Supporting Tiered Cake

Decorating By ecstaticjellybean Updated 22 Apr 2010 , 12:14am by sarah5008

ecstaticjellybean Posted 20 Apr 2010 , 11:27am
post #1 of 16

I was wondering if anybody could advise on how to make a makeshift support for a tiered cake. I wanted one layer to sit directly on top of another, but I'm worried it will sink.

I have to make it for this weekend, so i would have time to order proper dowels or anything like that

thanks for any advice!

15 replies
mamawrobin Posted 20 Apr 2010 , 11:35am
post #2 of 16

No need to order any "special dowels". I use drinking straws all the time on my smaller cakes. I used drinking straws in everyone of my cakes that I have in my gallery. DON'T EVER stack without supporting with supports (straws, dowels and cake boards or your cake will collapse on you.

I NEVER use dowels. I use straws only. They are always easy to get, they're easy to cut and since they fill up with cake they are actually a stronger support than doweling.

ecstaticjellybean Posted 20 Apr 2010 , 11:44am
post #3 of 16

Thats a brilliant idea, so easy!

was just checking out your gallery, you're a talented lady!

Thanks so much!

Amber0508 Posted 20 Apr 2010 , 12:08pm
post #4 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by mamawrobin

No need to order any "special dowels". I use drinking straws all the time on my smaller cakes. I used drinking straws in everyone of my cakes that I have in my gallery.

I NEVER use dowels. I use straws only. They are always easy to get, they're easy to cut and since they fill up with cake they are actually a stronger support than doweling.




I use the wooden dowels, and have heard a lot about the drinking straws, but am afraid to try them... I should just jump on in with it? Any special advice, just treat them the same way? I've been using wooden bamboo skewers that have the pointy tips that will stick into my foam-core bases, too, to avoid any shifting.

FlourPots Posted 20 Apr 2010 , 12:50pm
post #5 of 16

mamawrobin...do you mean bubble tea straws, or regular thin drinking straws?

I only use the bubble straws and love how they work.

imtad Posted 20 Apr 2010 , 3:32pm
post #6 of 16

What is a bubble straw???

cakeglitz Posted 20 Apr 2010 , 3:51pm
post #7 of 16

I hve made several tierd cakes and while I was making one this weekend I thought about using straws but I wasn't sure if they would work. I despise cutting the dowel rods...they are such a pain!! Are you talking about regular drinking straws and how many would you use if you are doing like an 8, 6 tied cake? I love the idea!! Thanks!! icon_biggrin.gif

FlourPots Posted 20 Apr 2010 , 4:08pm
post #8 of 16

Bubble tea straws are straws that are longer, stronger, and have a wider opening than a regular drinking one, but are just as easy to cut...scissors work fine.

You can see Sharon using them here:




They're very inexpensive...I've read you can find them in Asian markets for about a dollar for 50 straws.
I bought my last set on ebay...I got 172 for about $10.00 w/ shipping. That seller (tenttown1 from Calif.) doesn't have any listed right now, but there are others.

cakeglitz...for that size, I would use 4 or 5 straws...4 to form a sort of square, and one in the middle - if it was traveling.

online_annie Posted 20 Apr 2010 , 4:24pm
post #9 of 16

I too only use Bubble Tea Straws and have never had a problem. I purchase mine from a few sellers on ebay. I have used them ever since I found Sharon Zambito's Dvd's, can't believe I ever caked without them!

mamawrobin Posted 20 Apr 2010 , 4:34pm
post #10 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by FlourPots

mamawrobin...do you mean bubble tea straws, or regular thin drinking straws?

I only use the bubble straws and love how they work.




All of the cakes in my galleries are supported with drinking straws. I can't find bubble tea straws in my area but I did find some drinking straws that are about the same size as McDonald's straws. I've never had a problem with them. I also use them where I work and I do alot of two-tiered cakes. None of them have ever sunk, shifted or had any issues with my support system icon_smile.gif

The yellow and red three tiered cake in my gallery is still sitting in my breakfast nook and it was made a couple of weeks ago (obviously no one will be eating it icon_lol.gif ) but it hasn't budged!

liztanner30 Posted 20 Apr 2010 , 4:44pm
post #11 of 16

Not JUST "drinking straws"-all straws are not created equal! You must use something stronger, like bubble tea straws.

I personally have had 2 disasters with wooden dowels, so I would use them.

Can you get to a hardware store and pick up some very small PVC pipes to cut?

jdelaney81 Posted 20 Apr 2010 , 4:55pm
post #12 of 16

I too use the straws. I have never had any problems with them. I also use a bamboo skewer down the middle. It already is sharpened at one end...Works great!

Amber0508 Posted 20 Apr 2010 , 5:42pm
post #13 of 16

Such great and helpful info! I'm going to try and find some in Cary, NC this week, and hopefully use in a cake this weekend!

tastyart Posted 20 Apr 2010 , 8:05pm
post #14 of 16

I use dowels or skewers. I can certainly see how the straws would work. I usually have to transport my cakes. I don't think it matters if you use the dowels or straws as long as you have the dowel or skewer down through the middle. It prevents shifting which is the biggest problem for me in transport. They don't usually sink because of the transport just tip over or slide. I use 5 to support a 6" tier, all evenly spaced about an inch in from the edge of the cake. HTH

mamawrobin Posted 20 Apr 2010 , 8:13pm
post #15 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by liztanner30

Not JUST "drinking straws"-all straws are not created equal! You must use something stronger, like bubble tea straws.

I personally have had 2 disasters with wooden dowels, so I would use them.

Can you get to a hardware store and pick up some very small PVC pipes to cut?




Yes drinking straws definitely do work. I've proved it over and over. I don't use the skinny ones though mine look just like the ones you get at McDonalds. I've transported cakes many many times using straws and cake boards as my support system and I've never had a cake to sag, collapse or disappoint me in any way icon_smile.gif

You certainly don't need to use pvc pipe for support unless you have a very large cake.

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