How Do I Get These Effects On My Cookies Using Royal Icing?

Baking By mom2spunkynbug Updated 9 Apr 2010 , 6:41pm by cricket0616

mom2spunkynbug Posted 9 Apr 2010 , 2:19pm
post #1 of 8

The first technique is where there are polka dots on the cookie/design...but they are not "on top" of the base color of icing...it's like they are flat & "in" the base coat of icing. How do you do that?

The other technique I've seen...it looks like there are lines, but there aren't. Maybe not lines, so much as indentations like lines - anyone know what I'm talking about? icon_redface.gif I would think that it would be easy to do if there are different colors, but I don't understand when it's the same color!? It almost seems as though one part is made, then left to dry, then the other part is made...

Know what I mean?

7 replies
iheartcupkakes Posted 9 Apr 2010 , 2:38pm
post #2 of 8

for the dots just add them when the first color is still wet..
but im no expert on this..
good luck

KHalstead Posted 9 Apr 2010 , 2:53pm
post #3 of 8

it would be REALLY helpful if you could locate some photos of the techniques you're curious about......then everyone that is familar with it could help you out!

ayerim979 Posted 9 Apr 2010 , 3:11pm
post #4 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by KHalstead

it would be REALLY helpful if you could locate some photos of the techniques you're curious about......then everyone that is familar with it could help you out!




I was just gonna suggest the same thing, to add a visual

Joyfull4444 Posted 9 Apr 2010 , 3:29pm
post #5 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by mom2spunkynbug

The first technique is where there are polka dots on the cookie/design...but they are not "on top" of the base color of icing...it's like they are flat & "in" the base coat of icing. How do you do that?

The other technique I've seen...it looks like there are lines, but there aren't. Maybe not lines, so much as indentations like lines - anyone know what I'm talking about? icon_redface.gif I would think that it would be easy to do if there are different colors, but I don't understand when it's the same color!? It almost seems as though one part is made, then left to dry, then the other part is made...

Know what I mean?




Click on the link, scroll down to the butterfly cookies and, you'll see info on adding dots. If you look closly at the last butterfly, most of the dots have blended in as you have described, but 3 on the right bottom wing did not. I suspect thats because the icing had firmed up in that area.

http://www.sweetopia.net/2009/06/cookie-decorating-tutorial-general-tips-butterfly-cookies/

TexasSugar Posted 9 Apr 2010 , 4:34pm
post #6 of 8

For the dots you just flood the cookie then right away drop some more thinned down icing in another color into the flooded area. It will sink. If you wait even a minute or two the icing will start to crust and the second color won't sink and blend in.

You can also take a toothpick and run it through the dot making swirls.

I'm not sure what you mean about the lines though. Picture?

bonniebakes Posted 9 Apr 2010 , 6:23pm
post #7 of 8

I think I know what you are talking about with the "indentation" line that you can see when using only one color... if I do understand what you are talking about, then yes, you are right - one section is done first and left to dry some, then the section next to it is dine and the two sections don't run together.

If you go to the picture of the shoes in my photos, you can see examples of both of the things you asked about... the dots (or other additions) that are the same level (called the "wet on wet technique") can be seen on the turquoise shoes or the cheetah shoes and the picture that shows the "indentation" line the best is the inside of the zebra print shoe (where the side meets the sole).

http://cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=gallery&file=displayimage&pid=1619850

hope that helps!

Bonnie

cricket0616 Posted 9 Apr 2010 , 6:41pm
post #8 of 8

One word of caution when doing this is watch your colors. If you make your dots out of a dark color they can bleed into a lighter color. For example: if you flood the cookie with a light pink and then make your dots out of a dark purple, you may find that the purple will bleed into your pink as it dries.

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