How Do You Ice And Smooth A Cake Tier Like This One???

Decorating By honeyscakes Updated 15 Apr 2010 , 3:31am by anxietyattack

honeyscakes Posted 13 Apr 2010 , 6:03pm
post #1 of 13

Hi all,
I am "thinking" about creating a cake like this for my niece in June 2010.
all they need is for it to feed the invited guests and match her wedding colors,rest is all up to me,gotta love sweet in laws heehee icon_lol.gif
Now I wanted to try making something "different" other than a basic 3 tier cake.
I can smooth my 5 1/4" high cakes (Sugarshack BC) with a bench scraper and it works perfectly OK! but what do I do with this tall tier in the middle?
How would you ice and smooth it?
Also, it will be a 4 round tiers cake,all stacked on top of each other.No decorations,just a silk ribbon,some dragees and a plaque on the 2nd tier.I will be travelling with it ..about 60 minutes.I want to "finish" the cake before I head out as I will be all dressed up and dont wan to work with frosting and stacking tiers etc at the venue. Do you have suggestions/advice/ideas/experiences to share? anything I should know?
oh I will construct the tall tier with 4 layers of cake(dense golden butter cake) and there will be a foam core board between layer 2 and 3.so basically it will be 2, 8" tiers stacked on top of each other with dowels and bubble tea straws.
Any help and advice will be appreciated.
Thanks
- h
LL

12 replies
catlharper Posted 13 Apr 2010 , 7:09pm
post #2 of 13

Ok, the first problem is that the cake you have pictured is a fondant covered cake, not buttercream. That will make it a different presentation than the photo. Have you tried the viva towel with the paint roller technique? This has worked on taller tiers for me. As for travelling with it completed...not something I would do. I am required to travel to the Bay Area all the time with stacked cakes and if they are more than two tiers I always assemble at the venue. I have been known to do two and two and just do the one stack but that is SO hard to get right. I have heard that if you do a center dowel it would work but it's not something I have personal experience with. If it were me doing this cake I'd do it in fondant and assemble each tier on site. I'd be terrified of travelling so far with it stacked, even with a center dowel. Gorgeous cake...hope to get to see your version of it!

tiggy2 Posted 13 Apr 2010 , 7:25pm
post #3 of 13

For transporting I would suggest the sps support system. There is a sticy at the top of the "How Do I" forum that explains it and you should be able to assemble before delivery. As for smoothing an 8" tier you could use a large drywall knife found at home improvement stores. They come in many sizes and as long as you sterilize it you should be fine. This cake appears to have an all over shine so I would also airbrush with pearl color.

leah_s Posted 13 Apr 2010 , 7:47pm
post #4 of 13

I'd just do that in fondant.

Oh and SPS of course.

DeeDelightful Posted 13 Apr 2010 , 7:52pm
post #5 of 13

Leave in plenty of time to assemble cake and get dressed up before the wedding. You will be upset if you carry that cake in and get icing on yourself and don't have a single tool to fix a smudge. Smooth with a VIVA towel.

PoodleDoodle Posted 13 Apr 2010 , 8:24pm
post #6 of 13

Not to horn in on your post but do you cut the tall tier any differently that the others?

honeyscakes Posted 14 Apr 2010 , 4:18pm
post #7 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by PoodleDoodle

Not to horn in on your post but do you cut the tall tier any differently that the others?



Nah...its cool icon_smile.gif I found that info in this post
http://cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-675450.html
and that's where I got this crazy idea of making this cake icon_biggrin.gif

honeyscakes Posted 14 Apr 2010 , 4:31pm
post #8 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by leah_s

I'd just do that in fondant.

Oh and SPS of course.



SIGH...icon_sad.gif
I wish I could...but no one in the family likes fondant (any kind) plus,I work part time...so I couldn't afford that much expense on the cake icon_sad.gif since it is a gift from me and hubby to his niece.
AND...I am also making 3 more cakes for 3 other people who are getting married in June and May! one is my best friend ( her cake will be the wedding present), my other niece(present) and a charity wedding cake!
I am loving all this work.Its a good deed and if I can help anyone with my skill I'd be blessed to do so...but I have to stay in my budget (sigh icon_sad.gif ]
Now that being said, I will look into the SPS system icon_biggrin.gif THANK YOU SOOOOOOOO MUCH FOR THAT SUGGESTION!
Yes, I will make sure I keep plenty of time on hand icon_smile.gif since I am the "designated cake maker" at all these events,I didn't get to be incharge of any other craziness icon_lol.gif so all I have to do...is to kill myself working on the cakes...get them to the venues and then sit and relax like a guest and have fun (unlike the rest of the family running around cRaZy fixing last minute things)
tiggy2, THANK YOU!!! I will swing by Home depot this evening when I go running...it is a few miles from where I live and I will go check it out.BIG HELP!!!
To all those who suggested Viva.Yes I do use Viva, I use Sharon's buttercream so it is pretty smooth itself, but then again...i was wondering about all those, "what if...."
Thank you SO much for replying.
I think I will stack the whole cake but the top 2 tiers and assemble it at the venue.I have traveled with a 4 tier cake all stacked and decorated ... it was just fine after a 60 minutes ride...however all the tiers were the same height!
oh well...I will keep you guys posted...
Anyone else,who has made any cakes like this one??? any experiences?
perhaps I cake try stacking two dummies on top of each other and try my hand at icing them for a trial icon_rolleyes.gif
-h

SugaredUp Posted 14 Apr 2010 , 4:36pm
post #9 of 13

I have made tall tiers, but I have used fondant. However, you can do this!

For the tall tier, I think you should be able to ice each cake on its own board, smooth out the cakes, then stack them as you normally would, only they are stacked same size on top of same size, then fill in the crack with a small round tip. Use a pallette knife to smooth out the buttercream over the crack. A pallette knife will give you more control and you'll be able to squeeze in there and get it perfect - just don't accidentally stick your hand into the buttercream as you're using it! LOL

Good luck!

SugaredUp Posted 14 Apr 2010 , 4:39pm
post #10 of 13

Oh - one more thing. In Sugarshack's stacking video, I picked up this tip, which you will probably need to utilize for this tall tier...

Create a small amount of stiffened buttercream by adding a lot of powdered sugar to your buttercream until it's pretty stiff. Then apply that to the crack evenly around where the tiers join. Do this first. Then go back over and use the small round tip with the regular buttercream, smoothing with a pallette knife.

I think you should use the stiffened buttercream in order to avoid being able to see the cardboard through the buttercream and in order to avoid any cracks from forming around that tier.

Hopefully this makes sense.

honeyscakes Posted 14 Apr 2010 , 4:44pm
post #11 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by SugaredUp

Oh - one more thing. In Sugarshack's stacking video, I picked up this tip, which you will probably need to utilize for this tall tier...

Create a small amount of stiffened buttercream by adding a lot of powdered sugar to your buttercream until it's pretty stiff. Then apply that to the crack evenly around where the tiers join. Do this first. Then go back over and use the small round tip with the regular buttercream, smoothing with a pallette knife.

I think you should use the stiffened buttercream in order to avoid being able to see the cardboard through the buttercream and in order to avoid any cracks from forming around that tier.

Hopefully this makes sense.



OMG! YES I love EVERYTHING I learnt from all her DVDs...
I never thought of stacking to iced cakes together icon_biggrin.gif I was thinking more like...putting both 10" cakes,on their own foamcore board,just as I'd normally do for any cake I make, and then frosting them all in one go!
I will try it the way you explained..it made perfect sense...THANK YOU SOOOOOOOOOO MUCH!!!
- H

SugaredUp Posted 14 Apr 2010 , 7:28pm
post #12 of 13

Glad I could help!

anxietyattack Posted 15 Apr 2010 , 3:31am
post #13 of 13

Honeyscake, I just did a wedding cake for a good friend of mine and I brought my dress with me and changed after I setup the cake. I just didn't want to risk anything. Good luck. The picture of the "goal" is beautiful.

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