Need Help With Box Mix And Cake Size

Baking By lrlt2000 Updated 23 Apr 2010 , 1:30pm by TexasSugar

lrlt2000 Posted 22 Apr 2010 , 1:09pm
post #1 of 16

I am making my daughter's 1st Communion cake this weekend. It will be a two-tier, square, using a 10x10 pan for the bottom and an 8x8 for the top. I want each tier to be 4", and the pans I have are 2" depth.

Each of the box mixes state that they make a 2-layer 9" cake. How many boxes would I need to make mine!? I'm assuming I'd need to fill each pan twice, because even though I will torte and fill, these are only 2" pans. My experience with this is that there always seems to be less batter than you expect when you pour into your pans!

Anyone have any idea how I can figure this out!? I'd like to mix enough batter to fill the 8x8 and 10x10 to bake at the same time, so I don't have batter sitting waiting, or wasting. Would that be two box mixes? So twice that, 4?

15 replies
leily Posted 22 Apr 2010 , 1:17pm
post #2 of 16

How many box mixes will depend on the brand you're using and if you are modifying it at all. Each brand (and sometimes flavor in each brand) makes a different amount of batter. When the boxes say they make 9" cake, that isn't necessarily a 2" tall cake.

I always go by batter amount instead of what the box says. I use DH and add a box of pudding to it with an extra egg and get 5-1/2 to 6 cups out of the flavors I use.

Here is a guide on how much batter you need for each pan.
http://www.wilton.com/cakes/making-cakes/baking-wedding-cake-2-inch-pans.cfm So for an 8" and 10" square it looks like you need a total of 18 cups of batter (4 cups for each layer of 8" and 5 cups for each layer of 10") so using the DH with the pudding i mentioned above you would need a total of 3 boxes of cake mix, this will be cutting it close, but by the time you torte, fill , and ice you will be at 4" tall tiers. If you are using PB or BC i believe these make a little less so you would need 4 boxes of cake mix.

IF you want each tier to be 4" tall then yes, you will need to make 2 layers of each size of cake.

adamsmom Posted 22 Apr 2010 , 1:19pm
post #3 of 16

Wilton has a link to how many cups of batter you will need for each size pan. They also show an estimate of how many cups of icing it will take to frost a 2-layer cake that size and servings it will make. Here's the link: http://www.wilton.com/cakes/making-cakes/baking-wedding-cake-2-inch-pans.cfm
Hope this helps!

TexasSugar Posted 22 Apr 2010 , 1:37pm
post #4 of 16

Philsbury and Better Crocker make between 4-5 cups of batter. DH usually is between 5-6, but it varies on the flavors as well. In my experince white cakes are usually on the lower end, chocolate cakes fall in the middle and the only DH I have find that makes a full 6 cups of batter is the Golden Butter Recipe.

They above gave you a great link to use and save for the future. If you want a full 2in layer cake use that, and forget what the back of the box says, that information is more for the home baker that isn't worried about nice tall layers.

I would use 4 cake mixes myself. Startng with the 8in squares, and saving the extra batter to go in the 10 in.

You can also look into using the extender recipes, which bulk up your batter a little bit more too.

lrlt2000 Posted 22 Apr 2010 , 2:05pm
post #5 of 16

Thank you ALL! I am planning on using the DH German Chocolate mixes, altered a little to make them red velvet (not sure if I'm using just dye, or a mix of dye and beet powder--which tastes yucky on its own to color). To do this, you do alter the recipe a bit, per the DH website. Maybe I'll do 4 boxes, and err on the side of having some to waste.

On the pudding mix to add--do you think I could add vanilla mix to the German chocolate box mix? I wanted it to be a little lighter than it is, so I thought if I added vanilla, as opposed to choclate pudding mix, it might lighten it up a bit? So, **leily**, you just add one whole egg per box of pudding mix you add, and that's the only alteration for that part I need? What if the mix is already a "Supermoist"--do you still add the pudding?

leily Posted 22 Apr 2010 , 2:42pm
post #6 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by lrlt2000

So, **leily**, you just add one whole egg per box of pudding mix you add, and that's the only alteration for that part I need? What if the mix is already a "Supermoist"--do you still add the pudding?




There are a lot of variations that people do with the pudding, but yes I add a box of pudding and one whole egg (in addition to the regular ingredients it calls for) I know some people change the oil/water amount too, but I never have. I personally still add the pudding even if it says it has it already or says "supermoist"

As for the alterations to the cake mix to make RV, I have never done that, i know there was recently a RV topic about using cake mixes, hopefully someone will see this that can send you in the right direction, otherwise might want to check out the topics in the recipe forum, it may be there.

tiggy2 Posted 22 Apr 2010 , 2:58pm
post #7 of 16

If you want a really good red velvet I would use sarah's recipe tweeked on this site. Better then any box mix,moist and easy to make.

Dolledupcakes Posted 22 Apr 2010 , 3:10pm
post #8 of 16

for 10" square pan, you will need 1.5 boxes. So you will need a total of 3 for your bottom tier(to make it 4"). Top tier 8" you will need 1 box per layer (to make it 4"). Make any sense? I figured this out when I used box mixes. And this is with Betty Crocker.

TexasSugar Posted 22 Apr 2010 , 3:49pm
post #9 of 16

DH makes (last time I measured) atleast 5 cups, so really one cake mix should be enough for the 10 in layer. She won't need all of one cake mix for the 8in layer, so she can use the left over to boost up the 10in.

Dolledupcakes Posted 22 Apr 2010 , 4:07pm
post #10 of 16

Yeah if she uses Duncan. I was referring to Betty though icon_smile.gif

TheCakeJeannie Posted 22 Apr 2010 , 10:05pm
post #11 of 16

Hi, I'm also making a 2-tier (10" and 8" square cakes). I used DH butter recipe yellow cakes and the 10" ones seem to BURN on the bottoms and edges, ugh! I had the oven at 350, timed it, and took out when a toothpick in the middle was clean. I even made another one using the 3d instructions on CC but it shriveled up with a mound in the center! Could it be the cake mix (butter recipe) or do I need special changes for square pans?????!! Any ideas?

Dolledupcakes Posted 22 Apr 2010 , 10:38pm
post #12 of 16

Are you using the core for the 10"?

lrlt2000 Posted 23 Apr 2010 , 12:47am
post #13 of 16

Oooh, didn't think about the core--I may have to use one, as I will probably fill the pan to bake. Thanks for the tip!

TheCakeJeannie Posted 23 Apr 2010 , 3:31am
post #14 of 16

Awww, I didn't even think about the core. I use it all the time for the 10" round but didn't realize the square would need it. lrlt, let me know how your 10" cake comes out. Have you used the big square before? I'm going to try again in the morning.

AnotherCreation Posted 23 Apr 2010 , 3:36am
post #15 of 16

HATE the core.....flower nail is much easier!!!! Anytime I use the DH Butter recipe I bake at 325 and I haven't had any problems.

TexasSugar Posted 23 Apr 2010 , 1:30pm
post #16 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Naturenut

I used DH butter recipe yellow cakes and the 10" ones seem to BURN on the bottoms and edges, ugh! I had the oven at 350, timed it, and took out when a toothpick in the middle was clean. I even made another one using the 3d instructions on CC but it shriveled up with a mound in the center! Could it be the cake mix (butter recipe) or do I need special changes for square pans?????!! Any ideas?




I bake everything at 325. I also use the bake even strips and the upside down flower nail for almost every cake.

The DH Butter Recipe is a weird one, it always seems to sink when baked in teh 8x3in pan. But I do like the flavor of it.

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