to see a wedding cheesecake. Sounds like a nifty challenge.

kdejoyfulnoise Posted 24 Apr 2010 , 2:26am
post #7 of 28

I made an all cheesecake wedding cake for a friend of mine. The bottom tier was 16" round double stacked. The 2nd tier was 12" round double stacked and the top was an 8 single layer. If you stack just bake the 2nd layer without a crust. Be sure that you freeze the layer you are going to stack on before stacking. Cook the layers longer than it says...most recipe's state you are to take the cake out when just set but I found out you could not stack on this type of cake. Let me know if you have any questions. Good luck

costumeczar Posted 24 Apr 2010 , 3:12am
post #8 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by kdejoyfulnoise

I made an all cheesecake wedding cake for a friend of mine. The bottom tier was 16" round double stacked. The 2nd tier was 12" round double stacked and the top was an 8 single layer. If you stack just bake the 2nd layer without a crust. Be sure that you freeze the layer you are going to stack on before stacking. Cook the layers longer than it says...most recipe's state you are to take the cake out when just set but I found out you could not stack on this type of cake. Let me know if you have any questions. Good luck




That's exactly how I do mine. I also use meringue buttercreams instead of shortening-based ones becasue they stick to the cheesecakes better.

cakeschmake Posted 24 Apr 2010 , 3:27am
post #9 of 28

I've done one also. I stacked a 14, 12 and 10 tiers that were about 2 inches tall each. Those were covered in ganache but I've covered single tiers in buttercream. It is the mosaic tile Tennessee cake in my photos, orange and white fondant on chocolate gananche.
They are much heavier that regular cake tiers, and cost more to make as far as my ingredients went.
I agree about the freezing issue, it keeps the cheesecake very stable when stacking.

cupcakeatheart Posted 25 Apr 2010 , 12:34am
post #10 of 28

That sounds really good...anyone got pictures?

cakeschmake Posted 25 Apr 2010 , 12:53am
post #11 of 28

Here is a pic of the one I did
LL

costumeczar Posted 25 Apr 2010 , 2:23am
post #12 of 28

This is the only picture I can find that I know for sure was all cheesecake...I've done a lot of cakes that had one tier of cheesecake and the other tiers regular cake, but I can't remember which ones they were.
LL

cupcakeatheart Posted 25 Apr 2010 , 1:33pm
post #13 of 28

Those are beautiful!!

Costumeczar- are those 4" tiers?

DianeLM Posted 25 Apr 2010 , 2:35pm
post #14 of 28
costumeczar Posted 25 Apr 2010 , 5:39pm
post #15 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by cupcakeatheart

Those are beautiful!!

Costumeczar- are those 4" tiers?




They're probably about 3 to 3 1/2". I stack two cheesecake layers for each tier, but they tend to shrink when they cool off so they're not 2" tall to begin with.

sweettoothmom1 Posted 21 Jul 2010 , 8:07pm
post #16 of 28

costumeczar: more on the cheesecakes... i understand that some brands of fondant do better in the fridge. any suggestions ? if fondant, do you put crumbcoat of buttercream just as we would for any other cake? TIA

Charmed Posted 21 Jul 2010 , 8:28pm
post #17 of 28

I am a little bit confused about cheesecakes. Is it cream cheese cake like new york style cheese cake or a regular cake that has cream cheese in it? I can't imagine stacking a cream cheese cake.

sechrestloans Posted 21 Jul 2010 , 8:52pm
post #18 of 28

thanks to all the great advice on this forum, I too am going to attempt my first 3 tiered cheesecake wedding cake in october. It is exciting to see how it will turn out. I am getting ready to do a trial run in about a week here, good luck and post pics and how it turns out!

mccorda Posted 21 Jul 2010 , 9:24pm
post #19 of 28

I have some pictures of cheesecake wedding cakes in my photos. I frost them with a white chocolate/creamcheese frosting. They were a big hit.

costumeczar Posted 21 Jul 2010 , 9:28pm
post #20 of 28

I make my own fondant, it works fine, but I wouldn't bother putting fondant on a cheesecake. I use IMBC on them for icing, and the filling between the two layers of cheesecake. I use a firmer cheesecake recipe, not something really soft, and I don't do them in the summer!

sweettoothmom1 Posted 21 Jul 2010 , 10:12pm
post #21 of 28

then refrigerate till a few minutes before serving? how long can your masterpiece sit out?

costumeczar Posted 21 Jul 2010 , 11:59pm
post #22 of 28

Not as long as a regular cake, or it will be mushy by the time it's cut. It doesn't have to stay in the fridge until a few minutes before it's cut, though, that's a little on the extreme side. You have to be the judge of how long it can sit out based on the temp in the room, etc.

SweetHeather Posted 22 Jul 2010 , 12:10am
post #23 of 28

Costumeczar, would you be willing to share your recipe for the firmer cheesecake? I am interested in trying to stack some!

SweetHeather Posted 22 Jul 2010 , 12:12am
post #24 of 28

Also, anyone willing to share what their prices are on cheesecake servings? Are the serving sizes the same as regular cakes...1x2x4?

costumeczar Posted 22 Jul 2010 , 10:56am
post #25 of 28

I don't give out my recipes, it's a professional thing, sorry. I just use a basic cheesecake recipe, though. When I said ti's the firmer recipe I meant that it's the firmer type of cheesecake as opposed to the ricotta-types, which are lighter.

LaurasBoutique Posted 19 Aug 2013 , 8:43am
post #26 of 28

What recipes would you suggest for your cheesecakes?  I am just kind of scared of making it too fragile...

LaurasBoutique Posted 19 Aug 2013 , 8:47am
post #27 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by DianeLM 

These are ALL cheesecakes! http://elegantcheesecakes.com/ECC_WeddingGallery_001_1.asp

 

These cheesecakes look AMAZING!!!!  I love the internal tiering and playing with flavours on your flavours page, /flavors

 

What recipes would you suggest for your cheesecakes?  I am just kind of scared of making it too fragile...

kikiandkyle Posted 19 Aug 2013 , 1:41pm
post #28 of 28

AI use a Martha Stewart recipe when I make cheesecake normally, I haven't used it to stack but it's pretty firm.

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