Amount Of Ganache?

Decorating By lecrn Updated 14 Apr 2010 , 8:38pm by sillywabbitz

lecrn Posted 8 Apr 2010 , 8:55pm
post #1 of 11

Sorry if this has been asked before, but I can't find any info on the subject. For those of you that use ganache under fondant, how do you know how much to make? Do you go by the amount of buttercream that it would take to crumb coat (like in cups)? How many cups of ganache will 2pounds choc: 1 pound cream make?
I was planning on practicing on a one tier cake to see how easy it is to apply and smooth ganache before I try a tiered cake.

10 replies
Roxybc Posted 9 Apr 2010 , 12:06am
post #2 of 11

I'd also like to know this, as I think ganache might be easier to use on the base of the giant cupcake than buttercream will given all the "edges" of the base.

Rylan Posted 9 Apr 2010 , 9:36pm
post #3 of 11

It depends on how thick or thin you want to apply it. With my experience, 5 pounds of chocolate and 1 pound of cream can cover a 10", 8", and two 6" rounds plus a few left. Sometimes, it can go even more.

lecrn Posted 10 Apr 2010 , 1:04pm
post #4 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rylan

It depends on how thick or thin you want to apply it. With my experience, 5 pounds of chocolate and 1 pound of cream can cover a 10", 8", and two 6" rounds plus a few left. Sometimes, it can go even more.




Thanks Rylan! I just reread your blog on ganache.
I have a few more questions if you don't mind. icon_lol.gif

I know that the ratio is 2 parts choc to 1 part cream. Do you weigh the cream on a scale instead of by volume in a measuring cup?
So, 16oz of choc. : 8oz of weighed cream?

In you blog, you state that you refrigerate the ganache after it's made. About how long does it take to come to the right consistency?

You also put the cake in the fridge after the ganache is applied (before the fondant)? About how long does it take in the fridge before the fondant goes on? Have you ever had any problem with condensation when you apply the fondant to a cold cake?

Sorry for all the idiot questions, but I just re-watched a sugarshack dvd where she is putting ganache on a cake, and there is a lot of letting the ganache sit on the counter. The ganache is made, bowl sits on the counter for 12hrs until correct consistency. The cake is ganached, sits on the counter for 12hrs until hardened. It seems like it would be more time effective if the fridge could speed things along if that wouldn't mess up the ganache or cause condensation to the finished fondant cake.

Thanks for you time!

sillywabbitz Posted 10 Apr 2010 , 1:38pm
post #5 of 11

I've used setting ganache under Fondant which is the 2 to 1 choc to cream ratio. You weigh the choc and use fluid ounces for the liquid. So 16 oz of choc to 8 oz or 1 cup of cream. That recipe made approximately 3 cups of ganache for me. I used it for filling and coating and it seemed to follow the number of cups of buttercream required to ice a cake recommened on the Wilton website. I would make a litlle more ganache than you think you need just to give you some breathing room. I loved working with ganache under fondant.
I did sugar shacks approach of letting sit out. I see no problem with chilling the warm ganache. I don't know about putting the covered cake in the fridge just because I didn't do it.
Oh but here is an important trick, do not store all your ganache in one big bowl. Put it into smaller containers. This makes it easier to reheat and if one batch is too warm you can add a small amount of the hardened ganache to bring it to the right temp. I hope this all makes senseicon_smile.gif good luck.

lecrn Posted 10 Apr 2010 , 4:25pm
post #6 of 11

Thanks so much. That's so helpful! I just want to be careful since it will be my first time, & I don't want to waste a bunch of choc. & cream b/c it's so expensive.

ceshell Posted 11 Apr 2010 , 1:02am
post #7 of 11

I have had similar experience to what's been posted above, although I must say that I find that my volume of final product is about 75% less than the weight. Meaning, if I use 8oz chocolate and 8oz cream, the resultant 16oz of ganache does NOT yield me 2 cups. The weight and volume are different; I get more like 1.5c ganache.

Of course you can fatten this amount right back up by whipping some air into it before applying to the cake.

I see you all mention the 2:1 ratio - that is for a firmer ganache. Keep in mind you can do it at 1:1 and still yield a very firm ganache, at least if you use 70% chocolate.

Rylan Posted 12 Apr 2010 , 10:10am
post #8 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by lecrn


I know that the ratio is 2 parts choc to 1 part cream. Do you weigh the cream on a scale instead of by volume in a measuring cup?
So, 16oz of choc. : 8oz of weighed cream?




Yes, I always measure by weight on a scale. So, 2 pounds of chocolate : 1 pound cream.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lecrn


In you blog, you state that you refrigerate the ganache after it's made. About how long does it take to come to the right consistency?




I refrigerate it after it has cooled a bit. I let it stay in the fridge usually about 2 hours or so (don't cover it). If it does get too hard, I just microwave it in 10 second intervals, mixing it everytime it comes out.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lecrn

You also put the cake in the fridge after the ganache is applied (before the fondant)? About how long does it take in the fridge before the fondant goes on? Have you ever had any problem with condensation when you apply the fondant to a cold cake?




Yes I do. I just refrigerate the ganache covered cake until it becomes solid like a chocolate bar. That way, it is easier for me to achieve sharp edges (just like covering a dummy). It would usually set up hard in 10 minutes or so. Once the cake has come to room temperature, it will get softer. I've never had problems with condensation--maybe because I live in a desert.

I hope that clears everything.

Bel_Anne Posted 12 Apr 2010 , 11:03am
post #9 of 11

I've learnt soo much about ganache this year. And it caused me so much stress learning it! Haha. While you can absolutely pop your ganache in the fridge... for taste/texture purposes it really is best to leave it to set overnight at room temp. For some chemistry reason (haha), it makes the ganache melt in your mouth like a truffle when eaten, yet still set firm on a cake. I was told putting it in the fridge can seperate fat particles and ruin the texture of the chocolate.... or something (that sounds scientific, eh!)

Also.. in many, many books it says to 'scald' the cream and pour over chocolate then stir to desired consistency. I have had MANY failed attempts at this, where it gets an oily residue on the top and becomes grainy to the point it's virtually unusable (expensive experiences). Until I read this article... http://acselementsofchocolate.typepad.com/elements_of_chocolate/Chocolate.html about half way down the page titled "ganache". Heat the cream then add SHAVED chocolate to the pan the cream is in - never had a problem since. Chocolate is supposedly one of the hardest ingredients to use in the kitchen and it's better to understand it on a chemical level (not that I completely do yet, haha).

Another tip - if you're using cheaper chocolate that has a lower cocoa mass percentage (so not couverture) then increase the ratio of chocolate to cream. It just will not set hard at a 2:1 ratio with compound chocolate... If you're just experimenting with cheap stuff, I'd go 3:1

And don't rush the 'setting' process by popping it in the fridge... It WILL set on the bench, and that's the best way to do it.

Bunsen Posted 12 Apr 2010 , 11:04am
post #10 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rylan

I've never had problems with condensation--maybe because I live in a desert.




The desert would definitely help! I tried this on a humid day and had so much trouble with condensation - made it impossible to get the fondant on neatly and then lots of huge air bubbles formed, never again!!

sillywabbitz Posted 14 Apr 2010 , 8:38pm
post #11 of 11

Oh and I used bakers chocolate for one batch and choc chips for another. The chips make a very weak chocolate...so I would use baker's chocolate if you can. If not you will need a lot more chips than the normal amount.

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