...make A Gp Gymnast In A Very Odd Position???

Decorating By Chef_Stef Updated 28 Apr 2010 , 8:34pm by Peridot

Chef_Stef Posted 17 Apr 2010 , 9:34pm
post #1 of 16

So I've never really done GP people, and of course my first one is a gymnast/body builder in a position that made me say "Are you SERIOUS?" And of course, they are.

I can't even describe it, but basically it's like a strange version of a 'leapfrog' position, but just the hands are touching the floor (cake).

How would you do this? Make the whole thing in one piece? Make the torso, arms, legs separately and try to make them stick together (AND balance on the hands??). I made a torso and short sleeves so far, but I'm not at the shop til Monday to finish working on it, and I'm curious the best way to proceed.

I'm pretty sure I'll wish I hadn't signed up for this.

ANYONE who's done gp people, I need you...bad

15 replies
Kitagrl Posted 17 Apr 2010 , 9:50pm
post #2 of 16

Any way to post a pic so we can see exactly what you mean?

Bunsen Posted 17 Apr 2010 , 10:02pm
post #3 of 16

I'm no expert but for the few I've done I use styro and floral wire to add structure and lessen the weight - make a frame then cover with gumpaste. You need to work out where the balancing point is so the figure doesn't topple over - but if the human body can hold in this position, gumpaste can do it too!

Doug Posted 17 Apr 2010 , 10:03pm
post #4 of 16

this position?

use a wire armature covered in fondant / gumpaste / modeling chocolate

example of a dog (tho it looks more like a horse to me!)

you'd do one that's only got two "feet" -- aka the arms.

diagram based on image above:

Price Posted 17 Apr 2010 , 10:04pm
post #5 of 16

I'm with Kitagrl, can you post a picture? I think I have a picture in my mind of what you are talking about, but not positive. I find it best to make my figures in pieces and I "glue" them together before they harden using edible glue. For the glue, I use tylose powder desolved in warm water. Some people prefer a little gumpaste dissolved in water. If it's how I have it pictured, the main issue will be to keep your figure balanced. Although I have never tried it, some people use modeling chocolate. That might be something to consider with this figure. You could make an armature and mold the choc. clay around it.

Chef_Stef Posted 17 Apr 2010 , 10:34pm
post #6 of 16

Thanks you guys! I forgot about the wire idea...hmm.

I wish it were that pic position...unfortunately, it's even stranger. I have a pic they sent me, but it's still in that email.

She's facing the camera, balanced on her hands, and her legs are facing forward in a super wide V. Her elbows and upper arms I think are holding her legs up, so her toes are pointing out and to the front. Her um...rear end is very sharply down towards the floor, but not touching the floor. I can't even imagine how she GOT in that position. It looks like something out of cirque du soleil.

If I get time I'll post the pic. I told them I may have to make some way to support the back end of the body other than just the arms, but if it had wire through the whole thing, that would work MUCH better.

Chef_Stef Posted 17 Apr 2010 , 10:44pm
post #7 of 16

ok here's the picture...

I seriously thought it was someone pulling my leg when I got the email, lol

casme Posted 18 Apr 2010 , 12:11am
post #8 of 16

I would do it in pieces also. First I would do the arms and hands, making sure they are totally dry before adding the other pieces. One tip , make sure you get the angle correct or it wont support the wieght of the body. I would also put long toothpicks or skewers coming out of the hands so it will stay upright when you put it on the cake/

Doug Posted 18 Apr 2010 , 12:25am
post #9 of 16

same concept, just bend the wires for the legs forward -- and a much flatter back.

Chef_Stef Posted 18 Apr 2010 , 12:37am
post #10 of 16


Ok, so if I do a wire figure first...(obviously new at this)...how do you cover it in GP? roll the stuff very flat and thin and wrap it, for the arms and legs, or thicker and stick the wire through it? Do the torso first, then add legs and arms? I'm blanking out, for some reason.

I should have just said 'no', lol!

Doug Posted 18 Apr 2010 , 12:45am
post #11 of 16

can moosh in cotton balls

or RKT

or cover with aluminum foil

or just moosh in selected modeling material

this site shows aluminum foil method:

method depends on size and thickness of area.

so in main body for weight saving -- foil

arms & legs -- just the modeling material

then continue to add modeling material of choice to smooth and detail it out.

Chef_Stef Posted 27 Apr 2010 , 5:01pm
post #12 of 16

Hi and thanks everyone for the tips. I had fits with the GP girl last week, so I thought I'd post how it turned out. I wasn't sure I liked her, or that she didn't look like a 5-year-old made her, but after I got her on the cake and delivered her to some very thrilled customers ( icon_biggrin.gif ), I decided she wasn't so bad. AND she stayed there balanced on her hands!! (wires went into straws in the cake... SO thrilled that it worked!

I wasn't thrilled that I got condensation droplets on my perfect black surface on the cake, however... argh It's always something.

Here's the final cake:

Price Posted 27 Apr 2010 , 7:15pm
post #13 of 16

Perfect! Looks like you had nothing to worry about. She turned out amazing! thumbs_up.gif

Doug Posted 27 Apr 2010 , 9:27pm
post #14 of 16

YDG! RG!!!

(aka: ya dun gud! real gud!!)


honeyscakes Posted 28 Apr 2010 , 6:31pm
post #15 of 16

Doug...YOU ARE AMAZING!!! I WANT TO THANK YOU FOR THE HELP ON THIS POST..because I learnt SO much from your diagrams and link icon_smile.gif YOU ROCK~!!! thumbs_up.gif
(my son is a gymnist too...I think he will love a cake like this icon_smile.gif

Peridot Posted 28 Apr 2010 , 8:34pm
post #16 of 16

What a great job!!! Fantastic!!

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