Calling All Petit Fours Makers!

Decorating By mrswendel Updated 19 Apr 2010 , 7:18pm by DoubleA

mrswendel Posted 19 Apr 2010 , 2:56pm
post #1 of 5

Hi everyone,

I have been asked to make some petit fours for a senior ladies luncheon. I have been looking at a ton of instructions and have been finding alot of different processes. Just wondering for those of you who make these regularly, would you care to share your process?

I am finding the following info:
Bake a sheet cake, freeze, cut into squares OR bake sheet cake, torte and fill, freeze and cut into squares.
Cover with fruit glaze OR buttercream
Then cover top with marzipan OR poured icing.
Coat entire petit four with poured icing OR poured fondant OR rolled fondant.

Just wondering what you have found works best for you and any tips that you have that makes these a little easier.

Thanks.

4 replies
KHalstead Posted 19 Apr 2010 , 3:07pm
post #2 of 5

how big are you making them??

Some people consider a 2" x2" x2" slice of cake a petit four.

My idea of a petit four is literally a bite of cake.....no more than 1"x1"x1" in size.

If you're doing that, your best bet I think is to make cake in jelly roll pans so you get thin sheets of cake..........unless you have an agbay leveler in which case you can cut all those layers out of a regular sheet cake.

mrswendel Posted 19 Apr 2010 , 4:04pm
post #3 of 5

Size is the other thing....seems to be some discrepancy on that too. Most of the info that I have found are referring to cakes that are approx 1 inch high, cut into squares 1 to 1.5 inches or 2 inches if doing rounds. I like the look of the rounds, but am thinking that a square is much less time consuming with less waste (no need to use cutters).

mrswendel Posted 19 Apr 2010 , 7:08pm
post #4 of 5

anyone else?

DoubleA Posted 19 Apr 2010 , 7:18pm
post #5 of 5

I use the 1 inch size squares, and find it easiest to bake the sheet cake, frost light w/ BC, freeze hard, trim up square after frozen, cut all squares of cake using a ruler, then pour fondant over squares using two (2) pourings, pour once, let firm, pour again, let firm. Decorate!

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