Wrapped With Chocolate Then Covered With Fondant? How?

Decorating By dcabrera Updated 15 Apr 2010 , 4:30am by dcabrera

dcabrera Posted 14 Apr 2010 , 7:19am
post #1 of 8

I recently had a piece of cake that was wrapped with chocolate then covered with fondant. I was impressed with how well it held up considering how mushy it was on the inside. You couldn't even slice the cake it was so gooey it was being served with a spoon.
I want to learn how to do this. Do I cover it with chocolate, SMBC and then fondant? Or do I go chocolate wrap then fondant? I recently saw a tutorial on how to wrap a cake with chocolate and made a complete mess.

7 replies
chocolatestone Posted 14 Apr 2010 , 8:25am
post #2 of 8

What do you mean when you say the cake was wrapped in chocolate. I know that lots of people like to use a stiff ganache under their fondant cakes instead of buttercream to achieve sharp edges.

princesscris Posted 14 Apr 2010 , 8:59am
post #3 of 8

I think it was probably ganache under the fondant.

Make a ganache from 2 parts chocolate to 1 part cream: heat the cream to just below a boil and then pour over chopped chocolate, allow cream to melt chocolate and then stir to combine - it will come together. If it separates, add a little cool cream and stir again, it will come back together. Then leave the ganache to setup at room temperature overnight - it will be the consistency of peanut butter.

Apply the ganache to the cake (like you would buttercream) and it leave to set for a few hours (or less in the fridge) - it will seem quite firm. A hot spatula will help you get a really smooth finish and sharp edges. The ganache forms a bit of a shell around the cake. I usually brush a very thin layer of sieved apricot jam over the ganache and then apply the fondant. When you cut the cake it does look like the cake has been covered in chocolate first.

Regards,
Cris.

newbaker55 Posted 14 Apr 2010 , 9:48am
post #4 of 8

Cris...THANK YOU for the ganache instructions icon_biggrin.gif
OP...I'm curious about the seriously mushy cake?? Was it done? icon_confused.gif

dcabrera Posted 14 Apr 2010 , 8:34pm
post #5 of 8

The cake was wrapped with chocolate. Like a chocolate transfer. When you bit it there was a crunch. The cake was done but the filling was heavy/runny so it ruined the cake. It wasn't ganache. I don't know if I'm making any sense.
Or maybe it was frosted with melted chocolate? I don't know but it's driving me crazy. I need to try that technique. Just don't know where or how to start.

dcabrera Posted 14 Apr 2010 , 8:42pm
post #6 of 8

Okay, so I called the bakery my friend had her cake made at. They said they cover the cake with BC, wrap with chocolate transfer, cover with BC, then wrap with fondant. I HAVE TO TRY THIS!! This cake was perfection. Aside from the inside being all mushy.

kathik Posted 14 Apr 2010 , 10:29pm
post #7 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by dcabrera

Okay, so I called the bakery my friend had her cake made at. They said they cover the cake with BC, wrap with chocolate transfer, cover with BC, then wrap with fondant. I HAVE TO TRY THIS!! This cake was perfection. Aside from the inside being all mushy.




I'm not sure I get it. Could you describe what it is about this style that you liked? It sounds like it would be very, very sweet. Was it? And, did you say the chocolate transfer was crunchy? It sounds like a lot of weight. Could the cake have been mushy from the weight and not from the filling? I'm intrigued, but having a hard time picturing this.

Thanks,
Kathi

dcabrera Posted 15 Apr 2010 , 4:30am
post #8 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by kathik

Quote:
Originally Posted by dcabrera

Okay, so I called the bakery my friend had her cake made at. They said they cover the cake with BC, wrap with chocolate transfer, cover with BC, then wrap with fondant. I HAVE TO TRY THIS!! This cake was perfection. Aside from the inside being all mushy.



I'm not sure I get it. Could you describe what it is about this style that you liked? It sounds like it would be very, very sweet. Was it? And, did you say the chocolate transfer was crunchy? It sounds like a lot of weight. Could the cake have been mushy from the weight and not from the filling? I'm intrigued, but having a hard time picturing this.

Thanks,
Kathi



What I liked about this is how smooth it looked. Super sharp edges and sides. It was not very sweet which is another thing I liked about it. It was mushy from the cake because the support was right on. It was supported by 5- 4"X1" wood wide wooden dowel. When she took the dowels out, the cake just sank. She was instructed to refrigerate it but didn't. Hope I am making sense.

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%