Will Piping Gel Break Down Royal Icing?

Decorating By stephilde Updated 27 Apr 2010 , 11:54pm by BlakesCakes

stephilde Posted 22 Apr 2010 , 5:46pm
post #1 of 20

I know it is going to sound weird but i was thinking of doing a piping gel transfer and then trace it with royal icing instead of buttercream. Will this work? I know the fats in buttercream make the royal icing break down, will that happen with piping gel? Thanks!

19 replies
TexasSugar Posted 22 Apr 2010 , 6:24pm
post #2 of 20

Nope, you can add buttercream into royal.

It isn't the fats that break it down, after it is made, it is the moisture in the icing.

iamcakin Posted 22 Apr 2010 , 8:00pm
post #3 of 20

icon_confused.gif I interesting...all this time I thought it was the fat, too!
I wonder why then all RI instructions state "grease-free" utensils?

Learn something new everyday here icon_smile.gif

TexasSugar Posted 22 Apr 2010 , 8:14pm
post #4 of 20

When making royal icing you can not have any grease get into it or the egg whites (merignue powder) will not whip up properly. Once made though that is a different story.

Last summer I did the black and pink cake in my photos. I rubbed every tier down with crisco because they were dull from the powder sugar I rolled the fondant out on. Each tier had a good coat of crisco on it. I pipped royal icing on and it is still there, even now. It did not desolve, melt or run. It dried rock hard as it normally does.

When I took Course 3 years ago we taped wax paper to the back of the flower formers and spread crisco over the wax paper then piped some royal icing hearts on them. Again they dried hard, the cirsco was there to help them release easier.

In Course 3 now we actually add piping gel to the Lilies to help them pipe with a prettier point. And they dry just fine.

I fully believe that the softening of the royal icing and color flow comes form the moisture in the icing (remember moisture will melt royal icing) rather than the actual grease. We are just taught to be so careful about how we make it that we have become scared to get 'fat' anywhere near it. If it wasn't meant to actually go on cakes, people would have stopped using it years ago.

stephilde Posted 22 Apr 2010 , 10:31pm
post #5 of 20

so do you think piping gel will melt it then? Its pretty moist

BlakesCakes Posted 23 Apr 2010 , 1:55am
post #6 of 20

Yes, I think that piping gel will "melt" the royal icing because of the high moisture content in the gel.

As for the fat vs. moisture issue with buttercream, etc. I think that you have the most destruction of royal when you have a moist (non crusting) icing in contact with fresh royal. In that instance, you have no barriers between the 2 and the breakdown is pretty quick.

Royal on a bit of crisco on wax paper or fondant doesn't have this issue--there's no moisture exchange. But, if there's a LOT of fat, there's also moisture in the fat, so, you get a mess.

The issue of no fat near royal when making it has more to do with the fact that you're making a meringue and meringues won't beat up properly in the presence of fat. Meringues will also deflate once whipped if fat is introduced.

HTH
Rae

TexasSugar Posted 23 Apr 2010 , 6:00pm
post #7 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by stephilde

so do you think piping gel will melt it then? Its pretty moist




I've been teaching Wilton classes for 6 years. My students have been adding piping gel to the royal icing when making lilies all those years. Their flowers did not melt. They dried hard, just like they were suppose to.

If you took a dried flower and set it on the piping gel I'm not sure what would happen, but you can add it into the royal with out a problem.

Rosie2 Posted 23 Apr 2010 , 6:23pm
post #8 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasSugar

When making royal icing you can not have any grease get into it or the egg whites (merignue powder) will not whip up properly. Once made though that is a different story.

Last summer I did the black and pink cake in my photos. I rubbed every tier down with crisco because they were dull from the powder sugar I rolled the fondant out on. Each tier had a good coat of crisco on it. I pipped royal icing on and it is still there, even now. It did not desolve, melt or run. It dried rock hard as it normally does.

When I took Course 3 years ago we taped wax paper to the back of the flower formers and spread crisco over the wax paper then piped some royal icing hearts on them. Again they dried hard, the cirsco was there to help them release easier.

In Course 3 now we actually add piping gel to the Lilies to help them pipe with a prettier point. And they dry just fine.

I fully believe that the softening of the royal icing and color flow comes form the moisture in the icing (remember moisture will melt royal icing) rather than the actual grease. We are just taught to be so careful about how we make it that we have become scared to get 'fat' anywhere near it. If it wasn't meant to actually go on cakes, people would have stopped using it years ago.


TexasSugar, you rock!! this is like taking a class thumbs_up.gif Thank youuuuu icon_smile.gif

TexasSugar Posted 23 Apr 2010 , 6:50pm
post #9 of 20

Glad I could help!

stephilde Posted 23 Apr 2010 , 8:37pm
post #10 of 20

great I am going to try it! THanks!!

motherofgrace Posted 23 Apr 2010 , 8:57pm
post #11 of 20

how do you htink it will do with GLACE? Beacues I want to make sunglasses, and thought piping gel would look cute

TexasSugar Posted 26 Apr 2010 , 2:26pm
post #12 of 20

I'm not sure what you mean by a glaze?

motherofgrace Posted 26 Apr 2010 , 4:02pm
post #13 of 20

you know, cookie glace?

TexasSugar Posted 26 Apr 2010 , 4:20pm
post #14 of 20

Do you mean can you do the techinique with cookie glaze? If so I'm not sure. I haven't used it much so I don't know if it is going to dry hard enough to come off the backing in once piece. Now if you wanted to just outline the image on the cake and fill it in with cookie glaze I can't see why that wouldn't work.

There use to be a techinique though you don't see alot of it any more (or I don't) where you outlined in buttercream then used powder sugar, corn syrup and maybe water to make a pourable mixture to fill in areas. I want to say it formed a skin, was still easy to cut through but didn't dry hard or firm like color flow/royal icing would be. It was refered to as run-in-sugar I believe.

cncsmom45 Posted 27 Apr 2010 , 5:45pm
post #15 of 20

What ratio of gel to royal icing should you use? And is this used just for lillies? TIA!

cncsmom45 Posted 27 Apr 2010 , 5:46pm
post #16 of 20

What ratio of gel to royal icing should you use? And is this used just for lillies? TIA!

TexasSugar Posted 27 Apr 2010 , 5:50pm
post #17 of 20

I believe, off the top of my head, it is 1/4th of a teaspoon piping gel to a 1/2 cup royal icing. We use it for the lillies in class as it is suppose to help form the pretty points to the flower petals.

I don't see why you couldn't use it for other techinques, though if I was doing something like a royal icing/color flow transfer I'd go with straight icing..

Denisedelights Posted 27 Apr 2010 , 8:03pm
post #18 of 20

I have a question. I am doing a dora Color flow and want to lay it on the cake. How do i provent it from NOT breaking down?

TexasSugar Posted 27 Apr 2010 , 8:13pm
post #19 of 20

I have put color flow pieces straight on a cake many of times with no problems at all.

Are you covering the cake in an air tight container or putting it in the fridge?

BlakesCakes Posted 27 Apr 2010 , 11:54pm
post #20 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Denisedelights

I have a question. I am doing a dora Color flow and want to lay it on the cake. How do i provent it from NOT breaking down?




I was taught in my Wilton classes to press a few mini marshmallows, sugar cubes, or balls of fondant into the cake (so that they stand up just a fraction of an inch above the buttercream) and to then place the color flow piece on it.

The thicker parts of the piece would take quite awhile to show the effects of being directly on the buttercream, but the thinner edges can get raggedy pretty quickly.

HTH
Rae

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