vick47 Posted 22 Apr 2010 , 12:14pm
post #1 of

After making my 2 tier fondant cake, I transported it to the shower and it didn't look as good as it did at home. It looked as if someone sqeezed down on it (does that make sense?) The filling from the layers seemed to be poking out from the fondant. I used BC frosting without shortening, I'm wondering if that had anything to do with it... The good thing is that they loved the cake and didn't notice the same thing I did.....help!

42 replies
ShanB Posted 22 Apr 2010 , 12:25pm
post #2 of

did you let the cake rest before you put the fondant on? I find my cakes need time to settle before I can put fondant on.

vick47 Posted 22 Apr 2010 , 12:49pm
post #3 of

How long do you let it rest?

leah_s Posted 22 Apr 2010 , 12:53pm
post #4 of

Cakes need 2-3 hours to settle if you use a weighting technique and 12-24 hours without weight. That's before you can frost them or put fondant on.

dalis4joe Posted 22 Apr 2010 , 1:02pm
post #5 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by leah_s

Cakes need 2-3 hours to settle if you use a weighting technique and 12-24 hours without weight. That's before you can frost them or put fondant on.


Yeap!!

vick47 Posted 22 Apr 2010 , 1:43pm
post #6 of

That's my problem....I layered, filled & crumb coated the cake, then put it in the fridge for only about 20 minutes. Thank you ladies! I'm new at all this.

ChoueiriCakeCo Posted 23 Apr 2010 , 11:52pm
post #7 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by leah_s

Cakes need 2-3 hours to settle if you use a weighting technique and 12-24 hours without weight. That's before you can frost them or put fondant on.




Thank you for this tip, I've been wondering exactly how long cakes need to rest. I tend to have little patience when it comes to waiting for cakes to "settle", after a few hours i'm dying to frost them!

costumeczar Posted 24 Apr 2010 , 2:27am
post #8 of

Are you talking about letting them sit after being filled and crumb coated? Or just the time from when you take them out of the oven? I fill, crumb coat and ice my cooled cakes and don't do any kind of "settling time" in between. Let alone let them sit for 24 hours, what the heck?

Tclanton Posted 3 May 2010 , 4:00pm
post #9 of

I always let mine sit over night. Sometimes it could be about 24 hours before I begin the crumb coat. In doing this, I havent ran into an issue yet. Like all have said before, we learn as we go. I learned this weekend to not trust a leveler to retain its settings. I am about ready to get a new one that is more trustworthy.

Trina36 Posted 4 May 2010 , 1:28am

I bake my cake way in advance because i usually have so many orders, that i can afford to wait until a day before to back. I let my cakes cool completely, wrap them tightly in plastic wrap and then freeze them until the night before i'm ready to decorate the cake. At times, the cake is fine, there are times when it starts to bubble. I usually don't get smooth sides (btw i use MMF). For this instance, where do i start timing the settling time, after i bake and before i wrap and freeze or when i take out to thaw?

leah_s Posted 4 May 2010 , 2:44am

Here's what I do:
Bake
Cool
Torte
Wrap
Freeze
Pull out of freezer
Thaw briefly
Wash
Fill
Re-wrap
Weight the top with a ceramic tile
Let sit 2-3 hours, up to 24 hours
Crumb coat/immediately ice.
Decorate

Trina36 Posted 4 May 2010 , 2:58am

I don't torte my cakes, i would bake 2-2'' inch cakes and then stack them. does torting make a difference. also what do you mean by Wash?

Thanks for sharing your steps, i'll try yours and see how things go for me.

metria Posted 4 May 2010 , 3:15am

forgive me, could you explain the "Wash" step?

costumeczar Posted 4 May 2010 , 12:18pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by metria

forgive me, could you explain the "Wash" step?




Ha ha, I was confused about that one too, before I realized that she probably means apply a sugar syrup wash to the cake.

leah_s Posted 4 May 2010 , 12:28pm

EXactly. Wash is the term for applying the simple syrup to the cake.

I know I used that term with people who didn't understand cake a few years ago and someone else jumped in and said "That does not mean 'put the cake layer in the dishwasher'. lol

Debcent Posted 4 May 2010 , 12:37pm

Is a wash really neccesary? i never heard of this??? Sorry I know this is a dumb question

leah_s Posted 4 May 2010 , 12:38pm

Well, my chef instructor in culinary school thought so.

costumeczar Posted 4 May 2010 , 12:48pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by Debcent

Is a wash really neccesary? i never heard of this??? Sorry I know this is a dumb question




Even if the cake doesn't NEED it, it can add flavors to the cake if you want to use a flavored syrup. I use a wash on some cakes but not on all of them, but it does give a nice depth to the taste of the cake to layer flavors.

Cake-O-Rate Posted 4 May 2010 , 1:19pm

When working with layered and stacked cakes, you should really consider using professional cake decorators icing recipes' or formulas. If you are layering with fruit type fillings... Keep in mind that the slur from the fruit likes run. Be sure to put a good border of buttercream to hold in your filling. Once you have your cake filled, dirty ice or (crumb ice your cake) Freeze after the crumb ice. After the crumb iced cake has had time to set, ice with one more layer of the butter cream and let it set again. Be sure to remove any condensation that may have developed on your icing. To do this, simply take your spatula and lightly run any condensation from the icing....Now you are ready to put put your fondant or any layer such as ganache. The structure and build of your cake should have a strong foundation to keep it sturdy during transportation.

Did you use a cake board and legs to stack?

Hope this helps!

Rhonda19 Posted 4 May 2010 , 3:59pm

Doesn't it make your cake tough, if you freeze it?

leah_s Posted 4 May 2010 , 4:01pm

hahaha, no freezing makes the cakes moister. Geez where's you get the ideas that freezing makes cakes tough? What the heck is a tough cake anyway?

costumeczar Posted 4 May 2010 , 4:44pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by leah_s

hahaha, no freezing makes the cakes moister. Geez where's you get the ideas that freezing makes cakes tough? What the heck is a tough cake anyway?




If you made it with bread flour it would be tough! I don't freeze anything at all, so you don't have to freeze.

Cake-O-Rate Posted 4 May 2010 , 5:10pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by costumeczar

Quote:
Originally Posted by leah_s

hahaha, no freezing makes the cakes moister. Geez where's you get the ideas that freezing makes cakes tough? What the heck is a tough cake anyway?



If you made it with bread flour it would be tough! I don't freeze anything at all, so you don't have to freeze.


You do not HAVE to freeze the cake, you can refrigerate it if you like. I personally like freezing the layers. It does not dehydrate your layers unless you leave them in for a really long time. Like a few months left uncovered.

They are easier to work with especially if you are carving them. It also assists in keeping your crumb factor under control. The only time you will have an issue with freezing is if you freeze after the product is completely finished. That could result in the icing cracking.

Not freezing large layers or sheets will give you a lot of headache along with the cake possibly falling apart when creating layers to be filled. Unless you use cardboard to separate cut layers of larger size. Even then, you will be risking cracks and separation in your product.

Refrigerate after your art is complete.... icon_smile.gif

The_Sugar_Fairy Posted 4 May 2010 , 5:21pm

Thanks for the tip about using a ceramic tile! I've always let my cakes settle after filling (before crumb coating) but probably not long enough. I'll try the ceramic tile this week. I learned about having the cake settle after filling from Sharon Zambito's DVDs (excellent by the way). Also, be sure to use a very stiff buttercream as a dam and put your filling inside.

Rhonda19 Posted 4 May 2010 , 7:04pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by leah_s

hahaha, no freezing makes the cakes moister. Geez where's you get the ideas that freezing makes cakes tough? What the heck is a tough cake anyway?




Have you not ever bit into a piece of cake that was dense, dry, etc?? To me, that's a tough cake.

I can see freezing one if you want to carve, freezing does make that easier. I know of several decorators that do not freeze at all... and are very proud of that fact.

The_Sugar_Fairy Posted 4 May 2010 , 7:47pm

I agree, freezing cakes actually makes them moister. And easier to handle. I do it all the time now.

artscallion Posted 4 May 2010 , 8:16pm

I freeze every cake I make, unless time just doesn't allow it. But I firmly believe that freezing improves cake.

costumeczar Posted 4 May 2010 , 8:32pm

Freezing doesn't always improve cake, have you ever had something from Walmart? icon_wink.gif

artscallion Posted 4 May 2010 , 10:47pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by costumeczar

Freezing doesn't always improve cake, have you ever had something from Walmart? icon_wink.gif




Haha! Thankfully, I've never even been IN a Walmart. icon_biggrin.gif

costumeczar Posted 4 May 2010 , 11:03pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by artscallion

Quote:
Originally Posted by costumeczar

Freezing doesn't always improve cake, have you ever had something from Walmart? icon_wink.gif



Haha! Thankfully, I've never even been IN a Walmart. icon_biggrin.gif




Then you need to go to peopleofwalmart.com to see what you're missing. I've never seen anything like what's on that site at the Walmart near me, though, I never see the good stuff!

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