Soo Many Fondant Questions

Decorating By SugarSugarDesserts Updated 12 Apr 2010 , 7:27pm by ibmoser

SugarSugarDesserts Posted 12 Apr 2010 , 5:03pm
post #1 of 7

Can anyone point me to a step by step guide to covering a cake in fondant. Most of the guides I have found do not answer all my questions. For example:

How thick do you put on the buttercream crumb coat?

Do you let it crust or put it in the refrigerator? Why do some people (like the decorators on challenge) put it in the refrigerator prior to covering with fondant? If you put it in the refrigerator do you have to let it sit out before covering it in fondant?

Once it has crusted how do you get the fondant to stick to it?

How thick is the fondant suppose to be?

Please Help icon_smile.gif

6 replies
nowotny Posted 12 Apr 2010 , 6:14pm
post #2 of 7

I second these questions.

JawdroppingCakes Posted 12 Apr 2010 , 6:32pm
post #3 of 7

Check out this link, it has so many tutorials and there are some for the questions you are asking.

Elaine2581 Posted 12 Apr 2010 , 6:32pm
post #4 of 7

I'm no expert, by any means but when I took the Wilton Fondant course, they told us to apply a thin layer of buttercream then a little piping get at the bottom of the cake (about one inch). Roll the fondant as thin as you think you can handle it; usually 1/4 to 3/8-inch. Work quickly and smooth it from top to bottom, pulling it out away from the sides to work out the wrinkles. Hope that helps. Perhaps those with more experience can explain it better. If you do allow the buttercream to crust, some people mist it with water before applying the fondant. Refrigerating can cause condensation and air bubbles in my opinion.

paulstonia Posted 12 Apr 2010 , 6:33pm
post #5 of 7

Well first off I don't think there is one answer for most of your questions. A lot of it is just personal preference. I find if I put too thick a coat of buttercream it is too pliable under my fondant. This may be because I use real butter in my buttercream and it softens up. But some people like a good thick coat of buttercream under there so the people who don't like fondant still have a buttercream frosting on there cake when they don't eat the fondant. Some people only crumb coat, I crumb coat and then I do put another coat of buttercream on the cake, just not as much as I would for a buttercream only cake. I do put it in the fridge, because I like my frosting to firm up since I tend to see it softening up while I'm smoothing my fondant. I also like that the cake firms up a little. I will brush a little water on to get the fondant to stick, some people will use a simple syrup. Some people leave it out to come to room temp. before covering in fondant because they get air bubble between the cake and fondant. This can happen as the cake comes to room temp. I've only had this happen once so for now I usually cover my cake while it is cold. Thickness of the fondant is subjective too. Some people find if it is too thick it tears because of weight, too thin and you can have problem too. I have read 1/4 is good. But it really depends on the cake I'm doing. On a tiered cake I like it as thin as I can get without it tearing. On a carve cake, like a purse or a diaper bag, I like it a little thicker, more realistic looking. Hope this hasn't confused you, and I'm sure much more expierenced decorators will be able to offer more info.

LuvLyrics Posted 12 Apr 2010 , 6:38pm
post #6 of 7

I know you need quick instructions, but I highly recommend Sugarshack's DVD.. she answer all those questions and gives you a bunch of tips.

About your buttercream, don't add a thick layer b/c your fondant will be dancing all over the place and it wont look smooth, I like using shortening to roll it, to keep it from drying and cracking, not too much thought.. Good luck !!!! post pics

ibmoser Posted 12 Apr 2010 , 7:27pm
post #7 of 7

Check out the free video tutorials at

There are a number of different techniques featured. Also check YouTube videos on applying fondant - there are some from "big-name" decorators. Fast and free thumbs_up.gif There is a particularly good video tut from Julie Bashore using Satin Ice, but I can't find it right now. Maybe you can Google.... And, Sugarshack's DVDs are well worth the investment - shipping usually takes less than a week.

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