Gelatin In Cakes (Plain Jello)

Baking By Roxybc Updated 13 Apr 2010 , 11:45am by kizrash

Roxybc Posted 9 Apr 2010 , 3:13pm
post #1 of 14

So I've been thinking - a lot of people lately have been recommending to add flavoured Jello (not the pudding) into your cakes to make it sturdier. What are your thoughts about adding plain unflavoured gelatin powder to your cake mix (either from scratch or boxed). I was wondering if this would help the cakes stay moister and add a bit of density for carving, or to hold their shape if needed while not effecting the flavour of a cake. What are your thoughts? Has anyone tried this before?

13 replies
KHalstead Posted 9 Apr 2010 , 3:23pm
post #2 of 14

just add a pudding mix, it accomplishes the same thing (because it has gelatin in it) you can use a flavor that's the same as the cake you're making


white cake = white choc. pudding/cheesecake pudding
yellow cake = vanilla pudding
chocolate cake = chocolate pudding
lemon cake = lemon pudding
banana cake = banana pudding
carrot cake = vanilla /butterscotch (so good) pudding

you can find an exact flavor or a complimentary flavor match for EVERY cake flavor out there!

Tracy7953 Posted 9 Apr 2010 , 3:32pm
post #3 of 14

I have used lemon, strawberry and orange jello in white cake mix...YUM! It is also good in buttercream or Pastry Pride for fillings.

tiggerjo Posted 9 Apr 2010 , 3:41pm
post #4 of 14

jello, do you use the whole package???

kizrash Posted 9 Apr 2010 , 3:48pm
post #5 of 14

O.k sorry about the ignorance of this, I'm from U.K. What exactly is Jello? icon_redface.gif

Tracy7953 Posted 9 Apr 2010 , 3:48pm
post #6 of 14

I buy by the large bags so I don't know how much is in a package. Usually I start with about a half cup of pudding or jello and slowly add it to my recipe. Mix it in, let it sit for a few minutes, mix again and see if you like the flavor and consistency. You can always add more. I had to play with it before I found the right measurement for whatever recipe I am using at the time. Just remember that the gelatin in the jello thickens whatever you are adding it to.

leily Posted 9 Apr 2010 , 3:54pm
post #7 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by kizrash

O.k sorry about the ignorance of this, I'm from U.K. What exactly is Jello? icon_redface.gif




Jello is a brand name for gelatin. It is the largest Brand in the US.

Here is a little history on it and more explination.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jell-O

Roxybc Posted 9 Apr 2010 , 3:55pm
post #8 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by KHalstead

just add a pudding mix, it accomplishes the same thing (because it has gelatin in it) you can use a flavor that's the same as the cake you're making


white cake = white choc. pudding/cheesecake pudding
yellow cake = vanilla pudding
chocolate cake = chocolate pudding
lemon cake = lemon pudding
banana cake = banana pudding
carrot cake = vanilla /butterscotch (so good) pudding

you can find an exact flavor or a complimentary flavor match for EVERY cake flavor out there!




Well the thing is that here in the UK we don't have the Jello brand and pudding doesn't exist!!! It's the strangest thing! When I moved here from Canada people were always referring to pudding, but pudding as we know it in North America doesn't exist here. In the UK what they call pudding is stuff like bread pudding, or Christmas puddings, and they also refer to dessert in general as pudding, although it has nothing to do with actual pudding. For eg: if you go to a restaruant and they ask if you'd like any pudding and you say yes, it might actually be cheesecake. It's so weird! They have 3 or 4 different flavours of "Jelly" (Jello) here that come in crystal form like Jello does back home but they're pretty basic flavors like strawberry, orange, reasberry and maybe lemon. The other stuff they have is like a super concentrated jello brick that you disolve in boiling water, and then pour into cups as you wold regular Jello. As for Jello pudding, the closet thing I can think of that would be remotely similar here is either something called Angel Delight or Blamange - see below: Does anyone know if these would work as Jello pudding? I was thinking if the plain geletain would work, I could add in some of the Loranne oils or regular extracts for flavor.

Image

[unl]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Angel_Delight[/url]

Image

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blancmange

Roxybc Posted 9 Apr 2010 , 4:00pm
post #9 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by kizrash

O.k sorry about the ignorance of this, I'm from U.K. What exactly is Jello? icon_redface.gif




Jello is fabulous!!!! I love it, and I don't understand why they haven't brought it to the UK, the same with Jello pudding. It comes in every flavor under the sun, and whenever I go back to North America, I make sure to bring home a ton of it. Last time I went to texas I picked up some of the new limited edition flavors such as pina colada and strawberry daqueri jello, and I got the coconut cream, orea cookies and cream, cheesecake, butterscotch, and a few other flavors of the puddings. I sure wish Jello would expand into the UK. Actually I wish a lot of American things were available in the UK, but they'd probably be banned because of the high fructose corn syrup, colorings, and artificial flavors that are in so much American food - which I don't like btw, but some of the stuff is just so amazing!!! People in the UK don't know what they're missing!!

jhay Posted 9 Apr 2010 , 4:14pm
post #10 of 14

I use 1 small package of instant pudding for every 2 cake mixes. Works very well.

Tracy7953 Posted 9 Apr 2010 , 7:06pm
post #11 of 14

Jhay that's awesome...I knew someone would have an exact measurement!

kizrash Posted 9 Apr 2010 , 9:54pm
post #12 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by leily

Quote:
Originally Posted by kizrash

O.k sorry about the ignorance of this, I'm from U.K. What exactly is Jello? icon_redface.gif



Jello is a brand name for gelatin. It is the largest Brand in the US.

Here is a little history on it and more explination.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jell-O




Many thanks to 'Leily' for this information.
So from my understanding regular jello is quick jel to us, Or as RoxyBC put it (The other stuff they have is like a super concentrated jello brick that you disolve in boiling water, and then pour into cups as you wold regular Jello.) icon_lol.gificon_lol.gif or Jelly. Sorry it was the jello brick that made me laugh, and yes I wondered if our Angel Delight would be similar to your Jello pudding. thumbs_up.gif

Roxybc Posted 9 Apr 2010 , 10:57pm
post #13 of 14

So I've just been to the grocery store and got some of the UK jelly crystals - I thought that the ones in the box were crystals as well, but it's the same jelly brick, but just in a box by the Hartley's brand. The only jelly crystals I could find were sugar free - I guess they don't do regular jelly crystals here - guess I will have to go on another US trip!!! I got the sugar free stuff, but I'm not sure if it will work or not. I want to make a strawberry cake from scratch (which I posted in another thread in this forum) but I don't know if the UK sugar free jelly powder will work. Can someone advise me on this??

The directions say to sprinkle the powder into 285ml (10oz) of boiling water, stir until dissolved and then (I'm a bit confused about the wording of this) make up to 570ml (20oz) with cold water.

Leily: Do they mean add up to 20oz (like add whatever you feel like to a max of 20oz) or do they mean add another 10oz of cold water, so the total is 20oz.

Does anyone know if the US sugar free Jello works, or is it only the regular sugary kind? If the sugar free stuff works, are the measurements of water about the same as the instructions for the UK version above?

The ingredients are: Gelatine, natural colors, adipic acid, acidity regulator (trisodium citrate), flavourings, sweeteners (aspartame, acesulfame K), & fumaric acid.

Also, back to my original question - would plain gelatin work in a cake?

kizrash Posted 13 Apr 2010 , 11:45am
post #14 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roxybc



The directions say to sprinkle the powder into 285ml (10oz) of boiling water, stir until dissolved and then (I'm a bit confused about the wording of this) make up to 570ml (20oz) with cold water.

Leily: Do they mean add up to 20oz (like add whatever you feel like to a max of 20oz) or do they mean add another 10oz of cold water, so the total is 20oz




These instructions mean to add another 10oz so the total is 20oz. HTH

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