Leveling The Frosting...

Decorating By Rhonda19 Updated 14 Apr 2010 , 5:53pm by indydebi

Rhonda19 Posted 14 Apr 2010 , 3:38am
post #1 of 8

I have a couple of questions about frosting, that I wanted to ask some of you experts out there....

I have such a hard time putting enough frosting on. Then when I think I finally have enough on, and start to level it off, I end up scraping the excess and more besides.

I also have a hard time leveling off the frosting on the sides. I do fine
( Usually ) leveling my cakes off before frosting them. But after I put that frosting on I just have such a hard time scraping the excess off and getting enough on there!!! I have purchased a Buttercream DVD but it wasn't a really good one. I have also taken a beginners decorating class and a couple of workshops. So, I understand the technique, it just doesn't really work for me...

Any one care to share their techniques???

7 replies
kaseyrconnect Posted 14 Apr 2010 , 3:53am
post #2 of 8

Wish I could help you, but I, too, have the same problem. I would love to hear what others do to get their frosting on evenly.

littlesydney Posted 14 Apr 2010 , 4:16am
post #3 of 8

Edna dela Cruz posted a video on YouTube, which is superb. All of her videos are fantastic!

poohsmomma Posted 14 Apr 2010 , 12:07pm
post #4 of 8

Yes, Edna's video is great. Sharon Zambito also has great tips.

indydebi Posted 14 Apr 2010 , 5:21pm
post #5 of 8

Can you tell us a bit about how you are removing it. What tool are you using? Sounds like you're using too much pressure when removing the icing. I also find a bench scraper better than using a spatula.

A rubber bench scraper is good. Saw a demo where a woman used a credit card. The flexibility of the plastic really helped me learn the smoothing method, then I "graduated" to the metal scraper.

On smoothing the sides, I use the bench scraper and use the bottom cardboard as a guide (the cardboard sticks out about 1/16" or 1/8" inch from the cake). This helps prevent you from getting the bench scraper too close to the cake and removing too much icing.

VNatividad Posted 14 Apr 2010 , 5:37pm
post #6 of 8

Great tip, thanks indydebi. A light bulb just went off with your tip of using the bottom cardboard as a guide. I'm just a hobby baker so when I've frosted a cake for class I place it on a bigger board and it is difficult when taking off excess and make it level and even. I know it may seem really dumb but I'm so excited to frost when I get home!

VNatividad Posted 14 Apr 2010 , 5:38pm
post #7 of 8

Great tip, thanks indydebi. A light bulb just went off with your tip of using the bottom cardboard as a guide. I'm just a hobby baker so when I've frosted a cake for class I place it on a bigger board and it is difficult when taking off excess and make it level and even. I know it may seem really dumb but I'm so excited to frost when I get home!

indydebi Posted 14 Apr 2010 , 5:53pm
post #8 of 8

If you like putting your cakes on larger boards (and I do when it's a single tier cake, like for birthdays), then you can still use the cardboard guide just by putting the 10" cake on a 10" board (there's usually a bit of extended cardboard) and then putting that on a 12" board. It's a little extra support AND you still have the board as a guide. thumbs_up.gif

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